Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2010 10:48:32

Author: Adam Beehler

Subject: Re: Atomic Trampoline - Whatever happened to these?

Post:

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Thanks, Cliff, but the point of ours is that the tool steel is
significantly better than the stainless steel and the amorphous steel if
significantly better than the tool steel. As David K. mentioned, the
initial bounce does not reveal much difference between the amorphous and
tool steel, but subsequent bounces is when the difference becomes very
apparent.
Adam Beehler


On 11/19/2010 8:26 AM, Cliff Bettis wrote:
>
> Adam,
>
> The tool steel needs to be case-hardened, not tempered. I had a 6 inch
> diametered piece machined into a shallow dish and then case-hardened;
> no tube necessary!
>
> Cliff
>
> *From:*tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu]
> *On Behalf Of *Adam Beehler
> *Sent:* Friday, November 19, 2010 8:01 AM
> *To:* tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> *Subject:* Re: [tap-l] Atomic Trampoline - Whatever happened to these?
>
> Hmmm...I see different results. I have stainless steel, tool steel
> (tempered), and amorphous steel (unless I was informed incorrectly).
> The results between each is dramatic!
> Adam Beehler
>
>
>
> On 11/18/2010 7:14 PM, david kardelis wrote:
>
> They don't do that much better than hardened steel. I have an old
> hardened steel one, the amorphous one and the kit had a plain steel.
> It amorphous surface bounces much better than the plain steel, but not
> that different than the hardened steel.
>
> dave
>
> On Thu, Nov 18, 2010 at 4:59 PM, Anthony Lapinski
> > wrote:
>
> No longer being made. I contacted the company directly several years ago.
> They can't find a new supplier for the specialized alloy.
>
> http://ice.chem.wisc.edu/Catalog/SciKits.htm#Anchor-Amorphous-62902
>
> Also see:
>
> http://mrsec.wisc.edu/Edetc/background/amorphous/index.html
>
> I saw one of these in the PIRA room at a summer meeting maybe five years
> ago. Wish I had purchased the kit back then, but I think they were around
> $65.
>
>
>
> tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu writes:
> >
> >I can't find any listings online. The one referenced below says that
> >it's out of stock.
> >
> >Does anyone know where these might still be available?
> >
> >Paul
> >
> >
> >On Sep 27, 2005, at 3:35 PM, A Gavrin wrote:
> >
> >> (sorry I lost the original message in this thread)
> >>
> >> Another possibility is the "Atomic Trampoline"
> >>
> >> This is a kit that consists of two lucite tubes each with a stainless
> >steel plug in the base. One plug has a thin amorphous metal disk spot
> >welded to it. You drop a ball bearing into each tube side by side. The
> >difference is quite striking. It works for the same reason as "regular"
> >glass does. The amorphous metal has no crystal structure, so it cannot
> >absorb energy easily by creating and moving dislocations.
> >>
> >> For the kit, go to
> >http://ice.chem.wisc.edu/catalogitems/ScienceKits.htm and scroll about
> >two thirds of the way down (or search for the word "amorphous.")
> >>
> >> You can see a movie of this at
> >http://www.liquidmetal.com/media/ball_bounce_DSL.mov
> >> (where they are pushing the technology for things like golf clubs).
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> Andrew D. Gavrin
> >> Associate Professor of Physics Associate Dean, IUPUI School of Science
> >> LD 222, 402 N. Blackford St.
> >> Indianapolis, IN 46202-3273
> >>
> >> 317-274-6909 (Phys)
> >> 317-274-0636 (Sci)
> >> agavrin@iupui.edu
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>


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Thanks, Cliff, but the point of ours is that the tool steel is
significantly better than the stainless steel and the amorphous
steel if significantly better than the tool steel. As David K.
mentioned, the initial bounce does not reveal much difference
between the amorphous and tool steel, but subsequent bounces is when
the difference becomes very apparent.
Adam Beehler


On 11/19/2010 8:26 AM, Cliff Bettis wrote:





Adam,

The tool steel needs to be case-hardened, not
tempered. I had a 6 inch diametered piece machined into a
shallow dish and then case-hardened; no tube necessary!

Cliff



From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
[mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of Adam
Beehler
Sent: Friday, November 19, 2010 8:01 AM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] Atomic Trampoline - Whatever
happened to these?



Hmmm...I see different results. I have
stainless steel, tool steel (tempered), and amorphous steel
(unless I was informed incorrectly). The results between each
is dramatic!
Adam Beehler



On 11/18/2010 7:14 PM, david kardelis wrote:
They don't do
that much better than hardened steel. I have an old hardened
steel one, the amorphous one and the kit had a plain steel. It
amorphous surface bounces much better than the plain steel,
but not that different than the hardened steel.

dave

On Thu, Nov 18, 2010 at 4:59 PM, Anthony
Lapinski
wrote:
No longer being made. I contacted the
company directly several years ago.
They can't find a new supplier for the specialized alloy.

http://ice.chem.wisc.edu/Catalog/SciKits.htm#Anchor-Amorphous-62902

Also see:

http://mrsec.wisc.edu/Edetc/background/amorphous/index.html

I saw one of these in the PIRA room at a summer meeting
maybe five years
ago. Wish I had purchased the kit back then, but I think
they were around
$65.




tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
writes:
>
>I can't find any listings online. The one
referenced below says that
>it's out of stock.
>
>Does anyone know where these might still be
available?
>
>Paul
>
>
>On Sep 27, 2005, at 3:35 PM, A Gavrin wrote:
>
>> (sorry I lost the original message in this
thread)
>>
>> Another possibility is the "Atomic Trampoline"
>>
>> This is a kit that consists of two lucite tubes
each with a stainless
>steel plug in the base. One plug has a thin
amorphous metal disk spot
>welded to it. You drop a ball bearing into each tube
side by side. The
>difference is quite striking. It works for the same
reason as "regular"
>glass does. The amorphous metal has no crystal
structure, so it cannot
>absorb energy easily by creating and moving
dislocations.
>>
>> For the kit, go to
>http://ice.chem.wisc.edu/catalogitems/ScienceKits.htm
and scroll about
>two thirds of the way down (or search for the word
"amorphous.")
>>
>> You can see a movie of this at
>http://www.liquidmetal.com/media/ball_bounce_DSL.mov
>> (where they are pushing the technology for
things like golf clubs).
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Andrew D. Gavrin
>> Associate Professor of Physics Associate Dean,
IUPUI School of Science
>> LD 222, 402 N. Blackford St.
>> Indianapolis, IN 46202-3273
>>
>> 317-274-6909 (Phys)
>> 317-274-0636 (Sci)
>> agavrin@iupui.edu
>>
>
>
>
>
>













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