Date: Thu Dec 20 10:13:54 2007

Author: Paul Nord

Subject: Re: Did you hear about this Microwave Oven...?

Post:
Jerry,

I hear people make this statement, "The century of physics has not
ended." They then proceed to give some justification; the exciting
research going on, emerging theories, new instrumentation. If it has
ended, it will not be going away quietly.

But my question is: Why do you feel the need to defend it?

Paul


And he said, "Who told you that you were naked?"
- Gen. 3:11a


On Dec 20, 2007, at 12:23 AM, Bernard Cleyet wrote:

> "Around the turn of the century, a popular notion was that the
> century of physics had ended and this would be the century of
> biology. I think that article makes it very clear that as
> biological knowledge advances, physics will be there, right
> alongside, explaining how and why it happens... "
>
> This was the subject of the commencement address about 1965 by
> Chancellor Cheadle (UCSB) at Santa Barbara City College. I didn't
> believe him, but it has come to pass. Just compare the respective
> govt. budgets for physics and biology. Instructive is also the
> comparative incomes of the bio. industry and electronics in silicon
> Valley.
> bc
>
> Jerry DiMarco wrote:
>
>> There seemed to be two separate themes in that article. One
>> was about how microwave cooking can alter or destroy nutrients.
>> The other was about effects that are what I would term more
>> mystical in nature. I have no problem with the former, I'm sure
>> those effects are well documented. I don't think the same can be
>> said about the latter. Does this invalidate one's work? In terms
>> of being persuasive, you certainly make things difficult for
>> yourself when you venture into undocumented territory. The usual
>> result is that you open the floodgates for all sorts of
>> undocumented claims, and then the discussion founders. What was
>> the point you wanted us to get?
>> The article you cited by the biophysicist was interesting.
>> Around the turn of the century, a popular notion was that the
>> century of physics had ended and this would be the century of
>> biology. I think that article makes it very clear that as
>> biological knowledge advances, physics will be there, right
>> alongside, explaining how and why it happens...
>>
>> Jerry
>
>
> cut



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