Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 11:31:46 -0400

Author: "Fred Stein"

Subject: Re: linseed oil (was exothermic/endothermic)

Post:

A chemist would probably say that the the reaction is exothermic because the energy of bond formation (drying) is greater then the energy of bond breaking.
Fred

Dr. Fredrick M. Stein
Director of Education and Outreach
American Physical Society
One Physics Ellipse
College Park, MD 20740-3844
(301) 209-3263
(301) 209-0865 fax
stein@aps.org
http://www.aps.org/educ/

>>> pschran1@swarthmore.edu 09/24/03 10:29AM >>>
OK, now you've sparked my interest! Why does
linseed oil GENERATE heat as it dries? This
can't be simple evaporation going on here.....

Gotta love these meandering topics...

Prue

>Linseed oil soaked materials may spontaneously
>ignite. Linseed Oil generates heat as it dries
>(an EXOTHERMIC reaction). This heat generated as
>it dries can cause spontaneous ignition of
>materials contacted by Linseed Oil. Oily rags or
>waste and other oily materials can cause
>spontaneous combustion fires if not handled
>properly. Immediately after use, and before
>disposal or storage, you MUST (1) spread out all
>oily materials outside to dry by flattening them
>out to their full size in an any spot for 24
>hours at temperatures above 40 F.
>Fred
>
>Dr. Fredrick M. Stein
>Director of Education and Outreach
>American Physical Society
>One Physics Ellipse
>College Park, MD 20740-3844
>(301) 209-3263
>(301) 209-0865 fax
>stein@aps.org
>http://www.aps.org/educ/
>
>>>> reberg@physics.umd.edu 09/24/03 09:35AM >>>
>I am not a chemist, but isn't this what happens if you leave a rag
>saturated with linseed oil in a confined place? I use linseed oil on my
>outdoor lawn furniture, and noticed the warnings about not leaving cloths,
>brushes, etc. soaked with linseed oil around because of the danger of
>spontaneous combustion. I have read some of the warning stuff that comes
>with virtually every chemical (including water!), so I really didn't
>believe that stuff, UNTIL I TRIED IT. Truly frightening. A linseed oil
>soaked rag in a bag actually bursts into flame in a very short time.
>
>Dick Berg
>

--



***********************************
Prue Schran, Lecturer
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Swarthmore College
Swarthmore, PA 19081-1390
pschran1@swarthmore.edu
(610)690-6886 office
(610)328-7895 fax
***********************************

"The number you have dialed is
imaginary. Rotate phone 90 degrees
and try again."




From sampere@physics.syr.edu Wed Sep 24 09:21:52 2003
Message-ID: <3F71C0A7.3010503@physics.syr.edu>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 12:04:55 -0400
From: sampere
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Subject: Re: linseed oil (was exothermic/endothermic)
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What's happening when the oil is drying? I think of drying as the
evaporation of H2O, which I'm pretty sure is not the case here. Is the
solvent evaporating? If so, what's the bonding? Or is this oxidation?

Sam

Fred Stein wrote:

>A chemist would probably say that the the reaction is exothermic because the energy of bond formation (drying) is greater then the energy of bond breaking.
>Fred
>
>Dr. Fredrick M. Stein
>Director of Education and Outreach
>American Physical Society
>One Physics Ellipse
>College Park, MD 20740-3844
>(301) 209-3263
>(301) 209-0865 fax
>stein@aps.org
>http://www.aps.org/educ/
>
>
>
>>>>pschran1@swarthmore.edu 09/24/03 10:29AM >>>
>>>>
>>>>
>OK, now you've sparked my interest! Why does
>linseed oil GENERATE heat as it dries? This
>can't be simple evaporation going on here.....
>
>Gotta love these meandering topics...
>
>Prue
>
>
>
>>Linseed oil soaked materials may spontaneously
>>ignite. Linseed Oil generates heat as it dries
>>(an EXOTHERMIC reaction). This heat generated as
>>it dries can cause spontaneous ignition of
>>materials contacted by Linseed Oil. Oily rags or
>>waste and other oily materials can cause
>>spontaneous combustion fires if not handled
>>properly. Immediately after use, and before
>>disposal or storage, you MUST (1) spread out all
>>oily materials outside to dry by flattening them
>>out to their full size in an any spot for 24
>>hours at temperatures above 40 F.
>>Fred
>>
>>Dr. Fredrick M. Stein
>>Director of Education and Outreach
>>American Physical Society
>>One Physics Ellipse
>>College Park, MD 20740-3844
>>(301) 209-3263
>>(301) 209-0865 fax
>>stein@aps.org
>>http://www.aps.org/educ/
>>
>>
>>
>>>>> reberg@physics.umd.edu 09/24/03 09:35AM >>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>I am not a chemist, but isn't this what happens if you leave a rag
>>saturated with linseed oil in a confined place? I use linseed oil on my
>>outdoor lawn furniture, and noticed the warnings about not leaving cloths,
>>brushes, etc. soaked with linseed oil around because of the danger of
>>spontaneous combustion. I have read some of the warning stuff that comes
>>with virtually every chemical (including water!), so I really didn't
>>believe that stuff, UNTIL I TRIED IT. Truly frightening. A linseed oil
>>soaked rag in a bag actually bursts into flame in a very short time.
>>
>>Dick Berg
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>

