Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2011 09:44:56 -

Author: Paul Nord

Subject: Re: Switch

Post:


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I've long wanted to make (or find) a simple device which used a switch =
to control a much larger relay. The initial motivation for this was the =
Clapper which melted some internal contacts when I connected it to about =
8 strands of Christmas lights. It would have an outlet and two plugs. =
One would be the power to the outlet (connected through the relay) and =
the other would power the relay and be connected to an external switch.

Paul


On Dec 7, 2011, at 9:12 AM, Bill Alexander wrote:

> Hi Jerry,
>=20
> No, most foot switches aren't rated that high, usually using a =
microswitch. But it isn't that hard to include a relay of whatever size =
needed to handle the power. I made such a device just to plug in items I =
was working on so I could switch them on and off without moving my hands =
(perhaps holding probes on just the right positions).
>=20
> Bill A.
>=20
> On Wed, Dec 7, 2011 at 7:02 AM, Jerry Hester =
wrote:
> I am a big fan of foot switches. This makes it impossible for =
Lecturers to leave things on for long periods as if the foot is not on =
the switch the power is off. For most things, I put the switch out of =
reach of the demos so that Lecturers can=92t operate the switch and =
touch the demo. I like this especially for the glowing pickle and =
conduction in glass demos. Unfortunately, for JZ, these are not =
typically rated for 750 W.
>=20
> =20
>=20
> Jerry H.
>=20
> =20
>=20
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] =
On Behalf Of Dan Beeker
> Sent: Wednesday, December 07, 2011 9:36 AM
> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> Subject: Re: [tap-l] Switch
>=20
> =20
>=20
> We have foot switches on our units. A little safer than a hand held =
switch as the possibility of electrocution is much reduced if the switch =
self destructs. And it leaves both hands free for more and better demos.
>=20
> Dan Beeker=20
>=20
> On 12/7/11 8:29 AM, chuck britton wrote:
>=20
> I imagine that you're getting a good bit of 'inductive kickback' from =
the coil driver circuit.
>=20
> You might consider a small project box in-line that has a robust =
switch as well as a 'line conditioner' module. A module such as is found =
near the switch of most hefty electronic devices.
>=20
> .
>=20
> At 4:47 AM -0500 12/7/11, Zani, Gerald wrote:
>=20
> Brian,
>=20
> I know that 100A @ 110VAC is not 750W. But what I mean to somehow =
describe to folks, however crudely is that I am switching on and off a =
Tesla coil that draws 750 W. And I would like to have a line switch that =
is rated at least double or triple that Wattage value to be safe. I find =
that the rocker on the line switch will arc and shock my fingers wich is =
uncomfortable and I don't want to give that switch to a Faculty.
>=20
> I found a little, old line switch in my scrap parts bin that is rated =
at 10A @ 125V!! Here is a photo of it:
>=20
> =
http://physics.brown.edu/physics/userpages/staff/Gerald_Zani/linesw.JPG
>=20
> I will look through McMaster-Carr as Vacek suggested. - JZ
>=20
> On Tue, Dec 6, 2011 at 11:08 PM, Brian Holton =
wrote:
>=20
> 100A at 110VAC is not 750W. The line switch you showed is about 720W. =
If you want 100A at 110VAC - that's 11kW - you will have a very =
difficult time finding a line switch for that - Your line will have to =
be about a 1 gauge wire! That's about the size of the line cables that =
come into your house. What in the world are you powering?
>=20
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] =
On Behalf Of Paul Nord
> Sent: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 3:22 PM
> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> Cc: Paul Nord
> Subject: Re: [tap-l] Switch
>=20
> How about using a 100 A circuit breaker?
>=20
> Paul
>=20
> On Dec 6, 2011, at 1:07 PM, Dan Beeker wrote:
>=20
> =20
>=20
> Try =
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=3Dcord+switch&oe=3Dutf-8&rls=3Dor=
g.mozilla:en-US:official&client=3Dfirefox-a&um=3D1&ie=3DUTF-8&tbm=3Dshop&c=
id=3D8609489767376903715&sa=3DX&ei=3DoGDeTqK8PKrn0QHSgbWyBw&ved=3D0CHQQ8wI=
wAw
>=20
> Complete with extension cord.
>=20
> Or rated at 10A, 125V:
>=20
> Ideal Industries 774073
>=20
> http://www.alliedelec.com/search/productdetail.aspx?SKU=3D9882225
>=20
> Dan
>=20
> There is little market for a line switch that carries more than 300W =
as they are primarily used to turn on/off incandescent lamps. Should =
there be a fault, it takes a kot more engineering (and material) to keep =
a switch rated at 10+ amps from vaporizing in your hand than a switch =
rated at 3 amps.
>=20
> On 12/6/11 1:17 PM, Zani, Gerald wrote:
>=20
> George,
>=20
> No.
>=20
> I need a common line switch. But with a high current rating.
>=20
> The old line switches (circa ~1960) had very high current ratings. The =
new ones today are not rated as high but perhaps someone knows better?
>=20
> On Tue, Dec 6, 2011 at 12:28 PM, George Herold =
wrote:
>=20
> Sounds like you need one of those big AC power switches.. Like where =
the power comes into your house.
>=20
> George H.
>=20
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] =
On Behalf Of Zani, Gerald
> Sent: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 11:19 AM
> To: tap-l
> Subject: [tap-l] Switch
>=20
> Tappers,
>=20
> Where can I buy a beefy, Heavy Duty In-Line Lamp Cord style AC switch =
that can safely handle ~750 Watts (~100 amps @110VAC) or something as =
close as possible to this power rating?
>=20
> Something similar to:
>=20
> =
http://www.monstermarketplace.com/electronic-parts-and-speaker-cables/heav=
y-duty-in-line-lamp-cord-switch
>=20
>=20
> But with a higher current rating.
>=20
>=20
> My Tesla coil at 750 Watts is too powerful for my line switch.
>=20
>=20
>=20
> Thanks,
> - Jerry
>=20
> --
> Gerald Zani
> Demonstration Manager
> Physics
> Brown University
> (401) 863-3964
>=20
>=20
>=20
>=20
> --
> Gerald Zani
> Demonstration Manager
> Physics
> Brown University
> (401) 863-3964
>=20
> =20
>=20
> --
>=20
> Dan Beeker
>=20
>=20
>=20
>=20
> --
> Gerald Zani
> Demonstration Manager
> Physics
> Brown University
> (401) 863-3964
>=20
> =20
>=20
>=20
>=20
>=20
> --=20
> Dan Beeker
>=20
>=20
>=20
> --=20
> Excuse me if I ramble, I own a Nash.
>=20
> Bill Alexander
>=20
> (707) 826-0123
>=20


