Date: Sun Apr 20 20:41:07 2008

Author: Bernard Cleyet

Subject: Re: harmonics

Post:
Here's another source:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5355450

Somewhere there is a video of his talk "The Physics of Brass
Musical ...."

http://209.85.165.104/search?q=cache:-G34_7hi6V4J:ccrma.stanford.edu/
courses/150/lectures08/HolmesBrasses.ppt+%22brian+holmes%22+OR+%
22brian+w.+holmes%22+horn+physics&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=4&gl=us

Try asking him?

horncabbage@aol.com

bc thinks a duplicatre, or was it on PHYS-L?



On 2008, Apr 15, , at 17:28, Richard Berg wrote:
>
> "....the harmonics determine the quality of sound from a musical
> instrument."
>
> Anthony,
>
> I think it is a bit more complicated than this. In fact, most of
> the orchestral wind instruments function as "open tube" systems,
> and have basically the same harmonic structure - all of the
> overtones, with amplitudes that generally decrease with harmonic
> number and are reasonably similar to each other. This includes:
> flute, oboe, bassoon, trumpet, saxophone, and even violin. It does
> not include the clarinet family, which function as a closed tube
> and thus emphasize the odd harmonics for low harmonic number.
> There are differences in the spectra of these instruments, but the
> differences do not always account fof the differences in timbre or
> tone quality.
>
> A more important determinant in the tone quality between these
> instruments is in fact their attack transients. If you were to mix
> and match the attack transients of various instruments and their
> steady state tones, you would find that the dominant effect in tone
> quality is the attack transient period. For example, if you edit a
> trumpet tone onto the attack transient of the oboe for the same
> note, all other things being equal (for example, vibrato) you would
> usually identify the tone as belonging to the oboe. I have always
> wanted to make a sample audiotape with this experiment, but have
> never really had the opportunity and the equipment.
>
> On the other hand, I have prepared a number of Question of the Week
> entries for the future that deal with how the harmonic spectrum
> affects the sound of a wave, including application to instruments
> and to the human voice. Some of these are now on the web and some
> are future Questions, but I guess no one will care if you get an
> early look.
>
> Comparison of standard electronic wave shapes, their spectra, and
> their sounds:
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/outreach/QOTW/new/q325.htm
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/outreach/QOTW/new/a325.htm
>
> Comparison of three instruments with very distinctive tone quality:
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/outreach/QOTW/new/q326.htm
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/outreach/QOTW/new/a326.htm
>
> Comparison of vocal formants for three vowel sounds in a male voice:
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/outreach/QOTW/new/q327.htm
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/outreach/QOTW/new/a327.htm
>
> Similarity of formants for various sung frequencies:
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/outreach/QOTW/new/q328.htm
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/outreach/QOTW/new/a328.htm
>
> Comparison of standard waves with their synthesis:
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/services/demos/demosh4/h4-01.htm
>
> Comparison of musical instruments with similar sounding electronic
> waves:
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/services/demos/demosh4/h4-04.htm
>
> Identification of vocal formants:
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/services/demos/demosh6/h6-02.htm
>
> Sound spectrograms of vowel sounds:
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/services/demos/demosh6/h6-08.htm
>
> The word "WOW" with its spectrum as performed on a small
> synthesizer and a male voice:
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/services/demos/demosh6/h6-06.htm
>
> The McGurk Effect:
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/services/demos/demosh5/h5-49.htm
>
> There is a good book that goes into this whole business in much
> more detail: The Physics of Sound, third edition, by Richard E.
> Berg and David G. Stork, published by Pearson/Prentice-Hall (1982,
> 1995, 2005). Actually, most Physics of Music textbooks will have
> some commentary on this issue.
>
> I hope this sheds more light and sound than heat on the question at
> hand.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Dick
>
> **********************************************************************
> * Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
> Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
> U.S. mail address:
> Department of Physics
> University of Maryland
> College Park, MD 20742-4111
> Phone: (301) 405-5994
> FAX: (301) 314-9525
> e-mail reberg@umd.edu
> www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
> **********************************************************************
> *
>
>


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