Date: Fri Feb 29 03:40:14 2008 Back to Contents

Author: Robert T McQuaid

Subject: Greece Tour n 'Lab?'

Post:

February 28, 2008

Eric Chester
etchester92@yahoo.com
c/o tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu

Subject: Greece Tour n 'Lab?'

You wrote:

> While I am not going, all my Physics students are going
> on an international school trip to Greece. This trip is
> primarily focused on history (Greek history, Christian
> church history, etc).
>
> I would like to be the rotten teacher and have my
> students perform a lab over there (most likely it would
> be observation focused due to limited resources). For
> example, how do newtons laws apply to a specific arch or
> column? Or estimate the amount of force needed to place
> the stone on top of the column as well as "how" you
> would accomplish this.
>
> While these seem (well) ok, they feel more like busy
> work than something the students will think is fun and
> exciting.
>
> Any thoughts?

Most of us know the earth is round only by trusting
authority, few of have done any observation personally
to prove it. In all personal experiences the earth is
flat.

I suggest having students record the time of sunrise,
sunset or midday at home. Then without resetting
watches (or correcting for the hours of change in their
watches) record the time of the same event in Greece.
Is there any way the difference can be explained on a
flat earth?

Robert T McQuaid
Mattawa Ontario Canada
amateur astronomer



From tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu Fri Feb 29 03:40:14 2008

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