Date: Tue Oct 7 09:38:08 2008

Author: Zani, Gerald

Subject: Re: in need of some good multimeters

Post:

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Tappers,

=20

You could buy a Fuse Buddy for each DMM and leave them permanently
connected.

=20

Are people familiar with Fuse Buddies? - JZ

=20

From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
Behalf Of J. Terrence Klopcic
Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 9:32 AM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] in need of some good multimeters

=20

Chuck,

I'm afraid that "non-standard" was not the appropriate term. I was
specifically thinking of the fuses used in our Fluke 177 multimeters.
They use Buss DMM - 11A and Buss DMM - .44A fuses. At Mouser, these are
priced respectively at $32.30 and $26.38 apiece! (Fortunately, Fluke
sells them somewhat cheaper.)

I have learned that there is a reason for the super-expensive fuses in
the Fluke 177. The instrument is an industrial quality device to be
used where there are seriously dangerous voltage/currents hanging
around. The fuses are designed, not only to open fast, but to absorb a
hand grenade worth of energy while opening. So, I suppose that I have
to pay the cost of industrial safety to get industrial ruggedness. =20

But a teaching lab instrument need not be designed with such power in
mind. Ideally, someone will/does make a multimeter with Fluke quality,
but designed for more mundane applications.

Thanks for encouraging me to do a little more research.

Terry

J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
Director of Laboratories
Departments of Physics and Mathematics
Kenyon College



chuck britton wrote:=20

Can you give us an example of manufacturers using 'non-standard' fuses?

=20

The great thing about standards is that we have so many to choose among
;-)

It is becoming more and more common to find the EU standards pushing the
old US standards aside - and for good reason.

EU =3D metric and MUCH more globally accepted.

=20

On Oct 6, 2008, at Oct 6(Mon) 12:06 , J. Terrence Klopcic wrote:





And while you're at it, how about insisting that the manufacturers use
standard, available-at-RadioShack-for-under-a-buck fuses, instead of the
buy-them-from-the-manufacturer-at-half-the-cost-of-the-meter rare
jobbies that we find in some multimeters.

Terry

J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD
Director of Laboratories
Departments of Physics and Mathematics
Kenyon College

=20


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Tappers,



You could buy a Fuse Buddy for each DMM and leave them
permanently connected.



Are people familiar with Fuse Buddies? - =
JZ







From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
[mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of J. Terrence =
Klopcic
Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 9:32 AM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] in need of some good =
multimeters







Chuck,

I'm afraid that "non-standard" was not the appropriate =
term. I
was specifically thinking of the fuses used in our Fluke 177 =
multimeters.
They use Buss DMM - 11A and Buss DMM - .44A fuses. At Mouser, =
these are priced
respectively at $32.30 and $26.38 apiece! (Fortunately, Fluke =
sells them
somewhat cheaper.)

I have learned that there is a reason for the super-expensive fuses in =
the
Fluke 177. The instrument is an industrial quality device to be =
used
where there are seriously dangerous voltage/currents hanging =
around. The
fuses are designed, not only to open fast, but to absorb a hand grenade =
worth
of energy while opening. So, I suppose that I have to pay the cost =
of
industrial safety to get industrial ruggedness.

But a teaching lab instrument need not be designed with such power in
mind. Ideally, someone will/does make a multimeter with Fluke =
quality,
but designed for more mundane applications.

Thanks for encouraging me to do a little more research.


Terry




J. Terrence Klopcic, PhD

Director of Laboratories

Departments of Physics and Mathematics

Kenyon College





chuck britton wrote:



Can you give us an example of manufacturers using
'non-standard' fuses?











The great thing about standards is that we have so =
many to
choose among ;-)





It is becoming more and more common to find the EU =
standards
pushing the old US standards aside - and for good reason.





EU =3D metric and MUCH more globally =
accepted.









On Oct 6, 2008, at Oct 6(Mon) 12:06 , J. Terrence =
Klopcic
wrote:







And =
while you're
at it, how about insisting that the manufacturers use standard,
available-at-RadioShack-for-under-a-buck fuses, instead of the
buy-them-from-the-manufacturer-at-half-the-cost-of-the-meter rare =
jobbies that
we find in some multimeters.

=

Terry



=
;
J. =
Terrence
Klopcic, PhD

Director of Laboratories

Departments of Physics and Mathematics

Kenyon College













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