Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 09:10:51 -0500

Author: Gerald Zani

Subject: RE: food physics

Post:

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Pati,

You can do these:

1) Lemon. Make a battery and light an LED or buzz a piezo buzzer.
2) Potato. Make a battery to power a clock.
3) Eggs. Throw and catch it with a sheet to discuss impulse.
4) Cornstarch. Make Oobleck and talk about quick sand and non-Newtonian
fluids.
5) Vinegar and baking soda. Fill a balloon and discuss pressure and the
kinetic theory of gas molecules.

>Anyone have any ideas what one of my colleagues could take into his
>
>6th grade daughter's classroom on the physics of food? We've already
>talked about several things he could do with LN2, but I couldn't come up
>
>with much else off the top of my head. He'll just be there for a few
>hours, so no time to do rock candy crystals. (we're talking mid to late
>
>Jan, not tomorrow.)
>Pati


Hope this helps,
Jerry Z.


Gerald Zani e-mail: Gerald_Zani@brown.edu
Manager of Demonstrations phone: (401) 863-3964
Department of Physics FAX: (401) 863-2024
Brown University Providence, RI 02912-1843 USA

URL http://www.physics.brown.edu/users/staff/zani/index.html
URL http://www.physics.brown.edu/Studies/Demo/

Do a little more of that work which you have confessed to be good,
Which you feel that society and your most Just Judge rightly demand of you.
Cultivate the tree which you have found to bear fruit in your soil.
If you have any experiments you would like to try, try them.
Now's your chance.
Henry David Thoreau, Journal entry, 1850.
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Pati,


You can do these:


1) Lemon.  Make a battery and light an LED or buzz a piezo
buzzer.

2) Potato.  Make a battery to power a clock.

3) Eggs.  Throw and catch it with a sheet to discuss impulse.

4) Cornstarch.  Make Oobleck and talk about quick sand and
non-Newtonian fluids.

5) Vinegar and baking soda.  Fill a balloon and discuss pressure and
the kinetic theory of gas molecules.




Anyone have any ideas what one of my colleagues could take into
his



6th grade daughter's classroom on the physics of food? We've already
talked about several things he could do with LN2, but I couldn't come
up



with much else off the top of my head. He'll just be there for a few
hours, so no time to do rock candy crystals. (we're talking mid to
late



Jan, not tomorrow.)
Pati




Hope this helps,

Jerry Z.




Gerald
Zani                     e-mail:
Gerald_Zani@brown.edu

Manager of
Demonstrations       phone:
(401) 863-3964

Department of
Physics           FAX:  
(401) 863-2024

Brown
University                Providence,
RI 02912-1843 USA

 

URL
http://www.physics.brown.edu/users/staff/zani/index.html

URL
http://www.physics.brown.edu/Studies/Demo/

 

Do a little more of that work which you have confessed to be
good,

Which you feel that society and your most Just Judge rightly demand
of you.

Cultivate the tree which you have found to bear fruit in your
soil. 

If you have any experiments you would like to try, try them.

Now's your chance. 

Henry David Thoreau, Journal entry, 1850.


--=====================_1421133==.ALT--
From sampere@physics.syr.edu Tue Dec 16 09:20:34 2003
Message-ID: <3FDF14D5.30508@physics.syr.edu>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 09:21:09 -0500
From: sampere
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To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: Re: food physics
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Thanks for the great idea. You know what I 'll be doing tonight! That
sounds fun and delicious. Hmmmmm, I wonder what else I can do with warm
carmel sauce up here in snowy Central New York.

Sam

John L. Hubisz wrote:

> I suggest But the Crackling is Superb edited by Nicholas and Giana
> Kurti and published by Adam Hilger in 1988.
>
> My favorite for kids is: "Boiled Can."
>
>
> BOILED CAN: A DELECTABLE CARAMEL SAUCE
>
> Take one can of sweetened condensed milk (for example, Borden Eagle
> Brand, Sweetened Condensed Milk), large or small, depending on the
> number of servings expected. Place in a saucepan without opening,
> cover with water and a lid, and boil for a period of approximately 60
> to 75 minutes, according to the degree of caramel­ization that you
> wish (check water level from time to time, of course). This has to be
> determined experimentally, but the times given work well. Remove can
> from saucepan carefully, open can, empty into a bowl, stir the
> contents lightly to ensure homogenization. Pour over ice cream, cake,
> or other dessert. Thanks to Seymour Rabinovitch.
>
>
> John
>
> At 12:01 AM 12/16/2003, Patricia Sievert wrote:
>
>> Hi. Anyone have any ideas what one of my colleagues could take into
>> his 6th grade daughter's classroom on the physics of food? We've
>> already talked about several things he could do with LN2, but I
>> couldn't come up with much else off the top of my head. He'll just
>> be there for a few hours, so no time to do rock candy crystals.
>> (we're talking mid to late Jan, not tomorrow.)
>> Pati
>>
>> --
>> ----
>> Pati Sievert, Outreach Coordinator
>> ICAR
>> Department of Physics
>> Northern Illinois University
>> DeKalb, Il 60115
>> sievert@physics.niu.edu
>> 815-753-6418
>> www.physics.niu.edu/~frontier
>>
>>
> John L. Hubisz, Physics Department, Box 8202, North Carolina State
> University, Raleigh NC 27695-8202; hubisz@unity.ncsu.edu,
> (919)515-2515, (919)515-7331 FAX
>
> http://www.science-house.org/middleschool/
> http://www.physics.ncsu.edu/ncsaapt/
>
> HOME: 1604 South Salem Street, Apex NC 27502-7251,
> hubisz@mindspring.com, (919)362-5782 (Voice & FAX)
>

