Date: Thu Feb 22 16:37:13 2007

Author: Bill Norwood

Subject: Re: Extension cords and the Fire Marshal

Post:
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Hi Cliff and others,



Not exactly, but we are just now replacing "against code" multiple outlet
boxes

which had been hardwired in to power boxes under an enclosed section running
the length of the labs.

And, as you, there had never been a problem for many years.



I am not actually "running this show" so can't provide a lot of detail.



Another one coming up is, I think, a requirement for ground fault
interrupters in the student labs.

Does anyone have experience in how these play out in the labs?

Are they getting tripped all of the time and requiring a lot of extra
technician attention?



Thanks,



Bill Norwood

Technician

Physics Elementary Labs

U of MD, College Park



_____

From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
Behalf Of Andrew Yue
Sent: Thursday, February 22, 2007 3:25 PM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] Extension cords and the Fire Marshal



Cliff,



Take one each UL approved extension cable and have your electronics shop
wire one each circuit breaker type power strip onto the female end of the
extension cable.



The circuit breaker guarantees that you won't exceed 15 amps for that
extension cord.



This works here at UT Austin for the State Fire Marshall's inspection.



I wonder if any of you have run into this: I just was inspected for safety
and got written up for my extension cords. I have (actually, used to have)
cords that were made up by my shop. They were made of the heaviest duty
cable and componebts I could reasonably use and terminated in four outlet
metal boxes. The inspector says all extension cords shall be UL approved
with a manufacturers label on them. My problem is for classroom use I need
things that aren't readily available, heavy-duty custom lengths (too short
is a tripping hazzard, and too long means you have to coil them up which is
also against the code; and obviously you don't plug one into another) to
suit the rooms (usually things like projectors, laptops and various power
supplies, some over 1000 W).



So I am waiting for my shop to sort out what's commercially available and
hoping I can find something suitable. They won't even let us buy long ones
and shorten them. I have been using these things for several decades and
this has just come up.



Cliff





--



Cordially,




Andrew Yue
- yue@physics.utexas.edu -
http://www.ph.utexas.edu/~yue
Physics Lecture Demonstration Office
Office Hours 8 AM to 4 PM , Mon thru Fri

Phone (512)471-5411


"The ultimate weakness of violence is
that it is a descending spiral, begetting
the very thing it seeks to destroy. Instead

of diminishing evil, it multiplies it. " - Martin Luther King, Jr.


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Hi Cliff and =
others,



Not exactly, but we are just now =
replacing
“against code” multiple outlet boxes =


which had been hardwired in to =
power boxes
under an enclosed section running the length of the =
labs.

And, as you, there had never been a
problem for many years.



I am not actually “running =
this show”
so can’t provide a lot of detail.



Another one coming up is, I think, =
a
requirement for ground fault interrupters in the student =
labs.

Does anyone have experience in how =
these
play out in the labs?

Are they getting tripped all of the =
time
and requiring a lot of extra technician =
attention?



Thanks,=




Bill =
Norwood

Technician<=
/p>

Physics Elementary =
Labs

U of MD, College =
Park











From:
tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of Andrew Yue
Sent: Thursday, February =
22, 2007
3:25 PM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] =
Extension
cords and the Fire Marshal







Cliff,











Take one each UL approved extension cable and have your
electronics shop wire one each circuit breaker type power strip onto the =
female
end of the extension cable.











The circuit breaker guarantees that you won't exceed 15 amps for =
that
extension cord.











This works here at UT Austin for the State Fire Marshall's =
inspection.











I wonder if any of you have run into this: I just was
inspected for safety and got written up for my extension cords. I have
(actually, used to have) cords that were made up by my shop. They were =
made of
the heaviest duty cable and componebts I could reasonably use and =
terminated in
four outlet metal boxes. The inspector says all extension cords shall be =
UL
approved with a manufacturers label on them. My problem is for classroom =
use I
need things that aren't readily available, heavy-duty custom lengths =
(too short
is a tripping hazzard, and too long means you have to coil them up which =
is
also against the code; and obviously you don't plug one into another) to =
suit
the rooms (usually things like projectors, laptops and various power =
supplies,
some over 1000 W).











So I am waiting for my shop to sort out what's =
commercially
available and hoping I can find something suitable. They won't even let =
us buy
long ones and shorten them. I have been using these things for several =
decades
and this has just come up.











Cliff















--









&n=
bsp; &nb=
sp;
Cordially,












&n=
bsp; Andrew Yue
- =
yue@physics.utexas.edu -
http://www.ph.utexas.edu/~yue
Physics Lecture Demonstration Office
Office Hours 8 AM to 4 PM , Mon thru =
Fri






Phone (512)471-5411






"The =
ultimate
weakness of violence is
that it is a descending spiral, begetting
the very thing it seeks to destroy. Instead





of =
diminishing evil,
it multiplies it. " - Martin Luther King, =
Jr.









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