Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2005 09:58:37 -0500

Author: Wolfgang Rueckner

Subject: Re: Burning light bulb.

Post:

Just want to thank all you tap-l people for this one. I've been doing
the conductivity of glass for years, and always with hit-or-miss
results because (in my version) I wrapped wire around the two ends of a
glass rod. Heating the glass rod invariably blackened and oxidized the
wire enough so that I was never able to secure a reliable electrical
connection. But using a broken light bulb works brilliantly! (pun
intended)
-- thank you -- Wolfgang


On Feb 28, 2005, at 6:44 PM, Jason St. John wrote:

> This one's a hoot, Chairman Kardelis. I use a self-igniting propane
> torch
> applied to the glass.
>
> For those who don't know about this beauty, ala Zig Peacock, do this:
> place a lightbulb in a plastic bag and lightly smash it with a hammer.
> Retrieve the screwbase and with pliers and wirecutters, trim off any
> shards of the bulb which remain attached, as well as the exposed metal
> filaments. Plug it in, ideally in series with another bulb, and plug
> the
> whole mess into the wall. Then do as above, heating the glass of the
> exposed lightbulb innards until it glows orange hot, at which point the
> other bulb will light, and the flame may be removed because resistive
> heating will keep it hot enough for the glass to conduct electric
> current.
>
> Gets 'em every time.
> -jmsj
>
>
>
> On 2005-02-28.16:09 owner-tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu sent:
>
>
>
> I saw a demo a while back where you get the glass between the two leads
> on light bulb filament to melt and start to burn. I can't find my
> notes
> on how to get the burning started. Thanks in advance dave
>
>
>
>
>
> David Kardelis Ph.D.
>
> Chairman; Dept of Chemistry and Physics
>
> College of Eastern Utah
>
> 451 E 400 N
>
> Price, UT 84501
>
>
>
> david.kardelis@ceu.edu
>
> 435-613-5258
>
> 435-613-5125 (lab phone)
>
> 435-613-5996 Fax
>
>
>
From sampere@physics.syr.edu Tue Mar 1 10:08:51 2005

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