Date: Wed Oct 7 20:43:53 2009

Author: RICHARD HECKATHORN

Subject: Re: Richard Feynman

Post:

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John, Don't you have any addition books? I've read them all at one time or =
another.

Dick
----- Original Message -----
From: John Hubisz=20
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Sent: Wed, 7 Oct 2009 15:08:02 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: [tap-l] Richard Feynman




=20
=20


Do they know any of these folks and texts? - John Hubisz

What is Energy?
From Physics
for the Inquiring Mind by Eric M.
Rogers we read
=20
"We
shall now start with a very earthy, and rather vague, de=C2=ADscription of
energy as
something we pay for, the product of fuel."
From PSSC
Physics by
Uri Haber-Schaim and others we read
"For the moment we shall
say that energy is the essential thing
involved in jobs - not the creation of energy but its transfer from one
form to
another."
From Development of concepts of physics
by Arnold
B. Arons we read
"'Energy'
is not a substance, fluid, paint, or fuel which is smeared on bodies
and rubbed
off from one to another. We use this
term to denote a construct - numbers, calculated in a cer=C2=ADtain
prescribed way,
that are found by theory and experiment to preserve a remarkably simple
relationship in very diverse physi=C2=ADcal phenomena."
From The Feynman Lectures on
Physics by Feynman, Leighton, and Sands we read
"It is
important to
realize that in physics today, we have no knowledge of what energy is. We =
do not have a picture that energy comes in
little blobs of a definite amount. It is
not that way. However, there are
formulas for calculating some numerical
quantity, and when we add it all together it gives '28' - always the same n=
umber.=20
It is
an abstract thing in that it does not tell us the mechanism or the
reasons for
the various formulas.


David Willey wrote:
This just happened and caused me to pause.
=20

An hour ago I took a survey of the students in my calculus based
Physics 1 class, there's just over 30 of them and they are mostly
sophomore engineers, with a couple of science majors. We are just
beginning Conservation of Energy and I was about to read a quote from
Chp 4 of Feynman's lectures.
=20

=20

None, not one, had ever heard of Richard Feynman. Should this worry me?
=20

=20

Cheers,
=20

David
=20

P.S. Part of their homework this week end is to write half a page on
Feynman. I wonder how many copies of the Wikipedia page I'll get.
=20






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John, Don't you have any addi=
tion books? I've read them all at one time or another.

Dick
-----=
Original Message -----
From: John Hubisz
To:=
tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Sent: Wed, 7 Oct 2009 15:08:02 -0400 (EDT)
Subj=
ect: Re: [tap-l] Richard Feynman





&=
nbsp;


Do they know any of these folks and texts? - John Hu=
bisz

*What is* *Energy?*=


From *Physics=
for the Inquiring Mind *by Eric M.
Rogers we read

=




"We
shall now start with a very earthy= , and rather vague, de=C2=ADscription of
energy as
something we pay f= or, the product of fuel."


From *PSSC
Physics *by
Uri= Haber-Schaim and others we read


"For the moment we shall
say that energy is the essent= ial thing
involved in jobs - not = the creation of energy but its transfer from one
form to
another."


From *Development of concepts of physics
*by Arnold
B. Aro= ns we read


"'Energy'
is not a substance, fluid, pa= int, or fuel which is smeared on bodies
and rubbed
off from one to an= other. We use this
term to denote a construct - numbe= rs, calculated in a cer=C2=ADtain
prescribed way,
that are found by t= heory and experiment to preserve a remarkably simple
relationship in ver= y diverse physi=C2=ADcal phenomena."


From *The Feynman Lectures on
Physics *by Feynman, Leighton, = and Sands we read

<=
br>

"It is
important to
realize that in physics today, we have n= o knowledge of what energy
is. We do not have a picture = that energy comes in
little blobs of a definite amount. It is
not that way. However, there are
formulas= for calculating some numericalquantity, and when we add it all
together it gives '28' - always the same number.
It is=
an abstract thing in that it does not tell us the mechanism or the
r= easons for
the various formulas.


David Willey wrote:


This just happened and caused me to pause.


An= hour ago I took a survey of the students in my calculus based
Physics 1= class, there's just over 30 of them and they are mostly
sophomore engin= eers, with a couple of science majors. We are just
beginning Conservatio= n of Energy and I was about to read a quote from
Chp 4 of Feynman's lect= ures.




None, not one, had ever he= ard of Richard Feynman. Should this
worry me?


=

Cheers,


David


P= .S. Part of their homework this week end is to write half a page
onFeynman. I wonder how many copies of the Wikipedia page I'll get.
&nbs= p;





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