Date: Wed Aug 29 12:18:33 2007

Author: Perry Godwin

Subject: Re: Question of the Week - Thank You!

Post:
Yes, that makes a lot of sense since from a distance you might not be able to see the screw spin. What did you make the aluminum flags out of?

Perry Godwin
Physics Lab Technician
Lansing Community College
Email: godwip@lcc.edu
Tel: (517) 483-9653
Cell: (517) 927-2155
Pgr: (517) 232-0278
Fax: (517) 483-1003


-----Original Message-----
From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of Daniel A Margulies
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2007 10:24 AM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] Question of the Week - Thank You!

The flag is there simply to make the rotation more easily visible in the
video.

dan

On Wed,
29 Aug 2007, Perry Godwin wrote:

> In the demonstration shown in the links below, I am curious as to why the aluminum flags were added to where the magnet is stuck to the screw? When I have done this experiment previously, I just used a nickel-plated neodymium magnet, a flat-head wood screw, a battery, and a wire. I held the wire against the side of the magnet to operate.
>
> Also, for the hallway display case version of this demo, how was the wire going to be held in contact with the magnet?
>
> Perry Godwin
> Physics Lab Technician
> Lansing Community College
> Email: godwip@lcc.edu
> Tel: (517) 483-9653
> Cell: (517) 927-2155
> Pgr: (517) 232-0278
> Fax: (517) 483-1003
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of Douglas Johnson
> Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2007 12:14 PM
> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> Subject: [tap-l] Question of the Week - Thank You!
>
>
> I wanted to publicly thank Dick Berg for his excellent demo website
> and his insightful "Questions of the Week", as well as his wonderful
> answers to those questions. What a great service to us all and an
> inspiration to all who read them!
>
> His question about the Unipolar Motor has inspired me to make it a
> hallway display cabinet demo. By hooking the motor to a momentary
> switch, the viewer could read the question, think about the answer,
> and push the button, then see the results. A very low cost and low
> maintenance interactive display that really tests one's physics. So
> far, everyone that has viewed it loves it! I should also say, there
> is more to it than meets the eye. I love the fact the motor is so
> easy for people to build and that it works every time!
>
> Thanks again Dick, I have known of this demo for many years, but it
> was your great question that got me inspired! ...Doug J.
>
>
> Weblinks are below to see what I am talking about..
>
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/outreach/QOTW/active/q284.htm
>
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/outreach/QOTW/active/a284.htm
>
> http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/services/demos/demosk4/k4-51.htm
>
>
>

Dan Margulies
University of Maryland, College Park
Physics Lecture Demonstration Group
301.405.5996

---------------------------------

"Go over to the physics department and take a look at a real scientist's
laboratory here on Earth. It looks just like the space station, only
much worse."

- Some guy on the internet





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