Date: Thu Oct 22 14:00:37 2009

Author: J. Terrence Klopcic

Subject: Re: Hearing Aids over the Phone (branched from Physics of

Post:

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Bill,

When you visited, could your uncle see your mouth when you spoke? It is
amazing how much our speech understanding is enhanced - unwittingly - by
being able to see the words (especially the consonants?) being formed.
I have particularly noticed this phenomenon when talking to non-native
English speakers. Facing the listener makes a noticeable difference in
understanding.

Terry

* J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
Director of Laboratories
Departments of Physics and Mathematics
Kenyon College*



Bill Norwood wrote:
> Hi Taplers,
> I recently attempted coordination over the ordinary telephone with my uncle, now mid eighties, and he with his new hearing aid could hardly understand anything I said. Then I visited a few days later and there was virtually no problem with his hearing during our interchange. Is the ability of telephones that limited in picking up and transmitting voice spectra? Anybody understand this?
> Bill Norwood, U of MD at College Park.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of Richard Berg
> Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2009 11:23 AM
> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> Subject: Re: [tap-l] Physics of music
>
> I agree with Andrew.. The frequencies are in the correct range to create
> the appropriate vocal formants, and this is not too different from the
> idea of a cochlear implant, where far fewer frequencies of noise are used
> to create recognizable vocal formants.
>
> Dick
>
> On Thu, 22 Oct 2009, Andrew Morrison wrote:
>
>
>> Really? Why not? If you close your eyes or otherwise don't look at
>> the subtitles, the consonant sounds (forgot the proper speech term
>> this morning) are nearly indistinguishable, but the vowel sounds
>> (which are formed by the formant frequencies) are still there. I
>> think that your brain is able to fill in the missing information with
>> the help of the text, and you understand the speech.
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 21, 2009 at 2:09 PM, John Welch wrote:
>>
>>> I'm not sure I buy this one.
>>>
>>> Scott Thomas wrote:
>>>
>>>> Neat demo...
>>>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=muCPjK4nGY4
>>>> ...but not sure if I could build this one very easily.
>>>>
>>>>
>>> --
>>> ******************************
>>> John Welch
>>>
>>> Cabrillo College Physics Dept.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>
> ***********************************************************************
> Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
> Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
> U.S. mail address:
> Department of Physics
> University of Maryland
> College Park, MD 20742-4111
> Phone: (301) 405-5994
> FAX: (301) 314-9525
> e-mail reberg@umd.edu
> www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
> ***********************************************************************
>
>

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Bill,



When you visited, could your uncle see your mouth when you spoke? It
is amazing how much our speech understanding is enhanced - unwittingly
- by being able to see the words (especially the consonants?) being
formed. I have particularly noticed this phenomenon when talking to
non-native English speakers. Facing the listener makes a noticeable
difference in understanding.



Terry



**
*** J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
Director of Laboratories
Departments of Physics and Mathematics
Kenyon College*

**

**



Bill Norwood wrote:
**
> ** **
> **Hi Taplers,
> I recently attempted coordination over the ordinary telephone with my uncle, now mid eighties, and he with his new hearing aid could hardly understand anything I said. Then I visited a few days later and there was virtually no problem with his hearing during our interchange. Is the ability of telephones that limited in picking up and transmitting voice spectra? Anybody understand this?
> Bill Norwood, U of MD at College Park.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of Richard Berg
> Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2009 11:23 AM
> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> Subject: Re: [tap-l] Physics of music
>
> I agree with Andrew.. The frequencies are in the correct range to create
> the appropriate vocal formants, and this is not too different from the
> idea of a cochlear implant, where far fewer frequencies of noise are used
> to create recognizable vocal formants.
>
> Dick
>
> On Thu, 22 Oct 2009, Andrew Morrison wrote:
>
> **
> ** **
>> ** **
>> **Really? Why not? If you close your eyes or otherwise don't look at
>> the subtitles, the consonant sounds (forgot the proper speech term
>> this morning) are nearly indistinguishable, but the vowel sounds
>> (which are formed by the formant frequencies) are still there. I
>> think that your brain is able to fill in the missing information with
>> the help of the text, and you understand the speech.
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 21, 2009 at 2:09 PM, John Welch wrote:
>> **
>> ** **
>>> ** **
>>> **I'm not sure I buy this one.
>>>
>>> Scott Thomas wrote:
>>> **
>>> ** **
>>>> ** **
>>>> **Neat demo...
>>>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=muCPjK4nGY4
>>>> ...but not sure if I could build this one very easily.
>>>>
>>>> **
>>>> ** **
>>> ** **
>>> **--
>>> ******************************
>>> John Welch
>>>
>>> Cabrillo College Physics Dept.
>>>
>>>
>>> **
>>> ** **
>> ** **
> ** **
>
> *************************************************************************
> Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
> Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
> U.S. mail address:
> Department of Physics
> University of Maryland
> College Park, MD 20742-4111
> Phone: (301) 405-5994
> FAX: (301) 314-9525
> e-mail reberg@umd.edu
> www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
> ***********************************************************************
>
> **

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**

**

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