Date: Fri, 3 Dec 2004 09:26:29 -0600

Author: Paul Nord

Subject: Re: buoyancy

Post:


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On Friday, December 3, 2004, at 09:07 AM, A Gavrin wrote:

> I would look at it another way. Forget about "bouyancy"; instead,
> think of hydrostatic pressure. Bouyancy is just a fancy name for the
> net upwards force. At any given depth, this is due to the pressure,
> given by rho*g*h, so changes in g (due to acceleration, trips to other
> planets, etc.) change the pressure, and thus the force. This change is
> equal to, and opposite from, the changes in the weight of the floater.

Yes... but only until the floater gets crushed!

Imagine a ping-pong ball in a centrifuge. Hold it underwater with a
sinker if you like. Eventually the pressure of the water will be great
enough to make it implode.

Paul

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On Friday, December 3, 2004, at 09:07 AM, A Gavrin wrote:


I would look at it another way. Forget about
"bouyancy"; instead, think of hydrostatic pressure. Bouyancy is just a
fancy name for the net upwards force. At any given depth, this is due
to the pressure, given by rho*g*h, so changes in g (due to
acceleration, trips to other planets, etc.) change the pressure, and
thus the force. This change is equal to, and opposite from, the
changes in the weight of the floater.



Yes... but only until the floater gets crushed!


Imagine a ping-pong ball in a centrifuge. Hold it underwater with a
sinker if you like. Eventually the pressure of the water will be
great enough to make it implode.


Paul


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From fizzix@netmcr.com Fri Dec 3 10:47:04 2004

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