Date: Tue Feb 20 08:54:34 2007

Author: Richard Heckathorn

Subject: Re: To start your weekend with a laugh ...

Post:
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Greetings,

=20

I still have my KE and Picket slide rules. But my
favorite is a circular slide rule that I still
keep in my lab coat. When the batteries go bad or
when the student forgot their calculator, I offer
them the slide rule. I=92ve even been surprised when
some students wanted to learn about. I then bring
out my 4 foot demo and have at it.

=20

Some of you may remember, in the middle 60=92s that
Picket offered a 4 foot slide rule with every
calculator purchase. (for teachers). About 20 of
my honors students had a teacher buy one for them
with the 4 footers given to the school.

=20

The following is a story of a former student of
mine Kip Nygren who is now teaching at West Point=20

=20

=93For many years, I have been telling anyone who
will listen that you are the reason for my success
as a student at West Point and any other successes
that have resulted from my initial achievements as
a college student. My story follows.

=20

You may recall that you offered to
coordinate the purchase and use of very high
quality slide rules for your Physics class when I
was a senior, and the key to my success was the
fact that you had taught me how to use a
sophisticated slide rule when I started taking
Math at West Point. =20

=20

My first year, all cadets were divided
up into 25 section rooms and we were assigned to
the sections according to our grades in the
course. For the first two weeks of Math we were
sectioned alphabetically (I was in section 18) and
after two weeks we were re-sectioned based on our
grades at that point. (We took Math for 80 min,
six days a week and were graded every day.)
Fortunately, the first two weeks consisted solely
of learning to use the slide rule and I excelled!
With the first re-sectioning I went to the top
section.

=20

If you were in the top section, you
were considered to be a smart cadet and got the
benefit of the doubt in grading. Therefore, it
was relatively easy to stay in the first section,
which I did for the next two years. Of course,
all our science and engineering courses were
initially sectioned based upon our grades in Math,
so I started in the first section in all those
classes.

=20

I shudder to think where I would be
today without the extensive knowledge I had of the
slide rule thanks to your initiative and
expectation that we could understand and use the
highest quality slide rule.=94

=20

Dick

=20

=20

=20

=20

=20

Helping teachers who facilitate, motivating
students who learn.

Dick Heckathorn 14665 Pawnee Trail Middleburg
Hts, OH 44130 440-826-0834

www.cvcaroyals.org/~rheckathorn/

Adjunct Physics Teacher - Baldwin Wallace College

Physics is learning how to communicate with ones
environment so that it will talk back.

=20

-----Original Message-----
From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
[mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of
John Hubisz
Sent: Monday, February 19, 2007 5:13 PM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] To start your weekend with a
laugh ...

=20

I have a box filled with "calculators" (slide
rules) that do a lot more than +, -, x, =F7, & take
sqrt's.

Years ago I sent a box of them to India. Know any
other group that could use some?

John Hubisz, U. of St. Thomas '76

Cudnik,Brian wrote:=20

We have in our Museum a genuine electronic
calculator...all 30 pounds
worth! It can add, subtract, multiply, and divide,
and best of all...it
even takes the square root!
=20
A couple years ago, I began teaching introductory
astronomy courses at a
local Catholic university (the University of St.
Thomas of Houston,
Texas). Each of their two intro astronomy courses
(solar system and
stellar galactic) has a lecture and laboratory
component. I was teaching
the lab component with several students who did
not bring calculators to
assist in the mathematical part of the lab when I
remembered a box
labeled "calculators" in their store room. I went
to fetch the box and
bring it out to the students and found it was full
of slide rules and a
few abaci (more than one abacus)! One electronic
calculator circa 1978
was among the collection but it did not work...
=20
-----Original Message-----
From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
[mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
Behalf Of Cliff Bettis
Sent: Saturday, February 17, 2007 12:04 PM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] To start your weekend with a
laugh ...
=20
Tom,
=20
I think what I found is a later version: it
doesn't show any sign of
glass=20
having been used as the recording medium and the
rails are closer
together.=20
The tuning fork ("C" 128 Hz) is driven by an
electromagnet.
=20
Cliff
=20
----- Original Message -----=20
From: "Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr."


