Date: Tue Dec 23 10:25:57 2008

Author: J. Terrence Klopcic

Subject: A Cool Variant of the Metronome Coupled Oscillator

Post:

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------070406000204040102040506
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

This is way cool!

I bought five of the TakTell Super Mini metronomes and, using a
styrofoam beam and two empty beer cans, easily duplicated the demo that
Wolfgang gave us. (By the way, thanks Wolfgang. Your video constituted
the only sales pitch I needed in order to justify buying the
metronomes.) While I was showing off the demo, Ben Schumacher -
renowned Quantum Information theorist and member of the Kenyon Physics
faculty - came up with a most cool variant. He brought in a paper plate
("Chinette"(?) a strong but light paper composite plate) and a package
of ping pong balls. The plate was turned upside down over the balls and
the metronomes were placed around the upper surface plate producing a
rotationally coupled set of oscillators. It works beautifully. In
fact, the metronomes seem to sync faster in the rotational mode than
when linearly arranged on the styrofoam beam and cans.

But it gets better. When, instead of five metronomes equally spaced
around the perimeter, we reduced the number to four, we introduced a
number of new symmetries. (Five items have only point symmetry; four
has a couple of line symmetries.) As a result, the four metronome
arrangement has both rotational and linear modes - and mode-switching
was very evident.

A word of caution. These things are highly addictive. Don't start
playing with them when you have deadlines looming.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from chilly but still beautiful rural
Central Ohio.

Terry

--
* J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
Director of Laboratories
Departments of Physics and Mathematics
Kenyon College*


--------------070406000204040102040506
Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit






This is way cool!

I bought five of the TakTell Super Mini metronomes and, using a
styrofoam beam and two empty beer cans, easily duplicated the demo that
Wolfgang gave us. (By the way, thanks Wolfgang. Your video
constituted the only sales pitch I needed in order to justify buying
the metronomes.) While I was showing off the demo, Ben Schumacher -
renowned Quantum Information theorist and member of the Kenyon Physics
faculty - came up with a most cool variant. He brought in a paper
plate ("Chinette"(?) a strong but light paper composite plate) and a
package of ping pong balls. The plate was turned upside down over the
balls and the metronomes were placed around the upper surface plate
producing a rotationally coupled set of oscillators. It works
beautifully. In fact, the metronomes seem to sync faster in the
rotational mode than when linearly arranged on the styrofoam beam and
cans.

But it gets better. When, instead of five metronomes equally spaced
around the perimeter, we reduced the number to four, we introduced a
number of new symmetries. (Five items have only point symmetry; four
has a couple of line symmetries.) As a result, the four metronome
arrangement has both rotational and linear modes - and mode-switching
was very evident.

A word of caution. These things are highly addictive. Don't start
playing with them when you have deadlines looming.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from chilly but still beautiful
rural Central Ohio.

Terry

--



J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD

Director of Laboratories

Departments of Physics and Mathematics

Kenyon College





--------------070406000204040102040506--

Back