Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 11:31:18 -0500

Author: Wolfgang Rueckner

Subject: Re: food physics

Post:

I don't want to spoil the party, but .... some of these ideas do
NOT sound like a good idea for presentations to 6th graders! Safety
and the possibility that they'll go home and try this to amuse their
friends should be of primary concern for a younger audience. ....
Now I'll go -- Wolfgang



> Cook a Hot Dog with the standard AC
>wall current.
> You can hook up the AC to 2 steel dinner forks, using a variac, one
>line connected to each fork by an alligator clip (you can make a
>"cheater cord" out of an extension cord by cutting off the receptacle
>end and attaching an alligator clip to each wire). Next complete the
>circuit by sticking each fork into the end of a Hot Dog, making sure
>that the set up is stable(clamp each for to a lab stand, etc.). Power up
>the Variac and slowly turn up the voltage. The hot dog will cook. You
>could also use a large Dill Pickle, and the pickle will glow nicely.
>
>Tony
>
>--
>
>Tony Papirio
>Lab Director Physics Teaching Labs
>Dept. of Physics (fax) 413-545-1691
>218 Hasbrouck Physics Lab (voice)413-545-1296
>University of Massachusetts Email: papirio@physics.umass.edu
>Amherst, MA, 01003-3720
>http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~tpapirio
>
>http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~tpapirio/LAB_HOME.HTML
From reberg@physics.umd.edu Tue Dec 16 11:31:43 2003
X-Authentication-Warning: student1.physics.umd.edu: reberg owned process doing -bs
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 11:31:44 -0500 (EST)
From: Richard Berg
To: "James R. Frysinger"
cc: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: Re: food physics
In-Reply-To: <200312161056.51616.frysingerj@cofc.edu>
Message-ID:
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=X-UNKNOWN
X-MailScanner-Information: Please contact the Helpdesk @ 6266 for more information
X-MailScanner-ASU-mta3: Found to be clean
X-MailScanner-SpamCheck: not spam, SpamAssassin (score=0, required 7)
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
X-MIME-Autoconverted: from QUOTED-PRINTABLE to 8bit by listproc.appstate.edu id hBGGVh4Q025967
Reply-To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Sender: owner-tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.2.10/991025/16:55 -- ListProc(tm) by CREN

Look carefully and notice that I said "Cook up some small pieces of ground
beef ........."

Dick

On Tue, 16 Dec 2003, James R. Frysinger wrote:

> I hate to be a curmudgeon here, Dick, but I don't recommend this for the
> classroom due to liability issues.
>
> The FDA guidelines recommend not eating beef until it has been cooked; as far
> as I know, steak tartar is not on their OK list.
>
> As a more subtle point, irradiation kills most micro-organisms but there is no
> guarantee that it has killed them all, especially that one particular little
> beastie who is out to ruin your teaching career. If you're outside the
> guidelines, it's harder to defend yourself.
>
> Personally, I would not serve sushi in the classroom for the same reason. In
> fact, what little food I serve comes from a commercial establishment, such as
> a pizzaria (let them take the lawsuit!), or is something fairly safe, such as
> a pan of brownies that I baked the night before.
>
> Jim
>
> On Tuesday, 2003 December 16 10:05, Richard Berg wrote:
> > Cook up some small pieces of irradiated ground beef for them to eat
> > with nice sauces, and discuss how irradiation can prevent illness and
> > death due to salmonella, e. coli, and other foodborn pathogens.
> >
> > Dick Berg
> >
> > ***********************************************************************
> > Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
> > Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
> > U.S. mail address:
> > Department of Physics
> > University of Maryland
> > College Park, MD 20742-4111
> > Phone: (301) 405-5994
> > FAX: (301) 314-9525
> > e-mail reberg@physics.umd.edu
> > www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
> > ***********************************************************************
>
> --
>
> James R. Frysinger
> Lifetime Certified Advanced Metrication Specialist
> Senior Member, IEEE
>
> http://www.cofc.edu/~frysingj
> frysingerj@cofc.edu
> j.frysinger@ieee.org
>
> Office:
> Physics Lab Manager, Lecturer
> Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
> University/College of Charleston
> 66 George Street
> Charleston, SC 29424
> 843.953.7644 (phone)
> 843.953.4824 (FAX)
>
> Home:
> 10 Captiva Row
> Charleston, SC 29407
> 843.225.0805
>
>
>

***********************************************************************
Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
U.S. mail address:
Department of Physics
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-4111
Phone: (301) 405-5994
FAX: (301) 314-9525
e-mail reberg@physics.umd.edu
www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
***********************************************************************