To:
;


Sent: Friday, February 16, 2007 9:32 PM
Subject: Re: [tap-l] To start your weekend with a
laugh ...
=20
=20
=20

To see an example of the free fall apparatus
that Cliff mentions, go
=20

to
=20

=20
=20

http://physics.kenyon.edu/EarlyApparatus/Mechanics
/Free_Fall/Free_Fall.h
tml .
=20

This dates from the 1920s -- not very old at
all...
=20
Cliff -- you break my heart when you disassemble
this piece of=20
apparatus!
=20
Best Regards,
=20
Tom Greenslade
=20
cbettis@unlserve.unl.edu wrote:
=20

Stephen,
=20
I have been doing serious scavenging in the attic.
There is some=20
wonderful old stuff up there. I am grabbing on to
whatever looks good
=20

and=20
=20

isn't museum stuff. I just finished building a
"new" pile driver,
=20

parts=20
=20

of which came from two Young's modulus apparatus
and an old free fall
=20

=20
=20

experiment (really old: it used a tuning fork and
a stylus to leave=20
timing marks on a wax paper streamer).
=20
My guess is most of the stuff will be tossed.
=20
Cliff
=20
Quoting "Wallin, Stephen R"

:
=20
=20
=20

Don't lose those dandy historical artifacts in the
attic. Was UNL
first
physics graduate school west of the Missip.?
Stephen
=20
=20
________________________________
=20
From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
[mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu]
On
Behalf Of Cliff Bettis
Sent: Friday, February 16, 2007 1:58 PM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: [tap-l] To start your weekend with a
laugh ...
=20
=20
I just got this note:
=20
=20
Dear faculty,
=20
The Society of Physics Student has been put in
charge of taking
inventory for the physics department. The
information gathered will
=20

be
=20

used to help prepare moving into the new building.
In the next
=20

couple
=20

of
weeks members of SPS will be contacting each one
of you individually
to
sit down and catalog your specific equipment. This
process should
=20

take
=20

no more than an hour of your time, and it would be
nice if this
=20

could
=20

all be done in a timely manner. Thank you for your
cooperation.
=20
=20
=20
=20

=20
=20

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Greetings,



I still have my KE and Picket slide =
rules.
But my favorite is a circular slide rule that I still keep in my lab =
coat. When
the batteries go bad or when the student forgot their calculator, I =
offer them
the slide rule. Ive even been surprised when some =
students wanted to learn =
about. I
then bring out my 4 foot demo and have at it.



Some of you may remember, in the =
middle 60s
that Picket offered a 4 foot slide rule with every calculator purchase. =
(for
teachers). About 20 of my honors students had a teacher buy one for them =
with
the 4 footers given to the school.



The following is a story of a =
former
student of mine Kip Nygren who is now teaching at West Point =




For many years, I have =
been
telling anyone who will listen that you are the reason for my success as =
a
student at West =
Point and any other successes that have resulted from my =
initial
achievements as a college student. My story =
follows.



=

You may recall that you offered to coordinate the purchase and use of =
very high
quality slide rules for your Physics class when I was =
a senior,
and the key to my success =
was the fact that you had taught me how to use a =
sophisticated
slide rule when I started taking Math at West Point. =




=

My first year, all cadets =
were divided up into 25 section rooms and we were =
assigned to
the sections according to our grades in the course. For the first =
two
weeks of Math we were sectioned alphabetically (I was in section 18) and =
after
two weeks =
we were re-sectioned based on our grades at that point.
(We took Math for 80 min, six days a week and were graded every =
day.)
Fortunately, the first two weeks consisted solely of learning to =
use the
slide rule and I excelled! With the first re-sectioning I went to =
the top
section.



=

If you were in the top section, you were considered to be a smart cadet =
and got
the benefit of the doubt in grading. Therefore, it was relatively =
easy to
stay in the first section, which I did for the next two years. Of =
course,
all our science and engineering courses
were initially sectioned based =
upon
our grades in Math, so I started in the first section in all those =
classes.



=

I shudder to think where I would be today without the extensive =
knowledge I had
of the slide rule thanks to your initiative and expectation that we =
could
understand and use the highest quality slide =
rule.



Dick













Helping teachers =
who
facilitate, motivating students =
who
learn.