--------------040108030701080202090502
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit








What's happening when the oil is drying?  I think of drying as the
evaporation of H2O, which I'm pretty sure is not the case here.  Is the
solvent evaporating? If so, what's the bonding?  Or is this oxidation?



Sam



Fred Stein wrote:


A chemist would probably say that the the reaction is exothermic because the energy of bond formation (drying) is greater then the energy of bond breaking.
Fred

Dr. Fredrick M. Stein
Director of Education and Outreach
American Physical Society
One Physics Ellipse
College Park, MD 20740-3844
(301) 209-3263
(301) 209-0865 fax
stein@aps.org
http://www.aps.org/educ/





pschran1@swarthmore.edu 09/24/03 10:29AM >>>




OK, now you've sparked my interest!  Why does 
linseed oil GENERATE heat as it dries? This
can't be simple evaporation going on here.....

Gotta love these meandering topics...

Prue



Linseed oil soaked materials may spontaneously 
ignite. Linseed Oil generates heat as it dries
(an EXOTHERMIC reaction). This heat generated as
it dries can cause spontaneous ignition of
materials contacted by Linseed Oil. Oily rags or
waste and other oily materials can cause
spontaneous combustion fires if not handled
properly. Immediately after use, and before
disposal or storage, you MUST (1) spread out all
oily materials outside to dry by flattening them
out to their full size in an any spot for 24
hours at temperatures above 40° F.
Fred

Dr. Fredrick M. Stein
Director of Education and Outreach
American Physical Society
One Physics Ellipse
College Park, MD 20740-3844
(301) 209-3263
(301) 209-0865 fax
stein@aps.org
http://www.aps.org/educ/





 reberg@physics.umd.edu 09/24/03 09:35AM >>>




I am not a chemist, but isn't this what happens if you leave a rag
saturated with linseed oil in a confined place? I use linseed oil on my
outdoor lawn furniture, and noticed the warnings about not leaving cloths,
brushes, etc. soaked with linseed oil around because of the danger of
spontaneous combustion. I have read some of the warning stuff that comes
with virtually every chemical (including water!), so I really didn't
believe that stuff, UNTIL I TRIED IT. Truly frightening. A linseed oil
soaked rag in a bag actually bursts into flame in a very short time.

Dick Berg









--------------040108030701080202090502--
From Jossem@mps.ohio-state.edu Wed Sep 24 10:01:28 2003
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 12:44:29 -0400
From: "E.L. Jossem"
Subject: Re: linseed oil (was exothermic/endothermic)
In-reply-to: <3F71C0A7.3010503@physics.syr.edu>
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http://ptcl.chem.ox.ac.uk/MSDS/LI/linseed_oil.html

Safety (MSDS) data for linseed oil

------------------------------------------------------------------------

General


Synonyms: acid refined linseed oil, flaxseed oil, linseed oil fatty
acids, linseed fatty acids glycerin ester, bleached linseed oil,
groco, L-310, linseed
Molecular formula: (Constituents are glycerides of linolenic,
linoleic, oleic, stearic, palmitic and myristic acids.)
CAS No: 8001-26-1
EINECS No:

Physical data

Appearance: yellow to dark amber liquid with a paint-like odour
Melting point: -19 C
Boiling point: 343 C
Vapour density:
Vapour pressure:
Density (g cm-3): 0.93
Flash point: 222 C
Explosion limits:
Autoignition temperature: 343 C



Stability

Stable, but polymerizes gradually upon exposure to air. Combustible.
Incompatible with strong oxidizing agents. Reacts violently with
chlorine. Material such as rags impregnated with linseed oil may
spontaneously combust after a long induction period due to gradual
exothermic reaction with oxygen.


