Date: Thu Aug 27 12:37:48 2009 Back to Contents ------------------------------------------------------------------------

Author: Paul Doherty

Subject: Re: Sound Bites

Post:


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Hi Daniel

We have this exhibit at the Exploratorium. And Don Rathjen created
the Snack for it.
Simply drill a small hole in a pencil or dowel and tightly shove the
shaft from a cheap DC motor into the hole.
Then play music into the DC motor. The shaft will quiver in tune with
the music and vibrate the shaft.
Slip a straw over the pencil for sanitation and you are good to go.


Paul D






On Aug 27, 2009, at 2:48 AM, Daniel Kaplan wrote:

> I just came back from a vacation in London where I visited their
> Science museum. One of the exhibits would be cool to reproduce in
> my high school class as a demo that the students could "bite
> into". The demo consisted of a thin metal rod that was held
> horizontally at one end by some sort of apparatus. The workings of
> the apparatus were not visible.
>
> The user was told to unwrap a clean straw from a stack of available
> straws (they had special straws that were shorter than usual - I
> could have the student cut down a standard straw) and slide it over
> the rod. The next step was to put your fingers in your ears and
> bite on the straw. You could then clearly hear some local radio
> station.
>
> This is a great demo to show how sound is a transmitted vibration.
> To set this up I will need a mechanism to hold the rod quite
> stiffly but still be able to transmit vibrations to it. I was
> thinking I would try mounting a small speaker on a rod. Maybe if I
> remove the cone portion of the speaker I could get vibrations
> without too much sound. transmitted through the air.
>
> Does anyone have suggestions about how to accomplish this? Or has
> anyone built a similar demo that they could share some of the details?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Dr. Daniel Kaplan
> Physics Teacher
> Matawan Regional High School, Aberdeen, NJ
>


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Hi Daniel

We have = this exhibit at the Exploratorium. And Don Rathjen created the
Snack for = it.
Simply drill a small hole in a pencil or dowel and tightly = shove the
shaft from a cheap DC motor into the hole.
Then play = music into the DC motor. The shaft will quiver in tune with
the music = and vibrate the shaft.
Slip a straw over the pencil for = sanitation and you are good to go.


Paul D






On Aug 27, = 2009, at 2:48 AM, Daniel Kaplan wrote:

I just came back from a = vacation in London where I visited their
Science museum.=A0 One of the = exhibits would be cool to reproduce
in my high school class as a demo = that the students could "bite
into".=A0 The demo consisted of a thin = metal rod that was held
horizontally at one end by some sort of = apparatus. The workings of
the apparatus were not=A0visible. =
=A0
The user was told to=A0unwrap a clean straw from a stack of =
available straws (they had special straws that were shorter than
usual - = I could have the student cut down a standard straw) and
slide it over = the rod. The next step was to put your fingers in
your ears and bite on = the straw.=A0 You could then clearly hear
some local radio station. =
=A0
This is a great demo to show how sound is a transmitted = vibration.
To set this up I will need a mechanism to hold the rod quite =
stiffly but still be able to transmit vibrations to it.=A0 I was =
thinking I would try mounting a small speaker on a rod.=A0 Maybe if
I = remove the cone portion of the speaker I could get vibrations
without = too much sound. transmitted through the air.
=A0
Does anyone have suggestions about how to accomplish this? Or = has
anyone built a similar demo that they could share some of the = details?
=A0
Thanks.
=A0
Dr. Daniel = Kaplan
Physics Teacher
Matawan Regional High School, Aberdeen, = NJ
=A0


=

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From tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu Thu Aug 27 12:37:48 2009

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