Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 19:31:35 -0500

Author: Patricia Sievert

Subject: Re: Questions for all on the list

Post:


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As an "informal educator" who didn't have time to respond in a timely
manner, I'd appreciate your making the results generally available.

I just finished putting away about 50 interactive demos from our 2nd
annual Haunted Physics Lab. We had about 700 people come through in 4
hours this afternoon. (250 in 3 hours last year.) Thank goodness for
good volunteers, but I did not see one single faculty member there
today. Made good use of the Bauder grant....

Now I've got to get enough energy to get from may desk to the van to get
home! At least I have the time change to help get caught up on sleep.

Happy Halloween everyone!
Pati


Stenquist1@aol.com wrote:

> Thanks to all of the respondents.
>
> The number is quite higfh so rather than give individual thanks at
> this moment (that will follow later, I will make it a blanket thank
> you for now.
>
> Upon seeing the responses I realize that many of the questions were
> posed either too broadly or incorrectly. I will analyze the data
> within a couple of weeks (I'm off to present a paper at an informal
> science education conference in Spain) and hopefully have questions
> that are a bit more specific and useful to all of us.
> It's interesting how my preconceptions were not necessarily confirmed
> by the answers.
> Should I make the analysis available to all or would the respondents
> rather I send it out individually?
>
> Thanks again for the help
>
> BOB FRIEDHOFFER
> City University of New York
> Center for Advanced Study in Education
> 365 5TH AVENUE
> #3300
> NYC, NY 10021
>
> www.scienctrix.com
>
>
>
> In a message dated 10/29/2004 4:29:44 PM Eastern Standard Time,
> DWARN@boisestate.edu writes:
>
> Bob,
>
> Your responses have shaken loose lots of old cob webs from the
> last century. To put things in perspective I grew up on a not
> very prosperous dairy farm and I started this gig in 1944, long
> before we were able to afford TV. I went to a 2 room grade school
> for the first 8 years that was one mile away and up hill both
> ways. Most of the toys I played with were my older brothers. He
> got lots of stuff because he was the first on the scene. Also
> when I touched down, WWII was in full swing and cool stuff was
> hard to find. I still have most of the junk, and part if it is
> office decorations.
>
> We had:
> 2 chemistry sets but spent most of the time trying to make gun
> powder to go bang or make rockets. (Pre Esties)
> 1 Erector set
> 1 crappy microscope
> Lincoln logs and tinker toys
> lots of modeling clay to make cars and stuff out of.
> Made several electric motors
> Made several crystal radios and later transistorized them.
> 1960 got my Ham licence, which I still have, and was into making
> Home Bru Ham gear.
>
> We went to the museum at the U. of Washington in Seattle. They
> had some cool mummies.
>
> Early radio shows were Sky King that had an opening montage of a
> plane fling over. I wondered why he throttled back when he flew over.
>
> I learned how to read with Boys Life, Popular Mechanics, Popular
> Science, and Mechanics Illustrated.
>
> The TV programs that I was impressed with were the GE specials
> like Our Mr. Sun, Hemo the Magnificent .....
>
> One move that I thought was cool was Ear My Dust with Red Skelton
> where he made a car out of odds and ends of junk.
>
> When I was in 6th grade, we had a week long session of Sermons in
> Science by the Moody Institute of Science (Moody Bible Institute)
> where the guy did hundreds of demos. He had an Oden coil that he
> stood on and fried a stick in his hand. He gave me the stick with
> all of the scorch marks. The point he was trying to get across
> was being "in tune with God" so he didn't mention the skin
> effect. He wasn't able to save my soul, but he sure peaked my
> interest in science.
>
> Another influential person was Virgil Vail of Northwest Nazerine
> College. He could make ANYTHING! He gave me the ham licence
> test. Another one was my Chemistry Teacher. By that time I was
> well on my way to my present destruction.
>
> I wonder how important these influences are in determining our
> passions. My brother had a head start and lots of advantages that
> I didn't have and he went off in a completely different
> direction. I still don't know what I want to be when I grow up!
>
> Thanks for getting me to think about things I did 50 years ago.
>
> Duane Warn
> Boise State U.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


--
Patricia Sievert
Physics Outreach Coordinator
219 Faraday Hall
Physics Department
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, IL 60115
sievert@physics.niu.edu
(815) 753-6418



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As an "informal educator" who didn't have time to respond in a timely manner,
I'd appreciate your making the results generally available.  



