Date: Mon Mar 5 14:41:42 2007

Author: John Welch

Subject: Re: how does this work!?!

Post:
It doesn't seem all that complicated to me - the banana cables on both
sides go off the screen, so all you'd have to do is connect a power
supply to the centers of the off-screen cables. No cutting of the film
required, or special posts in the candles - just someone under the table
with a power supply and alligator clips that cut through the cable
insulation.

trappe@physics.utexas.edu wrote:
> Each candle has a post from the bottom up its center. Each nail is
> inserted in the sides to make contact with the post. The candle is
> then placed with its post making contact with the electrode under its
> location. The switch was already described as being under the table
> and turned on or off while the candle is lit or blown out.
>
> Wireless transmission as Bill suggests or even a shaded pole Thompson
> motor would be more impressive. Hide the Elihu Thompson apparatus
> inside a box and place the loop with the lightbulb on top of the box
> We do that in the E&M show as a curiosity. We have the audience chant
> a mantra of Hmmmmm to cover the sound of the primary hum. When the
> audience stops hmmm'ing we say the apparatus stores hum. Most figure
> out there is something in the box, and we uncover it to show the AC
> transformer (Thompson shaded pole motor). That gets us a lead-in to
> the transmitter-receiver with antenna. Of course, you can mess with
> that one by holding the receiver antenna at 90 degrees to the
> transmitter (actually showing polarization) because nothing happens
> until they are aligned. Karl
>
> Quoting William Beaty :
>
>>
>> Note that the perpetrator on metacafe.com has now made $1,426 from this
>> hoax.
>>
>> I've done the same trick in the past using a 1KW 1MHz source. In the
>> nearfield of the short antenna, if we connect two clipleads to a #49
>> bulb,
>> the bulb will light via capacitive coupling. No video cuts or hidden
>> switches. But if we want to run a DC motor, a diode bridge is required.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sat, 3 Mar 2007, William Beaty wrote:
>>
>>> On Sat, 3 Mar 2007, Zach Adler wrote:
>>>
>>> > Does anybody know how this thing works? I've been racking my brain,
>>> > and have no idea...
>>> > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLzaOdFDo-E
>>>
>>> That's because it's a hoax. Or call it "stage magic" to be kind.
>>>
>>> What's the point of this lie? Well on metacafe.com, you can make
>>> money by
>>> attracting attention to your video, and that's the site where that
>>> video
>>> originated. Dishonest science projects make far more money than real
>>> ones.
>>>
>>> Hmmmm. I could make money there too. Hide a Tesla coil primary
>>> under a
>>> table, then show how you can light a small pilot lamp by winding a coil
>>> around a ham sandwich and connecting the lamp. (In the
>>> instructions, say
>>> that it *only* works if aluminum wire is used, and one slice of the
>>> bread
>>> *has* to be pumpernickle.)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> (((((((((((((((((( ( ( ( ( (O) ) ) ) ) )))))))))))))))))))
>>> William J. Beaty SCIENCE HOBBYIST website
>>> billb at amasci com http://amasci.com
>>> EE/programmer/sci-exhibits amateur science, hobby projects, sci fair
>>> Seattle, WA 425-222-5066 unusual phenomena, tesla coils, weird sci
>>>
>>
>> (((((((((((((((((( ( ( ( ( (O) ) ) ) ) )))))))))))))))))))
>> William J. Beaty SCIENCE HOBBYIST website
>> billb at amasci com http://amasci.com
>> EE/programmer/sci-exhibits amateur science, hobby projects, sci fair
>> Seattle, WA 425-222-5066 unusual phenomena, tesla coils, weird sci
>>
>
>
>
>
>

From tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu Mon Mar 5 14:41:42 2007
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