Date: Thu Oct 22 17:47:57 2009 ** **Back to Contents ** ------------------------------------------------------------------------ **

Author: J. Terrence Klopcic

Subject: Re: Hearing Aids over the Phone (branched from Physics of

Post:

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Dick,

Thank you.

Terry

P.S. Thanks also for authoring "The Physics of Sound". I'm using it as
the text for an independent study that I'm teaching - to a music major -
and have never enjoyed teaching a course more. The experiments
discussed are fascinating to people who have never isolated those
effects before. For example, we just experienced binaural beats and
compared them to traces on a digital oscilloscope (including the
addition of traces). Way cool!


* J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
Director of Laboratories
Departments of Physics and Mathematics
Kenyon College*



Richard Berg wrote:
> Terry,
>
> Look at the McGurk effect:
>
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/services/demos/demosh5/h5-49.htm
>
> Dick
>
> On Thu, 22 Oct 2009, J. Terrence Klopcic wrote:
>
>> Bill,
>>
>> When you visited, could your uncle see your mouth when you spoke? It is
>> amazing how much our speech understanding is enhanced - unwittingly - by
>> being able to see the words (especially the consonants?) being formed.
>> I have particularly noticed this phenomenon when talking to non-native
>> English speakers. Facing the listener makes a noticeable difference in
>> understanding.
>>
>> Terry
>>
>> J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
>> Director of Laboratories
>> Departments of Physics and Mathematics
>> Kenyon College
>>
>>
>>
>> Bill Norwood wrote:
>>
>> Hi Taplers,
>> I recently attempted coordination over the ordinary telephone with my
>> uncle, now mid eighties, and he with his new hearing aid could hardly
>> understand anything I said. Then I visited a few days later and there
>> was virtually no problem with his hearing during our interchange. Is
>> the ability of telephones that limited in picking up and transmitting
>> voice spectra? Anybody understand this?
>> Bill Norwood, U of MD at College Park.
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu]
>> On Behalf Of Richard Berg
>> Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2009 11:23 AM
>> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
>> Subject: Re: [tap-l] Physics of music
>>
>> I agree with Andrew.. The frequencies are in the correct range to
>> create
>> the appropriate vocal formants, and this is not too different from the
>> idea of a cochlear implant, where far fewer frequencies of noise are
>> used
>> to create recognizable vocal formants.
>>
>> Dick
>>
>> On Thu, 22 Oct 2009, Andrew Morrison wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> Really? Why not? If you close your eyes or otherwise don't look at
>> the subtitles, the consonant sounds (forgot the proper speech term
>> this morning) are nearly indistinguishable, but the vowel sounds
>> (which are formed by the formant frequencies) are still there. I
>> think that your brain is able to fill in the missing information with
>> the help of the text, and you understand the speech.
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 21, 2009 at 2:09 PM, John Welch
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> I'm not sure I buy this one.
>>
>> Scott Thomas wrote:
>>
>>
>> Neat demo...
>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=muCPjK4nGY4
>> ...but not sure if I could build this one very easily.
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> ******************************
>> John Welch
>>
>> Cabrillo College Physics Dept.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ***********************************************************************
>> Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
>> Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
>> U.S. mail address:
>> Department of Physics
>> University of Maryland
>> College Park, MD 20742-4111
>> Phone: (301) 405-5994
>> FAX: (301) 314-9525
>> e-mail reberg@umd.edu
>> www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
>> ***********************************************************************
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
> ***********************************************************************
> Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
> Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
> U.S. mail address:
> Department of Physics
> University of Maryland
> College Park, MD 20742-4111
> Phone: (301) 405-5994
> FAX: (301) 314-9525
> e-mail reberg@umd.edu
> www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
> ***********************************************************************

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Dick,



Thank you.



Terry



P.S. Thanks also for authoring "The Physics of Sound". I'm using it
as the
text for an independent study that I'm teaching - to a music major -
and have never enjoyed teaching a course more. The experiments
discussed are fascinating to people who have never isolated those
effects before. For example, we just experienced binaural beats and
compared them to traces on a digital oscilloscope (including the
addition of traces). Way cool!





**
*** J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
Director of Laboratories
Departments of Physics and Mathematics
Kenyon College*

**

**



Richard Berg wrote:
**
> **Terry,
>
> Look at the McGurk effect:
>
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/services/demos/demosh5/h5-49.htm
>
> Dick
>
> On Thu, 22 Oct 2009, J. Terrence Klopcic wrote:
>
> **
>> **Bill,
>>
>> When you visited, could your uncle see your mouth when you spoke? It is
>> amazing how much our speech understanding is enhanced - unwittingly - by
>> being able to see the words (especially the consonants?) being formed.
>> I have particularly noticed this phenomenon when talking to non-native
>> English speakers. Facing the listener makes a noticeable difference in
>> understanding.
>>
>> Terry
>>
>> J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
>> Director of Laboratories
>> Departments of Physics and Mathematics
>> Kenyon College
>>
>>
>>
>> Bill Norwood wrote:
>>
>> Hi Taplers,
>> I recently attempted coordination over the ordinary telephone with my
>> uncle, now mid eighties, and he with his new hearing aid could hardly
>> understand anything I said. Then I visited a few days later and there
>> was virtually no problem with his hearing during our interchange. Is
>> the ability of telephones that limited in picking up and transmitting
>> voice spectra? Anybody understand this?
>> Bill Norwood, U of MD at College Park.
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu]
>> On Behalf Of Richard Berg
>> Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2009 11:23 AM
>> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
>> Subject: Re: [tap-l] Physics of music
>>
>> I agree with Andrew.. The frequencies are in the correct range to
>> create
>> the appropriate vocal formants, and this is not too different from the
>> idea of a cochlear implant, where far fewer frequencies of noise are
>> used
>> to create recognizable vocal formants.
>>
>> Dick
>>
>> On Thu, 22 Oct 2009, Andrew Morrison wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> Really? Why not? If you close your eyes or otherwise don't look at
>> the subtitles, the consonant sounds (forgot the proper speech term
>> this morning) are nearly indistinguishable, but the vowel sounds
>> (which are formed by the formant frequencies) are still there. I
>> think that your brain is able to fill in the missing information with
>> the help of the text, and you understand the speech.
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 21, 2009 at 2:09 PM, John Welch
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> I'm not sure I buy this one.
>>
>> Scott Thomas wrote:
>>
>>
>> Neat demo...
>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=muCPjK4nGY4
>> ...but not sure if I could build this one very easily.
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> ******************************
>> John Welch
>>
>> Cabrillo College Physics Dept.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ***********************************************************************
>> Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
>> Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
>> U.S. mail address:
>> Department of Physics
>> University of Maryland
>> College Park, MD 20742-4111
>> Phone: (301) 405-5994
>> FAX: (301) 314-9525
>> e-mail reberg@umd.edu
>> www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
>> ***********************************************************************
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> **
> **
> ***********************************************************************
> Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
> Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
> U.S. mail address:
> Department of Physics
> University of Maryland
> College Park, MD 20742-4111
> Phone: (301) 405-5994
> FAX: (301) 314-9525
> e-mail reberg@umd.edu
> www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
> ***********************************************************************
> **

**--------------030504080303040201030605--

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**

**

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