--Apple-Mail=_8EB37193-2580-4283-BE40-7AD19AED42CC
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
charset=windows-1252

I've =
long wanted to make (or find) a simple device which used a switch to =
control a much larger relay. The initial motivation for this was =
the Clapper which melted some internal contacts when I connected it to =
about 8 strands of Christmas lights. It would have an outlet and =
two plugs. One would be the power to the outlet (connected through =
the relay) and the other would power the relay and be connected to an =
external =
switch.PaulOn =
Dec 7, 2011, at 9:12 AM, Bill Alexander wrote:Hi =
Jerry,No, most foot switches aren't rated that high, usually =
using a microswitch. But it isn't that hard to include a relay of =
whatever size needed to handle the power. I made such a device just to =
plug in items I was working on so I could switch them on and off without =
moving my hands (perhaps holding probes on just the right =
positions).

Bill A.On Wed, Dec 7, 2011 at =
7:02 AM, Jerry Hester =
wrote:

I am a big fan of foot switches. This makes it =
impossible for Lecturers to leave things on for long periods as if the =
foot is not on the switch the power is off. For most things, =
I put the switch out of reach of the demos so that Lecturers can=92t=
operate the switch and touch the demo. I like this especially for =
the glowing pickle and conduction in glass demos. Unfortunately, =
for JZ, these are not typically rated for 750 =
W. Jerry H. From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of =
Dan Beeker

Sent: Wednesday, December 07, 2011 9:36 AMTo: tap-l@lists.ncsu.eduSubject: Re: =
[tap-l] Switch=


We have foot switches on our units. A little =
safer than a hand held switch as the possibility of electrocution is =
much reduced if the switch self destructs. And it leaves both hands free =
for more and better demos.

