Date: Thu Oct 30 00:08:32 2008

Author: Bernard Cleyet

Subject: Re: absorption spectra

Post:

> and you can always (safely) watch a solar spectrum with its
> wonderful Fraunhofer lines
>

only if the glasses absorb the IR.


On 2008, Oct 29, , at 10:49, Paul Doherty wrote:

> HI Anthony
>
> Tidy bowl liquid uses Holmium Chloride which has a narrow
> absorption band
>
> Didymium glass (used by glassblowers has a narrow absorption band
> in the yellow.)
>
> The same didymium glass is sold as a color enhancing filter for
> camera use.
>
> and you can always (safely) watch a solar spectrum with its
> wonderful Fraunhofer lines
>
> Paul D
>
>
>
>
> On Oct 29, 2008, at 9:26 AM, Anthony Lapinski wrote:
>
>> In my high school astronomy class, I will be discussing light and
>> spectra
>> soon. I wish to do a lab/activity where students can analyze
>> various light
>> sources with a diffraction grating. It is easy to show continuous
>> spectra
>> with a candle or light bulb, and emission spectra with gas tubes.
>> I am
>> looking for a way to show an absorption spectrum. In the past I had
>> students use colored filters to cover an incandescent light bulb.
>> This
>> sort of mimics the atmosphere of a star.
>>
>> Does anyone have other ways to show absorption spectra using simple
>> materials?
>>
>
>


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