Date: Thu Aug 30 18:27:57 2007

Author: Paul Nord

Subject: Re: macintosh lab management

Post:

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Eric,

The "Parental Controls" actually lock down the Mac pretty darn well.
A non-administrative user has no authority to install software. And
the parental controls allow you to prevent changing most other
settings - Like prevent modification to the dock. And you can
lockout certain applications. My only gripe with it is that it
doesn't let you lock the desktop background.

For a more robust lockdown, set a firmware password to prevent
booting from CD or external drive.

A better choice would be to manage the systems with an OS X Server.
The server software allows you to micromanage the user. The server
management lets you lock out a lot more things; even the desktop
background.

For recovery of a foobar-ed system, connect it to another working
computer with a firewire cable and run the migration utility.

Paul

On Aug 30, 2007, at 4:13 PM, Eric Ayars wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> Despite being a long-term Mac-user, I've never had to deal with an
> entire lab full of Macintoshes before. We have three lab-rooms full
> of Macs now, and I'm stuck! What software do you recommend for
> maintaining a Mac's default state? In other words, what could I use
> so that even if a student fubars the 'lab' user directory on a
> machine, the directory gets set back to the default state
> overnight, or next time it's booted, or something.
>
> The Windows equivalent for what we need is "DeepFreeze" or
> something like that, if that helps. The linux equivalent is
> a .tar.gz file of the lab directory with an appropriate crontab
> entry, which I've tried on these Macs but can't seem to get working
> properly.
>
> Thanks for any help,
> -ea
>
> -- --- ----- ------- ----------- -------------
> Dr. Eric Ayars
> Assistant Professor of Physics
> California State University, Chico
> ayars@mailaps.org
>
>


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The "Parental Controls" =
actually lock down the Mac pretty darn well.=A0 A non-administrative =
user has no authority to install software.=A0 And the parental controls =
allow you to prevent changing most other settings - Like prevent =
modification to the dock. =A0And you can lockout certain applications. =
=A0My only gripe with it is that it doesn't let you lock the desktop =
background.For=
a more robust lockdown, set a firmware password to prevent booting from =
CD or external drive.A better choice would be to =
manage the systems with an OS X Server.=A0 The server software allows =
you to micromanage the user.=A0 The server management lets you lock out =
a lot more things; even the desktop background.For recovery of a foobar-ed =
system, connect it to another working computer with a firewire cable and =
run the migration utility.Paul=
On Aug 30, 2007, at 4:13 PM, Eric Ayars wrote:Hello =
all,Despite being =
a long-term Mac-user, I've never had to deal with an entire lab full of =
Macintoshes before. We have three lab-rooms full of Macs now, and I'm =
stuck! What software do you recommend for maintaining a Mac's default =
state? In other words, what could I use so that even if a student fubars =
the 'lab' user directory on a machine, the directory gets set back to =
the default state overnight, or next time it's booted, or =
something.The =
Windows equivalent for what we need is "DeepFreeze" or something like =
that, if that helps. The linux equivalent is a .tar.gz file of the lab =
directory with an appropriate crontab entry,=A0which I've tried on these =
Macs but can't seem to get working properly.Thanks for any =
help,-ea ayars@mailaps.org =
=

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