Date: Thu, 28 Oct 2010 09:15:46

Author: Adam Beehler

Subject: Re: colors of butterflies or peacock feathers

Post:

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------060901070800000400010401
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hey Jerry, I did the same thing with beetle. It looks green in normal
white light, but depending on whether you view the reflected light off
the beetle's shell through a right-handed or left-handed circular
polarizer, the beetle looks black or dark red. Pretty cool!
Adam Beehler


On 10/28/2010 7:36 AM, Zani, Gerald wrote:
> Sam,
>
> I've recently been working with a faculty creating a new demo that
> uses a particular iridescent beetle shell to teach about circular
> polarization.
>
> Briefly, this beetle shell has a type of biochemical and
> biophysical structure that produces a wavelength selective, circularly
> polarized reflection. The reflected light from the beetle shell has
> circular polarization one preferred direction of handedness.
>
> I don't know if the iridescent colors of a Peacock feather or
> a butterfly's wing have the same wavelength selective circular
> polarization property or if the property of their colors is caused by
> the same or a similar biophysical and biochemical mechanism.
>
>
> It is a striking Physics demo because it has a lot of beauty. - Jerry
>
> On Wed, Oct 27, 2010 at 6:32 PM, Sam Sampere > wrote:
>
> How do you use them??? What exactly do you mean by selective
> scattering??? Exactly how are these things 'engineered' ? And by
> whom??? :)
>
> Sam
>
> ________________________________________
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
> [tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
> ] On Behalf Of Adam Beehler
> [beehler@physics.utah.edu ]
> Sent: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 5:04 PM
> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> Subject: Re: [tap-l] colors of butterflies or peacock feathers
>
> I have. I love that stuff! I think only one other instructor has
> ever
> used them, though.
> Adam Beehler
>
>
> On 10/27/2010 2:00 PM, Dale E. Stille wrote:
> > Tappers,
> >
> > Anyone out there use peacock feathers or Morpho butterfly wing
> > examples to talk about structural colors or wavelength selective
> > scattering of light?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Dale Stille
> > U of Iowa
>
>


--------------060901070800000400010401
Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit







Hey Jerry, I did the same thing with beetle. It looks green in
normal white light, but depending on whether you view the reflected
light off the beetle's shell through a right-handed or left-handed
circular polarizer, the beetle looks black or dark red. Pretty
cool!
Adam Beehler


On 10/28/2010 7:36 AM, Zani, Gerald wrote:
Sam,


I've recently been working with a faculty creating a new demo
that uses a particular iridescent beetle shell to teach about
circular polarization.


Briefly, this beetle shell has a type of biochemical and
biophysical structure that produces a wavelength selective,
circularly polarized reflection. The reflected light from the
beetle shell has circular polarization one
preferred direction of handedness.


I don't know if the iridescent colors of a Peacock feather or
a butterfly's wing have the same wavelength selective circular
polarization property or if the property of their colors is
caused by the same or a similar biophysical and biochemical
mechanism.




It is a striking Physics demo because it has a lot of beauty.
- Jerry

On Wed, Oct 27, 2010 at 6:32 PM, Sam
Sampere
wrote:
How do you use them??? What exactly do
you mean by selective scattering??? Exactly how are these
things 'engineered' ? And by whom??? :)

Sam

________________________________________
From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
[tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu]
On Behalf Of Adam Beehler [beehler@physics.utah.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 5:04 PM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] colors of butterflies or peacock
feathers

I have. I love that stuff! I think only one other
instructor has ever
used them, though.
Adam Beehler


On 10/27/2010 2:00 PM, Dale E. Stille wrote:
> Tappers,
>
> Anyone out there use peacock feathers or Morpho
butterfly wing
> examples to talk about structural colors or wavelength
selective
> scattering of light?
>
> Thanks,
> Dale Stille
> U of Iowa









--------------060901070800000400010401--

From tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu Thu Oct 28 13:17:46 2010
Received: from psmtp.com (na3sys009amx204.postini.com [74.125.149.44])
by uni00ml.unity.ncsu.edu (8.13.7/8.14.4/Nv6.2010.0805) with SMTP id o9SHHiYD025871

Back