Date: Wed Feb 7 13:13:10 2007

Author: devore

Subject: Re: NOT

Post:
Here is some evidence of average cooling in a few places in continental
U.S.:

The USDA keeps detailed maps called climate zone maps based on weather
data
from stations all over the country. According to these detailed maps,
I have been living
in zone 7b, and to the north of me is zone 6. (Higher numbers
correspond
to higher average lows. Gardeners know all plants you buy are assigned
the corresponding number
which tells you if they are winter-hardy in your zone.)

The climate zone maps have been recently updated after the last 15
years of data. The National Arbor Day
Foundation has nice maps showing the changes in climate zones. More
than half the country has moved up
one number. Interestingly, though , some places in the desert southwest
have moved DOWN one number, or have gotten colder on average during
the last 15 years.
I realize that is a very short time frame to make broad conclusions.

Most of my old time gardening friends are getting more adventurous as
our winters have been overall milder,
and are successfully over-wintering Florida plants they would not have
dared plant 15 years ago.

Todd DeVore

On Feb 7, 2007, at 11:24 AM, Sam Sampere wrote:

> Here's a question that I don't know the answer to. We've all heard of
> the arctic ice disappearing, same for the Antarctic. The temp data in
> Alaska is quite alarming and clearly shows a temperature increase.
>
> Are there any places on this planet that clearly show an average
> cooling
> or zero change?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Sam
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
> Behalf Of John Hubisz
> Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 9:43 AM
> To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
> Subject: [tap-l] NOT
>
> I left out an important NOT.
>
> "Global" anything means citing evidence world-wide and NOT selecting
> areas of the world that support a particular viewpoint.
>
> John Hubisz



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