Date: Mon Feb 26 14:41:48 2007

Author: Bill Norwood

Subject: Re: Apparatus Museum

Post:
Many thanks, Tom, for your information, history and photo's. Maybe growing
older is not so bad after all! Bill

-----Original Message-----
From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
Behalf Of Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr.
Sent: Monday, February 26, 2007 1:31 PM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] Apparatus Museum

Dear Bill,

Tap-L does not permit attachments, so I will send pictures of the
Greenslade Natural Philosophy Museum directly to you. As you may know, I
have been working with early apparatus for about thirty five years. Over
that time, my wife and I have visited a lot of physics departments to
take pictures of the early apparatus. In turn, I have given many talks
about early apparatus, the 19th century physics course and early
photography (the tintype photographic process was invented at Kenyon in
1856, and I still make black and white stereoscopic card photographs,)
This work turned into a website with about 1850 pictures of apparatus
from the 1850-1950 era. The easiest way to access this is to google
"Thomas Greenslade" and the link is one of the first things to come up.
I spend considerable time answering questions about apparatus, backed up
by a large collection of early apparatus catalogues and physics texts.
Some of the pictures of the apparatus also appears as page fillers for
/American Journal of Physics/.

In the summer of 2000 another Ohio college needed space, and gave
their older pieces of apparatus to me. Over the next five years I had
contributions of apparatus from about a dozen colleges, schools and
individuals -- about 450 items all told -- so far. The apparatus spread
all over our 1857 house abutting the Kenyon campus -- the living room,
the dining room, the kitchen, my darkroom, the basement, display
cabinets in the back entry and the first and second floors of the garage.

In the summer of 2005 we made an eighth addition to the house -- a
15x20 wing -- to house about 250 of the more visually appealing items.
It has a high ceiling with an oval window at one end, with an 1880-era
refractor looking out the window. The cherry shelving on three sides is
a foot deep and eight feet high, with the top shelf being reserved for
part of my collection of early books. A table in the middle holds more
apparatus; next to it is a cabinet holding 550 glass slides (1914-1920)
with a lantern slide projector atop it.

The museum is open by appointment. If you are in the area, send me an
email, visit and sign the guest book. It is NOT listed in the AAA guide!
And the invitation also goes to all Tap-L folks.

The Kenyon physics department has an exhibit of Leeds & Northrup
electrical measurements apparatus that I set up last year. In 1926 we
bought about $2000 worth of apparatus to outfit a new science building,
and we still have all the apparatus and the paperwork. The exhibit is
based on an article about the apparatus that I published in
"Rittenhouse" a couple of years ago.

A couple of weeks ago an exhibit of early apparatus opened at the
Denison University Museum -- I curated this segment of a larger show
called "The Art of Science" and gave the gallery talk about it.

Best Regards,

Tom

Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr.
Department of Physics
Kenyon College
Gambier, Ohio 43022

Bill Norwood wrote:
> Tom, Got a museum, huh? Is it a relatively department-private one - or
> is it fancied up to be viewable by the public? I can imagine that such
could
> run into a lot of work. We have some old stuff in display cases in the
> student lab hallways, but there is no "energy" for maintenance. Bill
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
> Behalf Of Bill Norwood
> Sent: Monday, February 26, 2007 11:35 AM
> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> Subject: Re: [tap-l] Bernard's Guns
>
> Many thanks, Tom, That was most helpful. Bill
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
> Behalf Of Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr.
> Sent: Monday, February 26, 2007 11:02 AM
> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> Subject: Re: [tap-l] Bernard's Guns
>
> The Beck Ball Pendulum is now made by Daedelon. Some years back Mr.
> Beck sent me the prototype of the very successful weight hanger that he
> made in large numbers -- it is now in my museum.
>
> Tom Greenslade
>
> Bill Norwood wrote:
>
>> Hi Tappers,
>>
>>
>>
>> Ol' Bernard went Ballistic, as some of us know.
>>
>> Anybody know how to reach him or his descendents for help or
>> replacements for our Beck's?
>>
>>
>>
>> By the way, we have signed, typed letters from Bernard Beck from the
>> 1960's and 1980's.
>>
>>
>>
>> Also, I am concerned that we may have worn out our ballistic pendulum
>> guns too fast by using an experimental procedure that might have
>> called for perhaps twice as many firings as might have been necessary
>> otherwise.
>>
>>
>>
>> If you have a lab manual write-up you could share I would be delighted
>> to look at it.
>>
>>
>>
>> Many Thanks,
>>
>>
>>
>> Bill Norwood
>>
>> Technician
>>
>> Elementary Labs
>>
>> Physics, U of MD, College Park
>>
>>
>
>
>
>



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