Date: Tue Oct 21 16:11:52 2008

Author: Paul Nord

Subject: Re: irradiation

Post:

That's true. A broken clock could run backwards and therefore be
right four times a day. If it ran fast enough, it could be right all
the time.

Let's visualize the Venn diagram on the question of fools being
right. Divide a paper in half with a vertical line down the center.
Put all correct statements on the right and incorrect statements on
the left. Now draw two circles, one representing statements made by
experts and another representing statements made by fools. If you
draw that fairly, there should be 8 subsections on the paper.
Included should be a region for 'True statements made by fools and not
made by experts.' Probably a small region. But it still exists.

The food industry claims that irradiated food should be considered
"safe until proven dangerous."
Many consumer advocates want irradiated food to be considered
"dangerous until proven safe."
One of the groups is right. Perhaps both are right on certain points.

That's all I meant by it.

PN

On Oct 21, 2008, at 2:30 PM, Bernard Cleyet wrote:

> I thought it would be understood there are at least two classes of
> claimants -- I suggested comparing their interests.
>
>
> Regarding clocks, only a non operating clock is correct twice a day.
>
> bc still doesn't understand the fool point.
>
>
> On 2008, Oct 21, , at 10:03, Paul Nord wrote:
>
>> I should apologize to Bernard that the list. That was a rather
>> rude way to make my point. It would have been easier to pick on
>> myself. Please turn the statement around and apply it to me. The
>> joke works equally well that way too.
>>
>> Of course Bernard, you are correct that there is good reason to
>> suspect the questions raised by lobbyists and people with something
>> to gain from the topic at hand. But that doesn't mean that they
>> are wrong. A broken clock is exactly right twice a day. And
>> that's more often than most clocks.
>>
>> Paul
>>
>>
>> On Oct 21, 2008, at 11:27 AM, Paul Nord wrote:
>>
>>> Exactly my point!
>>>
>>> Begin forwarded message:
>>>
>>>>> But even a fool can be right.
>>>>>
>>>> I don't understand; please explain.
>>>
>>
>>
>



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