Date: Tue Feb 20 12:57:00 2007

Author: Edward Sabol

Subject: Re: CO2 release from soda

Post:
Try rinsing the ice with water first then add soda.

I go with nucleation sites

----Original Message Follows----
From: "Papp, James J "
Reply-To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
To:
Subject: Re: [tap-l] CO2 release from soda
Date: Tue, 20 Feb 2007 11:49:08 -0600

>Solubility of gasses in liquids usually decreases w/ temperature,
therefore, I don't think that (paragraph 1) is the reason. I'm rather
>certain the ice supplies nucleation points for the concentration of the
CO2 into bubbles; the same reason for the infamous mentos >demo.
Interesting link!

Just out of curiosity, does the presence of nucleation sites change the
steady state (a.k.a. equilibrium) results? That topic is beyond my
education in chemistry.

And... what is PBBA?

Have a nice day all,

Jim Papp


________________________________

From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
Behalf Of Bernard Cleyet
Sent: Tuesday, February 20, 2007 11:33 AM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] CO2 release from soda


Solubility of gasses in liquids usually decreases w/ temperature,
therefore, I don't think that (paragraph 1) is the reason. I'm rather
certain the ice supplies nucleation points for the concentration of the
CO2 into bubbles; the same reason for the infamous mentos demo.

Diluting soda w water (paragraph 2) will reduce bubbling because it
reduces the CO2 concentration, however, if the water is not pure and air
free, it will supply nucleation sites and have the opposite effect.

bc, waiting to see if incorrect. [doesn't believe in PBBA)

p.s. this has been a discussion on another list, perhaps I'll question
it. (paragraph 3)

p.p.s. first response to googling:


http://www.physlink.com/Education/AskExperts/ae441.cfm

constitutes PBATA (os should I write G?)

Papp, James J wrote:


I thought that the solubility of the CO2 gas in water was a
function of
temperature as well as pressure, so that the cooler water-gas
mixture
would expel the gas more quickly. Rather than the walls
weakening, the
gas pressure in the bubbles increases as the rate of gas flux
increases.

I will go ahead and say that I was under the impression that the
flat
soda was the result of melting ice diluting the CO2-water
mixture,
reducing the gas pressure of the CO2 in the new mixture.

If anyone has better information, or has a chemist on hand who
could set
us (ok, me) straight, please do it. I would like to see some
numbers on
this - I remember working problems with partial gas pressure in
chemistry, but I have not the resources on hand to reproduce
them.

Thanks,

Jim Papp

-----Original Message-----
From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
[mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
Behalf Of cablem
Sent: Tuesday, February 20, 2007 10:31 AM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: [tap-l] CO2 release from soda



cut


My guess is the rapid cooling somehow weakens the walls of the
bubbles,
thus allowing them to pop and release the gas. In fact, I'm
willing to
bet that any abrupt change in temp causes the bubbles to do
this. Pour
some soda onto a hot skillet and see what happens. Be safe while
you do
it!

Chele

On 2/20/2007 9:56 AM, Richard Heckathorn wrote:


Greetings,

I have a question that I just can't answer.

Soda pop is of course a gas (CO2) dissolved in a liquid
with the gas
placed in the liquid under pressure. If the pop is
warmed CO2
escapes. Thus less 'bite' to the taste. Shaking the pop
causes
CO2 to escape.

When I pour the pop over ice, if fizzes greatly as
CO2 escapes. In fact, so much so that the soda pop is
left with little


<>CO2 in it and tastes flat.

What causes the rapid fizzing? (CO2 escape) as the soda
pop is poured
over ice. This is true even for soda pop being cooled in
the
refrigerator.

Is there a website that discusses this? So far, I have
found none.

Thanks for help.

Dick


v. much cut

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