Date: Tue Oct 7 12:34:49 2008

Author: J. Terrence Klopcic

Subject: Re: in need of some good multimeters

Post:

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Santos,

Yes, that's it.

(Of course, I never bought them from Mouser. I can't remember what
Fluke charges - but it is in the $6 range. Still a lot more than normal
cartridge fuses.)

Thank you.

Terry

* J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
Director of Laboratories
Departments of Physics and Mathematics
Kenyon College*



Santos Ramirez wrote:
> Googled and this is what I found. (thought $32.30 was really high)
> Is this the same fuse you are using.
>
> ******************************************************
> http://www.testpath.com/Items/Fuse-11A-1000V-10x38mm-FA-116-230.htm
>
> Fluke Fuse DMM 11A
> Fuse, 11A, 1,000V, 10x38mm, FA
> Brand: Fluke
> Model: Fuse DMM 11A
> Part #: 116-230
> Price: $8.10
> Status: In Stock
>
>
>
> Replacement Fluke meter fuse for the Fluke meters shown below. Fluke
> references meter fuse holders by the markings "F1", "F2" or "F3." Since
> Fluke meter fuses may be used in different meters, in different fuse
> positions, we have listed in the chart below for each meter the correct
> fuse position. Fuse measures 10mm x 38mm and is a fast-acting, "fast blow"
> type fuse. Fast blow fuses are not appropriate for protecting equipment
> from voltage surges on standard AC power lines.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> Chuck,
>>
>> I'm afraid that "non-standard" was not the appropriate term. I was
>> specifically thinking of the fuses used in our Fluke 177 multimeters.
>> They use Buss DMM - 11A and Buss DMM - .44A fuses. At Mouser, these are
>> priced respectively at $32.30 and $26.38 apiece! (Fortunately, Fluke
>> sells them somewhat cheaper.)
>>
>> I have learned that there is a reason for the super-expensive fuses in
>> the Fluke 177. The instrument is an industrial quality device to be
>> used where there are seriously dangerous voltage/currents hanging
>> around. The fuses are designed, not only to open fast, but to absorb a
>> hand grenade worth of energy while opening. So, I suppose that I have
>> to pay the cost of industrial safety to get industrial ruggedness.
>>
>> But a teaching lab instrument need not be designed with such power in
>> mind. Ideally, someone will/does make a multimeter with Fluke quality,
>> but designed for more mundane applications.
>>
>> Thanks for encouraging me to do a little more research.
>>
>> Terry
>>
>> * J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
>> Director of Laboratories
>> Departments of Physics and Mathematics
>> Kenyon College*
>>
>>
>>
>> chuck britton wrote:
>>
>>> Can you give us an example of manufacturers using 'non-standard' fuses?
>>>
>>> The great thing about standards is that we have so many to choose
>>> among ;-)
>>> It is becoming more and more common to find the EU standards pushing
>>> the old US standards aside - and for good reason.
>>> EU = metric and MUCH more globally accepted.
>>>
>>> On Oct 6, 2008, at Oct 6(Mon) 12:06 , J. Terrence Klopcic wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> And while you're at it, how about insisting that the manufacturers
>>>> use standard, available-at-RadioShack-for-under-a-buck fuses, instead
>>>> of the buy-them-from-the-manufacturer-at-half-the-cost-of-the-meter
>>>> rare jobbies that we find in some multimeters.
>>>>
>>>> Terry
>>>>
>>>> * J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
>>>> Director of Laboratories
>>>> Departments of Physics and Mathematics
>>>> Kenyon College*
>>>>
>
>
>

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Santos,

Yes, that's it.

(Of course, I never bought them from Mouser. I can't remember what
Fluke charges - but it is in the $6 range. Still a lot more than
normal cartridge fuses.)

Thank you.

Terry




J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD

Director of Laboratories

Departments of Physics and Mathematics

Kenyon College




Santos Ramirez wrote:

Googled and this is what I found. (thought $32.30 was really high)
Is this the same fuse you are using.

******************************************************
http://www.testpath.com/Items/Fuse-11A-1000V-10x38mm-FA-116-230.htm

Fluke Fuse DMM 11A
Fuse, 11A, 1,000V, 10x38mm, FA
Brand: Fluke
Model: Fuse DMM 11A
Part #: 116-230
Price: $8.10
Status: In Stock



Replacement Fluke meter fuse for the Fluke meters shown below. Fluke
references meter fuse holders by the markings "F1", "F2" or "F3." Since
Fluke meter fuses may be used in different meters, in different fuse
positions, we have listed in the chart below for each meter the correct
fuse position. Fuse measures 10mm x 38mm and is a fast-acting, "fast blow"
type fuse. Fast blow fuses are not appropriate for protecting equipment
from voltage surges on standard AC power lines.








Chuck,

I'm afraid that "non-standard" was not the appropriate term. I was
specifically thinking of the fuses used in our Fluke 177 multimeters.
They use Buss DMM - 11A and Buss DMM - .44A fuses. At Mouser, these are
priced respectively at $32.30 and $26.38 apiece! (Fortunately, Fluke
sells them somewhat cheaper.)

I have learned that there is a reason for the super-expensive fuses in
the Fluke 177. The instrument is an industrial quality device to be
used where there are seriously dangerous voltage/currents hanging
around. The fuses are designed, not only to open fast, but to absorb a
hand grenade worth of energy while opening. So, I suppose that I have
to pay the cost of industrial safety to get industrial ruggedness.

But a teaching lab instrument need not be designed with such power in
mind. Ideally, someone will/does make a multimeter with Fluke quality,
but designed for more mundane applications.

Thanks for encouraging me to do a little more research.

Terry

* J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
Director of Laboratories
Departments of Physics and Mathematics
Kenyon College*



chuck britton wrote:


Can you give us an example of manufacturers using 'non-standard' fuses?

The great thing about standards is that we have so many to choose
among ;-)
It is becoming more and more common to find the EU standards pushing
the old US standards aside - and for good reason.
EU = metric and MUCH more globally accepted.

On Oct 6, 2008, at Oct 6(Mon) 12:06 , J. Terrence Klopcic wrote:



And while you're at it, how about insisting that the manufacturers
use standard, available-at-RadioShack-for-under-a-buck fuses, instead
of the buy-them-from-the-manufacturer-at-half-the-cost-of-the-meter
rare jobbies that we find in some multimeters.

Terry

* J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
Director of Laboratories
Departments of Physics and Mathematics
Kenyon College*











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