From mary@phy.duke.edu Tue Dec 16 11:44:43 2003
Message-ID: <1071593137.3fdf36b172c0c@webmail.duke.edu>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 11:45:37 -0500
From: Mary Creason
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: Re: food physics
References: <3FDE919F.7080500@physics.niu.edu>
In-Reply-To: <3FDE919F.7080500@physics.niu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
User-Agent: Internet Messaging Program (IMP) 3.2.1
X-MailScanner-Information: Please contact the Helpdesk @ 6266 for more information
X-MailScanner-ASU-mta2: Found to be clean
X-MailScanner-SpamCheck: not spam, SpamAssassin (score=0, required 7)
Reply-To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Sender: owner-tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.2.10/991025/16:55 -- ListProc(tm) by CREN

Thermometer in the baked potato to show Newton's Law of cooling (while sipping
Hot Chocolate - the value of waiting those first few minutes to avoid scalding
your mouth).

Reiterate the Gelatin Lenses mentioned before:
Knox Gelatin (clear), filters (with food coloring), model of glaucoma (add
powdered milk), lens stiffining (more concentrated gelatin).

Making carbonated beverages with Dry Ice in flavored drinks (Hi-C, water/sugar/
rootbeer flavor)


Quoting Patricia Sievert :

> Hi. Anyone have any ideas what one of my colleagues could take into his
> 6th grade daughter's classroom on the physics of food? We've already
> talked about several things he could do with LN2, but I couldn't come up
> with much else off the top of my head. He'll just be there for a few
> hours, so no time to do rock candy crystals. (we're talking mid to late
> Jan, not tomorrow.)
> Pati
>
> --
> ----
> Pati Sievert, Outreach Coordinator
> ICAR
> Department of Physics
> Northern Illinois University
> DeKalb, Il 60115
> sievert@physics.niu.edu
> 815-753-6418
> www.physics.niu.edu/~frontier
>
>


--
Mary Creason, Lecturer
Physics Department
Duke University
Box 90305
Durham, NC 27708
919-668-2659
FAX 919-660-2525
From ezrailson@yahoo.com Tue Dec 16 11:46:03 2003
Message-ID: <20031216163601.49420.qmail@web41204.mail.yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 08:36:01 -0800 (PST)
From: Cathy Mariotti Ezrailson
Reply-To: ezrailson@yahoo.com
Subject: Physics of Lollipops
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
In-Reply-To: <3FDF23E6.A4FCAF5C@physics.umass.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="0-302462327-1071592561=:48748"
X-MailScanner-Information: Please contact the Helpdesk @ 6266 for more information
X-MailScanner-ASU-mta1: Found to be clean
X-MailScanner-SpamCheck: not spam, SpamAssassin (score=0.201, required 7,
HTML_FONTCOLOR_RED 0.10, HTML_FONTCOLOR_UNSAFE 0.10,
HTML_MESSAGE 0.00)
Sender: owner-tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.2.10/991025/16:55 -- ListProc(tm) by CREN

--0-302462327-1071592561=:48748
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Pati,
I did a thermo lab some years ago at Lee College on the physics of lollipops. It is a bit too involved for early elementary, but the subject isn't. The fact that amorphous solids (glass-like solids) have a range of melting points is worth the trouble and the kids can eat the products! I will try to find my old link and get you the instructions.
Take care,
Cathy

Tony Papirio wrote:
Cook a Hot Dog with the standard AC
wall current.
You can hook up the AC to 2 steel dinner forks, using a variac, one
line connected to each fork by an alligator clip (you can make a
"cheater cord" out of an extension cord by cutting off the receptacle
end and attaching an alligator clip to each wire). Next complete the
circuit by sticking each fork into the end of a Hot Dog, making sure
that the set up is stable(clamp each for to a lab stand, etc.). Power up
the Variac and slowly turn up the voltage. The hot dog will cook. You
could also use a large Dill Pickle, and the pickle will glow nicely.

Tony

--

Tony Papirio
Lab Director Physics Teaching Labs
Dept. of Physics (fax) 413-545-1691
218 Hasbrouck Physics Lab (voice)413-545-1296
University of Massachusetts Email: papirio@physics.umass.edu
Amherst, MA, 01003-3720
http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~tpapirio

http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~tpapirio/LAB_HOME.HTML


Cathy Mariotti Ezrailson, 4232 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, cmariotti@tamu.edu Ph 281-773-5458 http://www.coe.tamu.edu/~cezrailson
Learning is ever in the freshness of its youth, even for the old. Aeschilus
What we observe is not nature itself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning. -- Werner Heisenberg
It is wrong to think that the task of physics is to find out how nature is. Physics concerns what we can say about nature. --Niels Bohr





--0-302462327-1071592561=:48748
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii

Pati,

I did a thermo lab some years ago at Lee College on the physics of lollipops. It is a bit too involved for early elementary, but the subject isn't. The fact that amorphous solids (glass-like solids) have a range of melting points is worth the trouble and the kids can eat the products! I will try to find my old link and get you the instructions.

