Date: Fri Aug 24 15:52:53 2007

Author: Gerald Zani

Subject: Re: Circuit breakers

Post:
--=====================_5390703==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dale,

Usually circuit breakers are better than fuses.

In your home the answer is yes, you can replace a 30 amp fuse with a 30 amp breaker. It is better if you replace all your fuses and use breakers.

For protecting scientific equipment my understanding is that it can be quite different than just replacing a fuse box in your home.

The timing for when the breaker trips can change and will be different than the timing for when the equivalent fuse may blow.

Thermal circuit breakers can be used for both AC and DC currents and are usually the best general purpose type of circuit protection device.

Magnetic circuit breakers can be faster than thermal breakers, but they cannot work for both AC and DC currents, they can be prone to tripping too easily and the delay time will be susceptible temperature variations.

So a breaker is not always a 1:1 replacement for a fuse inside scientific equipment. - JZ

At 02:46 PM 8/24/2007, you wrote:

>Tappers and electrical gurus,
>
>Can I substitute a 30 amp circuit breaker for a 30 amp fuse???? OR, should the circuit breaker be of a lower value.
>
>Later,
>Dale

--=====================_5390703==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"



Dale,
Usually circuit breakers are better than fuses.
In your home the answer is yes, you can replace a 30 amp fuse with a 30
amp breaker. It is better if you replace all your fuses and use
breakers.
For protecting scientific equipment my understanding is that it can be
quite different than just replacing a fuse box in your home.
The timing for when the breaker trips can change and will be different
than the timing for when the equivalent fuse may blow.
Thermal circuit breakers can be used for both AC and DC currents and are
usually the best general purpose type of circuit protection
device.
Magnetic circuit breakers can be faster than thermal breakers, but they
cannot work for both AC and DC currents, they can be prone to tripping
too easily and the delay time will be susceptible temperature
variations.
So a breaker is not always a 1:1 replacement for a fuse inside scientific
equipment. - JZ
At 02:46 PM 8/24/2007, you wrote:
Tappers and electrical
gurus,
Can I substitute a 30 amp circuit breaker for a 30 amp fuse???? OR,
should the circuit breaker be of a lower value.
Later,
Dale



--=====================_5390703==.ALT--



Back