Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2005 17:15:20 -0400

Author: "John L. Hubisz"

Subject: Re: telescope

Post:

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If you didn't buy my argument for the binoculars, the AstroScan suggestion
would follow.

John

At 03:27 PM 8/30/2005, Steve Anderson wrote:
>If it is for home viewing by school age children (and for your money) I
>think the Edmund Scientific AstroScan is the "cat's pajamas" (that is
>old-timer slang meaning sweet or dope).
>
>The kids can do it (pointing) themselves, which is part of the fun. It is
>cheaper than I have paid just for some eyepieces. No computer to lug along
>and confuse the star-finder. My observation with GoTo mounts is, students
>don't learn the constellations. It can also be used terrestrially, which
>is a big plus. It is great for the moon, ok for planets with a higher
>power eyepiece and will mount a camera.
>
>Another popular unit for star gazing is the Chicago Optical 6" RFT or
>Wide-field Newtonian. With right eyepiece, one can see planets in color
>with lots of eye relief. This one does require a tripod or pier, but is
>small enough to be mounted by a 6th grader.
>
>CHICAGO OPTICAL & SUPPLY
> 2812 W. Touhy Ave.
> Chicago, Illinois 60645
>Phone: 773-761-8969
>Fax: 773-761-3601
>
>s.anderson
>CSU Sonoma

John L. Hubisz, Physics Department, Box 8202, North Carolina State
University, Raleigh NC 27695-8202; hubisz@unity.ncsu.edu, (919)362-5782,
(919)515-7331 FAX

http://www.science-house.org/middleschool/
http://www.physics.ncsu.edu/ncsaapt/ or
http://www2.ncsu.edu/ncsu/pams/physics/ncsaapt
http://www.physics.ncsu.edu/faculty/hubisz.html


HOME: 1604 South Salem Street, Apex NC 27502-7251, hubisz@mindspring.com,
(919)362-5782 (Voice & FAX)
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If you didn't buy my argument for the binoculars, the AstroScan
suggestion would follow.


John


At 03:27 PM 8/30/2005, Steve Anderson wrote:

If it is for home viewing by
school age children (and for your money) I think the Edmund
Scientific AstroScan is the "cat's pajamas" (that is old-timer
slang meaning sweet or dope).


The kids can do it (pointing) themselves, which is part of the fun. It is
cheaper than I have paid just for some eyepieces. No computer to lug
along and confuse the star-finder. My observation with GoTo mounts is,
students don't learn the constellations. It can also be used
terrestrially, which is a big plus. It is great for the moon, ok for
planets with a higher power eyepiece and will mount a camera.


Another popular unit for star gazing is the Chicago Optical 6" RFT
or Wide-field Newtonian. With right eyepiece, one can see planets in
color with lots of eye relief. This one does require a tripod or pier,
but is small enough to be mounted by a 6th grader.


CHICAGO OPTICAL & SUPPLY

 2812 W. Touhy Ave.

   Chicago,  Illinois  60645

Phone:    773-761-8969

Fax:    773-761-3601



s.anderson

CSU Sonoma


John L. Hubisz, Physics Department, Box 8202, North Carolina State
University, Raleigh  NC  27695-8202; hubisz@unity.ncsu.edu,
(919)362-5782, (919)515-7331 FAX



http://www.science-house.org/middleschool/


http://www.physics.ncsu.edu/ncsaapt/
or

http://www2.ncsu.edu/ncsu/pams/physics/ncsaapt



http://www.physics.ncsu.edu/faculty/hubisz.html



HOME: 1604 South Salem Street, Apex  NC  27502-7251,
hubisz@mindspring.com, (919)362-5782 (Voice & FAX)


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From hubisz@mindspring.com Tue Aug 30 17:37:36 2005

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