Date: Wed Nov 22 11:51:04 2006

Author: Wallin, Stephen R

Subject: Re: IFO 3000

Post:
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We used one at a demo show last week. Put a telecoil (small induction
coil) with amplifier and that little hummer can put out a warble.
Students like the idea that they can detect those unseen happenings with
the magnetic fields.=20

~Stephen

=20

________________________________

From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
Behalf Of Richard Heckathorn
Sent: Wednesday, November 22, 2006 9:29 AM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] IFO 3000

=20

Greetings,

=20

Found using google and inputting 'levitating globe'

=20

These electromagnetic suspended globes are actually high-tech
instruments. A magnetic field sensor permanently measures the height at
which the globes are suspended. This sensor feeds that data into a micro
computer in the base of the unit. This computer than calibrates the
electronic magnets at the top of the frame based on the distance between
the globes and the top magnet to keep the globes correctly positioned.
All in the blink of an eye! So not only do these look great on your
desktop levitating in thin air, they are also technology marvels!=20

=20

How I think it works !!!

The 9 inch world globe contains a large magnet inside the top and a
small magnet inside the bottom. The top of the stand contains a large
iron core electromagnet. The bottom of the stand contains a Hall effect
magnetic field strength sensor. This senses the position of the globe by
sensing the field strength from the small magnet in the bottom of the
globe. The sensor provides input to the feedback circuit which controls
the current provided to the electromagnet in the top of the stand. This
feedback control circuit holds the globe in mid air. It provides rock
stable levitation.

The base of the stand is a large heat sink with some power transistors
and parts I could not see without breaking the welded plastic. I could
not see the Hall effect sensor. I will not break my $170. toy to try to
see it! If you are a smart electrical engineer, you may be able to build
this wonderful stable levitation system. It is no longer sold as far as
I can tell. When you place the globe in the stand (in mid air), there is
a solid notch it stays in. If you pull down on the globe, you can hear
the circuit transformer hum as it sends more current to the top
electromagnet to pull the globe up. This is a very good, very stable
feedback control circuit. I have left it on for at least 8 hours at a
time. The base gets warm. If you give the globe a good spin, it will
spin for about 20 minutes before it slows down from air friction and the
friction of the magnetic field itself. When you unplug the stand, the
globe drops. The large magnet in the top of the globe will hold the
globe hanging from the stand top when the power is off.

This thing is really neat !!!
http://www.geocities.com/dsligar.geo/globe.html=20

=20

Go here: interesting http://www.oz.net/~coilgun/lev_visual/home.htm=20

=20

Now I must get back to work.

=20

Dick

=20

=20

Helping teachers who facilitate, motivating students who learn.

Dick Heckathorn 14665 Pawnee Trail Middleburg Hts, OH 44130
440-826-0834

www.cvcaroyals.org/~rheckathorn/

Adjunct Physics Teacher - Baldwin Wallace College

Physics is learning how to communicate with ones environment so that it
will talk back.

=20

-----Original Message-----
From: tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On
Behalf Of Gerald Zani
Sent: Wednesday, November 22, 2006 10:44 AM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] IFO 3000

=20

I dunno, but perhaps it has a spinning Levitron inside the globe, with
the perpetuator hidden in the base?

That device was on display in the resource room a few years ago. I
think at Sacramento?

I assumed it is some clever, careful arrangement of rotating magnetic
poles. -- JZ

At 09:43 AM 11/22/2006, you wrote:

Does anyone know how this gadget works?
=20
http://scientificsonline.com/product.asp?pn=3D3036982&bhcd2=3D1164206070
=20
I measure pulses of alternating polarity coming from the head with a
period of 10 ms. What I don't know is what sort of detector it uses. I
suspect it must be either magnetic or rf as one can insert an opaque
object between the globe and head without disturbing the levitation.
=20
It is an extremely cool attention getter.
=20
Cliff


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We used one at a demo show last =
week. Put
a telecoil (small induction coil) with amplifier and that little hummer =
can put
out a warble. Students like the idea that they can detect those unseen
happenings with the magnetic fields.

