Date: Tue Aug 12 10:36:12 2008

Author: Pati Sievert

Subject: Re: Video Codecs for Classroom Computer

Post:

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I agree with Jerry that the first course is to hold the vendor responsible.

That said, [and more than you asked for] what they install most likely would
not play video downloaded from YouTube. (Mozilla Firefox has freeware [more
than one] that allows you to do this.) I use VLCPortable; It is on my flash
drive and plays just about video download from the web. I went looking for
it to help out some teachers in a district where they are very restricted on
web sites they are allowed to access at school. Downloading the video also
allows you to control the context. [Not entirely sure this falls under fair
use or not.] I'm not on the computer with Firefox or the download plug-in on
it and cannot remember the name, but its icon on the tool bar is a fish and
it is really simple to use.
Pati

On Tue, Aug 12, 2008 at 8:25 AM, wrote:

> I have just gotten some new computers for 3 classrooms (grant money). I
> ordered them with a DVD player and specified that they should have the
> software to play DVDs, but that turned out not to be the case. Windows media
> player gave me the usual cryptic message indicating that I needed additional
> software. I know I can make this work if I install WinDVD or tsomething
> simililar, but my problem is that people want to show all sorts of media and
> there always seems to be the need to go looking for another player or video
> codec (usually at the last moment when you have to throw computer security
> to the cyberwind).
>
> So what I am wondering is whether I should install something like K-Lite (
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K-Lite_Codec_Pack) and maybe cover most
> possible video formats from the beginning.
>
> Cliff
>
>


--
Pati Sievert
STEM Outreach Coordinator
Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, IL 60115
815-753-1201

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Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline

I agree with Jerry that the first course is to hold the vendor responsible.

That said, [and more than you asked for] what they install most likely would not play video downloaded from YouTube. (Mozilla Firefox has freeware [more than one] that allows you to do this.) I use VLCPortable; It is on my flash drive and plays just about video download from the web. I went looking for it to help out some teachers in a district where they are very restricted on web sites they are allowed to access at school. Downloading the video also allows you to control the context. [Not entirely sure this falls under fair use or not.] I'm not on the computer with Firefox or the download plug-in on it and cannot remember the name, but its icon on the tool bar is a fish and it is really simple to use.

Pati
On Tue, Aug 12, 2008 at 8:25 AM, wrote:
I have just gotten some new computers for 3 classrooms (grant money). I ordered them with a DVD player and specified that they should have the software to play DVDs, but that turned out not to be the case. Windows media player gave me the usual cryptic message indicating that I needed additional software. I know I can make this work if I install WinDVD or tsomething simililar, but my problem is that people want to show all sorts of media and there always seems to be the need to go looking for another player or video codec (usually at the last moment when you have to throw computer security to the cyberwind).
So what I am wondering is whether I should install something like K-Lite (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K-Lite_Codec_Pack) and maybe cover most possible video formats from the beginning.
Cliff-- Pati SievertSTEM Outreach CoordinatorScience, Technology, Engineering, & MathNorthern Illinois UniversityDeKalb, IL 60115815-753-1201


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