Dan Beeker On 12/7/11 8:29 AM, chuck britton wrote: =
I imagine that you're =
getting a good bit of 'inductive kickback' from the coil driver =
circuit.

You might consider a small project box =
in-line that has a robust switch as well as a 'line conditioner' module. =
A module such as is found near the switch of most hefty electronic =
devices.

.At 4:47 AM -0500 12/7/11, Zani, Gerald =
wrote:

Brian,I know that 100A @ 110VAC is not 750W. But what I mean to =
somehow describe to folks, however crudely is that I am switching on and =
off a Tesla coil that draws 750 W. And I would like to have a line =
switch that is rated at least double or triple that Wattage value to be =
safe. I find that the rocker on the line switch will arc and shock my =
fingers wich is uncomfortable and I don't want to give that switch to a =
Faculty.

I found a little, old line switch in my scrap parts bin that is =
rated at 10A @ 125V!! Here is a photo of it:http://physics.brown.edu/physics/userpages/staff/Gerald_=
Zani/linesw.JPG

I will look through McMaster-Carr as Vacek suggested. - =
JZOn =
Tue, Dec 6, 2011 at 11:08 PM, Brian Holton wrote:100A at 110VAC is not 750W. The line switch you =
showed is about 720W. If you want 100A at 110VAC - that's 11kW - you =
will have a very difficult time finding a line switch for that - Your =
line will have to be about a 1 gauge wire! That's about the size of the =
line cables that come into your house. What in the world are you =
powering?

From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of =
Paul Nord

Sent: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 3:22 PMTo: tap-l@lists.ncsu.eduCc: Paul =
NordSubject: Re: [tap-l] Switch

How about using a 100 A circuit =
breaker?

PaulOn =
Dec 6, 2011, at 1:07 PM, Dan Beeker =
wrote: Try http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=3Dcord+switch&a=
mp;oe=3Dutf-8&rls=3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official&client=3Dfirefox-a&=
amp;um=3D1&ie=3DUTF-8&tbm=3Dshop&cid=3D8609489767376903715&=
;sa=3DX&ei=3DoGDeTqK8PKrn0QHSgbWyBw&ved=3D0CHQQ8wIwAw

Complete with extension cord.Or rated at 10A, =
125V:Ideal Industries =
774073

http://www.alliedelec.com/search/productdetail.aspx?SKU=3D=
9882225

DanThere is little market for a line switch that carries =
more than 300W as they are primarily used to turn on/off incandescent =
lamps. Should there be a fault, it takes a kot more engineering (and =
material) to keep a switch rated at 10+ amps from vaporizing in your =
hand than a switch rated at 3 amps.

On 12/6/11 1:17 PM, Zani, Gerald =
wrote:George,No.I need a common line =
switch. But with a high current rating.

The old line switches (circa ~1960) had very high current ratings. =
The new ones today are not rated as high but perhaps someone knows =
better?On =
Tue, Dec 6, 2011 at 12:28 PM, George Herold =
wrote:Sounds like you need one of those big AC power =
switches.. Like where the power comes into your =
house.

George H.From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of =
Zani, Gerald

Sent: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 11:19 AMTo: =
tap-lSubject: [tap-l] =
SwitchTappers,

Where can I buy a beefy, Heavy Duty In-Line Lamp Cord style AC =
switch that can safely handle ~750 Watts (~100 amps @110VAC) or =
something as close as possible to this power rating?Something =
similar to:
http://www.monstermarketplace.com/electronic-parts-and-s=
peaker-cables/heavy-duty-in-line-lamp-cord-switch

But with a higher current rating.My =
Tesla coil at 750 Watts is too powerful for my line =
switch.Thanks,

- Jerry--Gerald ZaniDemonstration =
ManagerPhysicsBrown University(401) =
863-3964--Gerald=
ZaniDemonstration ManagerPhysicsBrown =
University(401) =
863-3964



--<=
/blockquote>Dan=
Beeker

--Gerald ZaniDemonstration =
ManagerPhysicsBrown University(401) =
863-3964

--=
Dan =
Beeker

-- Excuse me if I ramble, I own =
a Nash.Bill Alexander(707) =
826-0123
=

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