Date: Fri Feb 23 09:40:03 2007

Author: --- cbettis

Subject: Re: Extension cords and the Fire Marshal

Post:
Yes,

We got the quote from the code and were as puzzled as ever. They apparently
are insisting on an unmodified, UL approved, manufactured product.

I have a Lecture Demonstration show to stage this weekend; it's going to be
fun doing it without heavy extension cords. I am perfectly free to use the,
light weight consumer variety.

An iteresting irony: this morning when I came in, I found one of the wall
mounted outlet strips torn from the wall; apparently the custodial staffs
doing. I had to do a repair before class started.

Cliff

Quoting Richard Heckathorn :

> Greetings again.
>
> Have you asked for and read the code. Don't assume
> that the FM knows how to interpret everything
> correctly.
>
> Many years ago a FM came into our high school
> chemistry lab and asked us if we had any titanium
> in the lab. We had none. Then he asked for out
> chemistry list, found titanium oxide and said it
> had to go. I then asked him if sodium was on the
> list and if it had to go. Answer yes. Then I
> showed him the NaCl container which he grabbed and
> said it had to go.
>
> Finally after a little education he was able to do
> a better job.
>
> Dick
>
>
> Helping teachers who facilitate, motivating
> students who learn.
> Dick Heckathorn 14665 Pawnee Trail Middleburg
> Hts, OH 44130 440-826-0834
> www.cvcaroyals.org/~rheckathorn/
> Adjunct Physics Teacher - Baldwin Wallace College
> Physics is learning how to communicate with ones
> environment so that it will talk back.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
> [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of
> DMathies@tulsacc.edu
> Sent: Thursday, February 22, 2007 5:07 PM
> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> Subject: Re: [tap-l] Extension cords and the Fire
> Marshal
>
> One of the problems is that the fire marshals are
> local and local laws
> differ. What is legal in one place may not be
> legal in another. I have to
> meet a different set of guide lines than the
> public high school located
> less than two miles away because they are city
> owned and we are a state
> school.
>
> I had to get rid of my heavy duty extension cords
> (they sound a lot like
> yours) about ten years ago. The local HS teacher
> did not because he held a
> electricians license from the city. After he
> retired his cords were deemed
> not acceptable.
>
> Don Mathieson
> Tulsa Community College
> dmathies@tulsacc.edu
>
>
>
>
>
> "Cliff Bettis"
>
>
> .unl.edu>
> To
> Sent by:
>
> tap-l-owner@lists
> cc
> .ncsu.edu
>
>
> Subject
> [tap-l]
> Extension cords and the
> 02/22/2007 02:09 Fire
> Marshal
> PM
>
>
>
>
>
> Please respond to
>
> tap-l@lists.ncsu.
>
> edu
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> I wonder if any of you have run into this: I just
> was inspected for safety
> and got written up for my extension cords. I have
> (actually, used to have)
> cords that were made up by my shop. They were made
> of the heaviest duty
> cable and componebts I could reasonably use and
> terminated in four outlet
> metal boxes. The inspector says all extension
> cords shall be UL approved
> with a manufacturers label on them. My problem is
> for classroom use I need
> things that aren't readily available, heavy-duty
> custom lengths (too short
> is a tripping hazzard, and too long means you have
> to coil them up which is
> also against the code; and obviously you don't
> plug one into another) to
> suit the rooms (usually things like projectors,
> laptops and various power
> supplies, some over 1000 W).
>
> So I am waiting for my shop to sort out what's
> commercially available and
> hoping I can find something suitable. They won't
> even let us buy long ones
> and shorten them. I have been using these things
> for several decades and
> this has just come up.
>
> Cliff
>
>
>
>

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