~Stephen











From:
tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu [mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf Of Richard =
Heckathorn
Sent: Wednesday, November =
22, 2006
9:29 AM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] IFO =
3000





Greetings,<=
/p>



Found using google and inputting
‘levitating globe’



These
electromagnetic suspended globes are actually high-tech instruments. A =
magnetic
field sensor permanently measures the height at which the globes are =
suspended.
This sensor feeds that data into a micro computer in the base of the =
unit. This
computer than calibrates the electronic magnets at the top of the frame =
based
on the distance between the globes and the top magnet to keep the globes
correctly positioned. All in the blink of an eye! So not only do these =
look
great on your desktop levitating in thin air, they are also technology =
marvels!




How
I think it works !!!

The 9
inch world globe contains a large magnet inside the top and a small =
magnet
inside the bottom. The top of the stand contains a large iron core
electromagnet. The bottom of the stand contains a Hall effect magnetic =
field
strength sensor. This senses the position of the globe by sensing the =
field
strength from the small magnet in the bottom of the globe. The sensor =
provides
input to the feedback circuit which controls the current provided to the
electromagnet in the top of the stand. This feedback control circuit =
holds the
globe in mid air. It provides rock stable =
levitation.

The base
of the stand is a large heat sink with some power transistors and parts =
I could
not see without breaking the welded plastic. I could not see the Hall =
effect
sensor. I will not break my $170. toy to try to see it! If you are a =
smart
electrical engineer, you may be able to build this wonderful stable =
levitation
system. It is no longer sold as far as I can tell. When you place the =
globe in
the stand (in mid air), there is a solid notch it stays in. If you pull =
down on
the globe, you can hear the circuit transformer hum as it sends more =
current to
the top electromagnet to pull the globe up. This is a very good, very =
stable
feedback control circuit. I have left it on for at least 8 hours at a =
time. The
base gets warm. If you give the globe a good spin, it will spin for =
about 20
minutes before it slows down from air friction and the friction of the =
magnetic
field itself. When you unplug the stand, the globe drops. The large =
magnet in
the top of the globe will hold the globe hanging from the stand top when =
the
power is off.

This
thing is really neat !!! http://www.geoci=
ties.com/dsligar.geo/globe.html




Go here:
interesting http://www.oz.net=
/~coilgun/lev_visual/home.htm




Now I
must get back to work.



Dick







Helping teachers who facilitate, motivating students =
who
learn.

Dick
Heckathorn 14665 Pawnee Trail Middleburg Hts, OH =
44130 =
440-826-0834

www.cvcaroyals.org/~rheckathorn/

Adjunct
Physics Teacher - Baldwin
Wallace College<=
/p>

Physics
is learning how to communicate with ones environment so that it will =
talk back.





-----Original =
Message-----
From: =
tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu
[mailto:tap-l-owner@lists.ncsu.edu] On Behalf
Of Gerald Zani
Sent: Wednesday, November =
22, 2006
10:44 AM
To: tap-l@lists.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: [tap-l] IFO =
3000



I dunno, but perhaps it has a spinning =
Levitron inside
the globe, with the perpetuator hidden in the base?

That device was on display in the resource room a few years ago. I =
think
at Sacramento?

I assumed it is some clever, careful arrangement of rotating magnetic
poles. -- JZ

At 09:43 AM 11/22/2006, you wrote:

Does anyone know how this =
gadget
works?

http://scientificsonline.com/product.asp?pn=3D3036982&bhc=
d2=3D1164206070

I
measure pulses of alternating polarity coming from the head with a =
period of 10
ms. What I don't know is what sort of detector it uses. I suspect it =
must be
either magnetic or rf as one can insert an opaque object between the =
globe and
head without disturbing the levitation.

It is
an extremely cool attention getter.

Cliff







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