Date: Mon Oct 6 03:06:35 2008

Author: Marc \ Zeke\" Kossover"

Subject: Re: request for books for HS kids

Post:

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Asimov's short essays on physics are great. His long work, Understanding Physics, is great too, but I'm talking more about his shorter essays. "Behind the Teacher's Back", for example, is one of the best introductions to particle physics out there, and "The Light That Failed" is a great essay on the Michelson-Morley experiment that showed that the ether doesn't exist. For what it is worth, these essays inspired me, and a bunch of my classmates, to study science. Some are dated, but most are still perfectly appicable.

Brancazio's book _Sport Science_ is an excellent introduction to using physics to solve real world sports problems. Weird units, but a great work.

J. Gordon's _The New Science of Strong Materials_ is from the 80's but is still cutting edge. His follow up book, _Structures_ is simply the best introduction to structures there is. His ideas were at one time considered heretical, but now he is totally mainstream.

Ramachandran's Phantom's in the Brain is maybe the best introduction to cognitive science outside of Oliver Sacks and has better science.

Zeke Kossover



----- Original Message ----
From: George Collison
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Sent: Sunday, October 5, 2008 9:22:25 PM
Subject: [tap-l] request for books for HS kids


Hi,

I'm looking for some good reads _about_ physics or engineering, not "teaching" books about physics concepts or study guides.
I want to engage kids in the process of viewing the world as a physicist or engineer. Primarily I'm looking to spark imagination.
HS kids cannot, rather will not, wade through long, detailed biographies. I'm looking for materials that have the gems lying closer to the surface.

References to good online lists gratefully accepted.

Physics:
Einstein's autobiography is one that fits this bill, There is a collection of his letters/correspondence also.

Brief history of time is another.

Feynman has some texts.

Kagu has some neat volumes.

There is a "physics of NASCAR"

Got recs for physics of any sport?

Anything readable by a HS student on Oppenheimer?


Engineering? I'm coming up totally flat.

There is a new book on the building of the dome of the cathedral in Florence.

Any books by engineers you might recommend? "Existential pleasures of Engineering" seems a bit dated but it has the right tone.

Any readable books on biomedical engineering, rather the insights or experiences of a biomedical engineer?

Anything readable on physics and architecture?


Any books that may be attractive to female students?

Galileo's Daughter is a tad too cerebral - one needs too much context to read it. That is my opinion; perhaps I'm wrong. Educate me.

Most materials on Lisa Meitner are really tough going.

Materials on Marie Curie, the ones that I read, did not really engage the reader. Any suggestions?

Thanks,

George



--0-549762394-1223276796=:86643
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii

Asimov's short essays on physics are great. His long work, Understanding Physics, is great too, but I'm talking more about his shorter essays. "Behind the Teacher's Back", for example, is one of the best introductions to particle physics out there, and "The Light That Failed" is a great essay on the Michelson-Morley experiment that showed that the ether doesn't exist. For what it is worth, these essays inspired me, and a bunch of my classmates, to study science. Some are dated, but most are still perfectly appicable.Brancazio's book _Sport Science_ is an excellent introduction to using physics to solve real world sports problems. Weird units, but a great work.J. Gordon's _The New Science of Strong Materials_ is from the 80's but is still cutting edge. His follow up book,
_Structures_ is simply the best introduction to structures there is. His ideas were at one time considered heretical, but now he is totally mainstream.Ramachandran's Phantom's in the Brain is maybe the best introduction to cognitive science outside of Oliver Sacks and has better science. Zeke Kossover----- Original Message ----From: George Collison To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.eduSent: Sunday, October 5, 2008 9:22:25 PMSubject: [tap-l] request for books for HS kids








Hi,

I'm looking for some good reads _about_ physics or engineering, not "teaching" books about physics concepts or study guides.
I want to engage kids in the process of viewing the world as a physicist or engineer. Primarily I'm looking to spark imagination.
HS kids cannot, rather will not, wade through long, detailed biographies. I'm looking for materials that have the gems lying closer to the surface.

References to good online lists gratefully accepted.

Physics:
Einstein's autobiography is one that fits this bill, There is a collection of his letters/correspondence also.

Brief history of time is another.

Feynman has some texts.

Kagu has some neat volumes.

There is a "physics of NASCAR"

Got recs for physics of any sport?

Anything readable by a HS student on Oppenheimer?


Engineering? I'm coming up totally flat.

There is a new book on the building of the dome of the cathedral in Florence.

Any books by engineers you might recommend? "Existential pleasures of Engineering" seems a bit dated but it has the right tone.

Any readable books on biomedical engineering, rather the insights or experiences of a biomedical engineer?

Anything readable on physics and architecture?


Any books that may be attractive to female students?

Galileo's Daughter is a tad too cerebral - one needs too much context to read it. That is my opinion; perhaps I'm wrong. Educate me.

Most materials on Lisa Meitner are really tough going.

Materials on Marie Curie, the ones that I read, did not really engage the reader. Any suggestions?

Thanks,

George







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