Date: Sun, 3 Oct 2010 12:17:46 +

Author: --- Urs Lauterburg

Subject: Re: Portland Demo Show

Post:

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Stan,

A really great show that you have brought on there! The various
extraordinary and skillfully performed acts must have really
impressed the audience. As all of the performed activities include
lot's of physics it could be taken as a great appetizer to get
involved in the field.

However for me, the question about to what degree you want to blend
artistic achievements by individual human beings (mainly intended to
stimulate human emotions) with a deeper understanding of the
fundamental laws of nature (physics) is an important one. As longer I
am engaged in the teaching of physics to the younger ones, the
farther I get away from the show aspects and the more I would try to
concentrate on the isolated effects and make them stand out as much
as possible. These effects are sometimes spectacular and
astonishingly crisp. They could be as simple as the recently
discussed synchronized arrival of two heavy steel balls falling along
different paths or the sudden freezing of water if you lower the
pressure above the water surface. Over the years I have really tried
to isolate the effects we look at as much as possible and to show
them in the most appealing and understandable ways possible. For this
I don't hesitate to use modern data acquisition and lighting
techniques combined with video camera display methods.

I guess what I want to say is that a carefully balanced mixture of
showtime and teaching can be inspiring, but it's important that we
emphasize the later, even if it demands a more intensive and serious
involvement from our students.

It was nice to watch the AAPT Summer Portland Demo Show on the
Vernier website. It would have been even more exiting to see it live
on stage this past summer of 2010 in Portland. Great job to put it
all together and to show that sensuousness has indeed a strong
relationship with physics too.

Congratulation Stan and thank you for sharing the video document.

Urs

PS: What does ''Vaudeville'' actually stand for?

Urs Lauterburg
Physics demonstrator
Physikalisches Institut
University of Bern
Switzerland

>If anyone would like to re-visit the AAPT Summer Portland Demo Show, you can.
>
>There are two places you can get the video.
>
>The video is on our University of Oregon Web Channel. You can
>download various size videos from there.
>
>You can link to it from.
>
>http://www.uoregon.edu/~stanm/VaudevillePhysics/
>
>Or you can go and get the video from Vernier's Website:
>
>http://www.vernier.com/news/2010/08/23/the-physics-of-vaudeville-video/
>
>Again thanks to Vernier Software who made the whole thing possible.
> My hope is the show continues to inspire the use of performance for
>outreach activities and shows so we can influence larger audiences,
>not just ones interested in Science.
>
>I have DVDs available if someone wants to send me a self addressed
>return envelope to make it easy on this end.
>
>Have a good year!
>
>Stan
>
>

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Stan,

A really great show that you have brought on there! The various
extraordinary and skillfully performed acts must have really impressed
the audience. As all of the performed activities include lot's of
physics it could be taken as a great appetizer to get involved in the
field.

However for me, the question about to what degree you want to blend
artistic achievements by individual human beings (mainly intended to
stimulate human emotions) with a deeper understanding of the
fundamental laws of nature (physics) is an important one. As longer I
am engaged in the teaching of physics to the younger ones, the farther
I get away from the show aspects and the more I would try to
concentrate on the isolated effects and make them stand out as much as
possible. These effects are sometimes spectacular and astonishingly
crisp. They could be as simple as the recently discussed synchronized
arrival of two heavy steel balls falling along different paths or the
sudden freezing of water if you lower the pressure above the water
surface. Over the years I have really tried to isolate the effects we
look at as much as possible and to show them in the most appealing and
understandable ways possible. For this I don't hesitate to use modern
data acquisition and lighting techniques combined with video camera
display methods.

I guess what I want to say is that a carefully balanced mixture of
showtime and teaching can be inspiring, but it's important that we
emphasize the later, even if it demands a more intensive and serious
involvement from our students.

It was nice to watch the AAPT Summer Portland Demo Show on the
Vernier website. It would have been even more exiting to see it live
on stage this past summer of 2010 in Portland. Great job to put it all
together and to show that sensuousness has indeed a strong
relationship with physics too.

Congratulation Stan and thank you for sharing the video document.

Urs

PS: What does ''Vaudeville'' actually stand for?

Urs Lauterburg
Physics demonstrator
Physikalisches Institut
University of Bern
Switzerland

If anyone would like to re-visit the AAPT
Summer Portland Demo Show, you can.

There are two places you can get the
video.

The video is on our University of Oregon
Web Channel. You can download various size videos from
there.

You can link to it from.

http://www.uoregon.edu/~stanm/VaudevillePhysics/

Or you can go and get the video from
Vernier's Website:

http://www.vernier.com/news/2010/08/23/the-physics-of-vaudeville-video/

Again thanks to Vernier Software who made
the whole thing possible. My hope is the show continues to
inspire the use of performance for outreach activities and shows so we
can influence larger audiences, not just ones interested in
Science.

I have DVDs available if someone wants to
send me a self addressed return envelope to make it easy on this
end.

Have a good year!

Stan





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