Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2011 13:13:48

Author: Doug Johnson

Subject: Re: waves on a string

Post:


It reminds me of the old Mac Computer Monitor with a tuning fork vibrating
in front of the screen. It made the tuning forks look like it had a
standing wave in it.

..Doug J.

On 2/15/11 11:04 AM, "Simcha Segev" wrote:

> Yes, its look like an interference pattern of the camera and string but
> anyway, it's a Fabulous video.
> Thanks to marty, Simcha
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
> Behalf Of Paul Nord
> Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 4:37 PM
> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> Cc: Paul Nord
> Subject: Re: [tap-l] waves on a string
>
> Re: yesterday's discussion of camera shutter speed
> Note the bright direct sunlight and the high contrast between the strings
> and the fingerboard.
>
> This is happening faster than the shutter speed, as you said. It's sort of
> an interference pattern between the scan lines on the CCD and the motion of
> the strings.
>
> Fantastic video, Marty. Thanks for sharing.
>
> Paul
>
> On Feb 14, 2011, at 11:26 PM, Martin Simon wrote:
>
>> Sorry to reply to my own post but now I see it is just an
>> artifact of the camera shutter that looks like a higher
>> harmonic, but really isn't. It must be oscillating in
>> the fundamental mode.
>>
>> I remember getting fooled by something similar at
>> the exploratorium. Still, it's a nice effect.
>>
>> Marty
>>
>> On 2/14/2011 8:48 PM, Martin Simon wrote:
>>> This video surprised me, because of all of the higher harmonics
>>> visible. When I look at bowed cello strings, they vibrate in the
>>> fundamental mostly, unless the cellist makes it otherwise.
>>> But these plucked base strings look totally higher harmonics.
>>> http://vimeo.com/4041788
>>>
>>>
>
>



From tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu Tue Feb 15 16:36:09 2011

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