Take care,

Cathy

Tony Papirio <papirio@physics.umass.edu> wrote:

Cook a Hot Dog with the standard AC
wall current.
You can hook up the AC to 2 steel dinner forks, using a variac, one
line connected to each fork by an alligator clip (you can make a
"cheater cord" out of an extension cord by cutting off the receptacle
end and attaching an alligator clip to each wire). Next complete the
circuit by sticking each fork into the end of a Hot Dog, making sure
that the set up is stable(clamp each for to a lab stand, etc.). Power up
the Variac and slowly turn up the voltage. The hot dog will cook. You
could also use a large Dill Pickle, and the pickle will glow nicely.

Tony

--

Tony Papirio
Lab Director Physics Teaching Labs
Dept. of Physics (fax) 413-545-1691
218 Hasbrouck Physics Lab (voice)413-545-1296
University of Massachusetts Email: papirio@physics.umass.edu
Amherst, MA,
01003-3720
http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~tpapirio

http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~tpapirio/LAB_HOME.HTML





Cathy Mariotti Ezrailson, 4232 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, cmariotti@tamu.edu Ph 281-773-5458 http://www.coe.tamu.edu/~cezrailson
Learning is ever in the freshness of its youth, even for the old. Aeschilus
What we observe is not nature itself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning. -- Werner Heisenberg
It is wrong to think that the task of physics is to find out how nature is. Physics concerns what we can say about nature. --Niels Bohr

--0-302462327-1071592561=:48748--
From cary@arborsci.com Tue Dec 16 12:23:05 2003
Content-Class: urn:content-classes:message
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01C3C3F9.4A2AF2AC"
Subject: RE: food physics
X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft Exchange V6.0.6249.0
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 12:23:15 -0500
Message-ID: <25CF782B10A23144AFF0FD4E57DFA5181ACD1E@asdc.as.local>
X-MS-Has-Attach:
X-MS-TNEF-Correlator:
Thread-Topic: food physics
thread-index: AcPD32BRrQlGEhZ3SvehR96qrihsAwAGdE2A
From: "Cary Busby"
To:
X-MailScanner-Information: Please contact the Helpdesk @ 6266 for more information
X-MailScanner-ASU-mta3: Found to be clean
X-MailScanner-SpamCheck: not spam, SpamAssassin (score=0.284, required 7,
HTML_50_60 0.18, HTML_FONTCOLOR_BLUE 0.10, HTML_MESSAGE 0.00)
Reply-To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Sender: owner-tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.2.10/991025/16:55 -- ListProc(tm) by CREN

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------_=_NextPart_001_01C3C3F9.4A2AF2AC
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

John,
=20
Sounds like a great book. To what does the title refer?
=20
Cary

-----Original Message-----
From: John L. Hubisz [mailto:hubisz@mindspring.com]=20
Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2003 8:47 AM
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Cc: Hubisz@unity.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: food physics
=09
=09
I suggest But the Crackling is Superb edited by Nicholas and
Giana Kurti and published by Adam Hilger in 1988.
=09
=09


------_=_NextPart_001_01C3C3F9.4A2AF2AC
Content-Type: text/html;
charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


Message
charset=3Dus-ascii">



size=3D2>John,


size=3D2>
 

size=3D2>Sounds=20
like a great book.  To what does the title =
refer?


size=3D2>
 


size=3D2>Cary



align=3Dleft> face=3DTahoma size=3D2>-----Original Message-----
From: John =
L. Hubisz=20
[mailto:hubisz@mindspring.com]
Sent: Tuesday, December 16, =
2003=20
8:47 AM
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Cc:=20
Hubisz@unity.ncsu.edu
Subject: Re: food=20
physics

I suggest But the Crackling is =
Superb
=20
edited by Nicholas and Giana Kurti and published by Adam Hilger in=20
1988.


=00
------_=_NextPart_001_01C3C3F9.4A2AF2AC--
From frysingerj@cofc.edu Tue Dec 16 12:34:01 2003
From: "James R. Frysinger"
Reply-To: frysingerj@cofc.edu
Organization: College of Charleston
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: Re: food physics
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 12:34:46 -0500
User-Agent: KMail/1.5.1
References:
In-Reply-To:
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline

Back