I just finished putting away about 50 interactive demos from our 2nd annual
Haunted Physics Lab.  We had about 700 people come through in 4 hours this
afternoon.  (250 in 3 hours last year.)  Thank goodness for good volunteers,
but I did not see one single faculty member there today.  Made good use of
the Bauder grant....



Now I've got to get enough energy to get from may desk to the van to get
home!  At least I have the time change to help get caught up on sleep.



Happy Halloween everyone!

Pati





Stenquist1@aol.com wrote:


content="text/html; ">




Thanks to all of the respondents.


 


The number is quite higfh so rather than give individual thanks at
this moment (that will follow later, I will make it a blanket thank you for
now.


 


Upon seeing the responses I realize that many of the questions were
posed either too broadly or incorrectly.  I will analyze the data within
a couple of weeks (I'm off to present a paper at an informal science education
conference in Spain) and hopefully have questions that are a bit more specific
and useful to all of us.


It's interesting how my preconceptions were not necessarily confirmed
by the answers. 


Should I make the analysis available to all or would the respondents
rather I send it out individually?


 


Thanks again for the help


 



ptsize="10">BOB FRIEDHOFFER

City University of New York

Center for Advanced Study in Education

365 5TH AVENUE

#3300

NYC, NY 10021



www.scienctrix.com



 


 


 


In a message dated 10/29/2004 4:29:44 PM Eastern Standard Time, DWARN@boisestate.edu
writes:


style="border-left: 2px solid blue; padding-left: 5px; margin-left: 5px;">
Bob,


 


Your responses have shaken loose lots
of old cob webs from the last century.  To put things in perspective I grew
up on a not very prosperous dairy farm and I started this gig in 1944, long
before we were able to afford TV.  I went to a 2 room grade school for the
first 8 years that was one mile away and up hill both ways.  Most of the
toys I played with were my older brothers.  He got lots of stuff because
he was the first on the scene.  Also when I touched down, WWII was in full
swing and cool stuff was hard to find.  I still have most of the junk, and
part if it is office decorations.


 


We had:


2 chemistry sets but spent most of
the time trying to make gun powder to go bang or make rockets.  (Pre Esties)


1 Erector set


1 crappy microscope


Lincoln logs and tinker toys


lots of modeling clay to make cars
and stuff out of.


Made several electric motors


Made several crystal radios and later
transistorized them.


1960 got my Ham licence, which I still
have, and was into making Home Bru Ham gear.


 


We went to the museum at the U. of
Washington in Seattle.  They had some cool mummies.


 


Early radio shows were Sky King that
had an opening montage of a plane fling over.  I wondered why he throttled
back when he flew over.


 


I learned how to read with Boys Life,
Popular Mechanics, Popular Science, and Mechanics Illustrated.


 


The TV programs that I was impressed
with were the GE specials like Our Mr. Sun, Hemo the Magnificent .....


 


One move that I thought was cool was
Ear My Dust  with Red Skelton where he made a car out of odds and ends of
junk.


 


When I was in 6th grade, we had a week
long session of Sermons in Science by the Moody Institute of Science (Moody
Bible Institute)  where the guy did hundreds of demos.  He had an Oden coil
that he stood on and fried a stick in his hand.  He gave me the stick with
all of the scorch marks.  The point he was trying to get across was being
"in tune with God" so he didn't mention the skin effect.  He wasn't able
to save my soul, but he sure peaked my interest in science.


 


Another influential person was Virgil
Vail of Northwest Nazerine College.  He could make ANYTHING!  He gave me
the ham licence test.  Another one was my Chemistry Teacher.  By that time
I was well on my way to my present destruction.


 


I wonder how important these influences
are in determining our passions.  My brother had a head start and lots of
advantages that I didn't have and he went off in a completely different direction. 
I still don't know what I want to be when I grow up!


 


Thanks for getting me to think about
things I did 50 years ago.


 


Duane Warn


Boise State U.


 


 


 




 


 


 




-- 
Patricia Sievert
Physics Outreach Coordinator
219 Faraday Hall
Physics Department
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, IL 60115
sievert@physics.niu.edu
(815) 753-6418






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From dwilley+@pitt.edu Sun Oct 31 05:22:37 2004

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