Dick
Heckathorn=A0 14665 Pawnee Trail=A0 Middleburg Hts, OH=A0 44130=A0 =
440-826-0834

www.cvcaroyals.org/~rheckathorn/

Adjunct
Physics Teacher - Baldwin Wallace College

Physics
is learning how to communicate with ones environment so that it will =
talk back.





-----Origi=
nal
Message-----
From: =
tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
[mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf
Of John Hubisz
Sent: Monday, February =
19, 2007
5:13 PM
To: =
tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] To =
start your
weekend with a laugh ...



I have a box =
filled with
"calculators" (slide rules) that do a lot more than +, -, x, =
=F7, &
take sqrt's.

Years ago I sent a box of them to India. Know any other group that =
could
use some?

John Hubisz, U. of St. Thomas '76

Cudnik,Brian wrote:

We have in our =
Museum a genuine electronic calculator...all 30 =
poundsworth! It can add, subtract, multiply, and =
divide, and best of all...iteven takes the square =
root! A couple years ago, I began teaching =
introductory astronomy courses at alocal Catholic university (the University of =
St. Thomas of Houston,Texas). Each of their two intro astronomy =
courses (solar system andstellar galactic) has a lecture and =
laboratory component. I was teachingthe lab component with several students who =
did not bring calculators toassist in the mathematical part of the lab =
when I remembered a boxlabeled "calculators" in their =
store room. I went to fetch the box andbring it out to the students and found it was =
full of slide rules and afew abaci (more than one abacus)! One =
electronic calculator circa 1978was among the collection but it did not =
work... -----Original =
Message-----From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu=
[mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.=
edu] OnBehalf Of Cliff =
BettisSent: Saturday, February 17, 2007 12:04 =
PMTo: tap-l@lists.ncsu.eduSubject: Re: [tap-l] To start your weekend =
with a laugh ... Tom, I think what I found is a later version: it =
doesn't show any sign ofglass having been used as the recording medium and =
the rails are closertogether. The tuning fork ("C" 128 Hz) is =
driven by an electromagnet. Cliff ----- Original Message ----- =
From: "Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr." =
To: ; =
Sent: Friday, February 16, 2007 9:32 =
PMSubject: Re: [tap-l] To start your weekend =
with a laugh ... =A0

=A0 To see an example of the free fall =
apparatus that Cliff mentions, go=A0=A0=A0

to=A0

=A0=A0=A0

http://physics.kenyon.edu/EarlyApparatus/Mechanics/Free_Fall/Fre=
e_Fall.html .=A0

=A0 This dates from the 1920s -- not very old =
at all... =A0 Cliff -- you break my heart when you =
disassemble this piece of apparatus! =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 Best =
Regards, =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=
=A0=A0 Tom Greenslade cbettis@unlserve.unl.edu =
wrote:=A0=A0=A0

Stephen, I have been doing serious scavenging in the =
attic. There is some wonderful old stuff up there. I am grabbing =
on to whatever looks good=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 =




and =
=A0=A0



isn't museum stuff. I just finished building =
a "new" pile driver,=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 =




parts =
=A0=A0



of which came from two Young's modulus =
apparatus and an old free fall=A0 =
=A0=A0=A0=A0



=A0



experiment (really old: it used a tuning fork =
and a stylus to leave timing marks on a wax paper =
streamer). My guess is most of the stuff will be =
tossed. Cliff Quoting "Wallin, Stephen R" lostate-pueblo.edu>: =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0

Don't lose those dandy historical artifacts =
in the attic. Was UNLfirstphysics graduate school west of the =
Missip.?Stephen ________________________________=
From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu=
[mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.=
edu]OnBehalf Of Cliff =
BettisSent: Friday, February 16, 2007 1:58 =
PMTo: tap-l@lists.ncsu.eduSubject: [tap-l] To start your weekend with a =
laugh ... I just got this note: Dear faculty, The Society of Physics Student has been put =
in charge of takinginventory for the physics department. The =
information gathered will=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 =






be=A0





used to help prepare moving into the new =
building. In the next=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 =






couple=A0





ofweeks members of SPS will be contacting each =
one of you individuallytosit down and catalog your specific equipment. =
This process should=A0=A0 =
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0





take=A0





no more than an hour of your time, and it =
would be nice if this=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 =






could=A0





all be done in a timely manner. Thank you for =
your cooperation. =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 =






=A0





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