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Thanks for the great idea.  You know what I 'll be doing tonight!  That
sounds fun and delicious.  Hmmmmm, I wonder what else I can do with
warm carmel sauce up here in snowy Central New York.



Sam



John L. Hubisz wrote:

cite="mid6.0.1.1.2.20031216084327.02c983f0@pop-in.ncsu.edu">I suggest But
the Crackling is Superb
edited by Nicholas and Giana
Kurti and published by Adam Hilger in 1988.



My favorite for kids is:  "Boiled Can."



 

BOILED CAN: A DELECTABLE CARAMEL SAUCE


 

Take one can of sweetened condensed milk (for example, Borden Eagle
Brand, Sweetened Condensed Milk), large or small, depending on the
number
of servings expected.  Place in a saucepan without opening, cover
with water and a lid, and boil for a period of approximately 60 to 75
minutes, according to the degree of caramel­ization that you wish
(check
water level from time to time, of course).  This has to be
determined experimentally, but the times given work well.  Remove
can from saucepan carefully, open can, empty into a bowl, stir the
contents lightly to ensure homogenization.  Pour over ice cream,
cake, or other dessert.  Thanks to Seymour Rabinovitch.





John



At 12:01 AM 12/16/2003, Patricia Sievert wrote:

Hi.  Anyone have any
ideas
what one of my colleagues could take into his 6th grade daughter's
classroom on the physics of food?  We've already talked about
several things he could do with LN2, but I couldn't come up with much
else off the top of my head.  He'll just be there for a few hours,
so no time to do rock candy crystals.  (we're talking mid to late
Jan, not tomorrow.)

Pati



--

----

Pati Sievert, Outreach Coordinator

ICAR

Department of Physics

Northern Illinois University

DeKalb, Il 60115

sievert@physics.niu.edu

815-753-6418

www.physics.niu.edu/~frontier







John L. Hubisz, Physics Department, Box 8202, North Carolina State
University, Raleigh  NC  27695-8202; hubisz@unity.ncsu.edu,
(919)515-2515, (919)515-7331 FAX



http://www.science-house.org/middleschool/

http://www.physics.ncsu.edu/ncsaapt/



HOME: 1604 South Salem Street, Apex  NC  27502-7251,
hubisz@mindspring.com, (919)362-5782 (Voice & FAX)






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From jfeliciano@notes.cc.sunysb.edu Tue Dec 16 09:25:56 2003
In-Reply-To: <3FDE919F.7080500@physics.niu.edu>
Subject: Re: food physics
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A few years ago the Physics teacher magazine had an article in which the
wave length of a microwave oven was measured using marshmallow's. Actually
it went on to measure the speed of light with the measurement, but that may
be a little too complicated for 6th graders. The other important element
in this experiment is the need for a microwave oven that does not rotate.
I don't know how difficult it would be to find one of those. Anyway that's
the only food experiment I can come up with for now.

Joe



Patricia Sievert
du> cc:
Sent by: Subject: food physics
owner-tap-l@listproc.a
ppstate.edu


12/16/2003 12:01 AM
Please respond to
tap-l





Hi. Anyone have any ideas what one of my colleagues could take into his
6th grade daughter's classroom on the physics of food? We've already
talked about several things he could do with LN2, but I couldn't come up
with much else off the top of my head. He'll just be there for a few
hours, so no time to do rock candy crystals. (we're talking mid to late
Jan, not tomorrow.)
Pati

--
----
Pati Sievert, Outreach Coordinator
ICAR
Department of Physics
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, Il 60115
sievert@physics.niu.edu
815-753-6418
www.physics.niu.edu/~frontier



From tomford@thesciencesource.com Tue Dec 16 09:45:23 2003

Back