Toxicology

Skin irritant. May be allergenic.

Irritation data
(The meaning of any abbreviations which appear in this section is given here.)
SKN-HMN 300 mg/3d-I mod.



Transport information

Non-hazardous for air, sea and road freight.

Personal protection

Gloves. Adequate ventilation.

[Return to Physical & Theoretical Chemistry Lab. Safety home page.]
------------------------------------------------------------------------

This information was last updated on September 3, 2003. We have tried
to make it as accurate and useful as possible, but can take no
responsibility for its use, misuse, or accuracy.

--Boundary_(ID_PGH3pKdgPI0fFWnfBspTgQ)
Content-type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
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Re: linseed oil (was<br> exothermic/endothermic)








http://ptcl.chem.ox.ac.uk/MSDS/LI/linseed_oil.html face="Times New Roman" size="-4" color="#000000">

 

color="#0000FF">Safety (MSDS) data for linseed oil face="Times New Roman" size="-4" color="#000000">



--------------------------------------------------------------------- >---



color="#000000">General size="+1" color="#000000">

 



Synonyms: acid refined linseed oil, flaxseed oil, linseed oil fatty
acids, linseed fatty acids glycerin ester, bleached linseed oil,
groco, L-310, linseed

Molecular formula: (Constituents are glycerides of linolenic,
linoleic, oleic, stearic, palmitic and myristic acids.)

CAS No: 8001-26-1

EINECS No:



color="#000000">Physical data face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">



Appearance: yellow to dark amber liquid with a paint-like odour

Melting point: -19 C

Boiling point: 343 C

Vapour density:

Vapour pressure:

Density (g cm color="#000000">-3 color="#000000">): 0.93

Flash point: 222 C

Explosion limits:

Autoignition temperature: 343 C







color="#000000">Stability size="+1" color="#000000">



Stable, but polymerizes gradually upon exposure to air. Combustible.
Incompatible with strong oxidizing agents. Reacts violently with
chlorine. Material such as rags impregnated with linseed oil may
spontaneously combust after a long induction period due to gradual
exothermic reaction with oxygen.





color="#000000">Toxicology size="+1" color="#000000">



Skin irritant. May be allergenic.



color="#0000FF">Irritation data face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">

(The meaning of any abbreviations which appear in this section is
given
here.
color="#000000">)

SKN-HMN 300 mg/3d-I mod.







color="#000000">Transport information face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">



Non-hazardous for air, sea and road freight.



color="#000000">Personal protection face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">



Gloves. Adequate ventilation.



[Return
to

Physical & Theoretical Chemistry Lab. Safety home
page.]
color="#000000">

--------------------------------------------------------------------- >---


This
information was last updated on September 3, 2003. We have tried to
make it as accurate and useful as possible, but can take no
responsibility for its use, misuse, or accuracy.




--Boundary_(ID_PGH3pKdgPI0fFWnfBspTgQ)--
From edwardsabol@hotmail.com Wed Sep 24 10:14:49 2003
X-Originating-IP: [209.123.238.86]
X-Originating-Email: [edwardsabol@hotmail.com]
From: "Edward Sabol"
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: Linseed oil
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 16:58:05 +0000
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ust a note of caution: if tempted to throw out flax seed oil (linseed oil),
be careful that it does not end up on cloth or paper in a receptacle - this
is the stuff that fire departments warn about when they say to avoid oily
rags in the garage, as a source of spontaneous combustion (they are not
referring to motor oil); flax-seed (linseed) oil was once used as a base for
oil paints, and alone as a varnish, because it is a "drying" oil, which
means that it reacts with the atmosphere to polymerize, forming a
plastic-like material - the process releases heat, and if it is contained
sothat the heat cannot escape as fast as it is generated, it can build up to
burning temperatures.

Linseed oil is not the only oil which can do this - just about any oil which
decomposes on contact with the air is a candidate. For instance, a lady
working for The Essential Oil Company was dispensing benzaldehyde (the smell
of cherries associated with oil of bitter almond) wiped up a spill with
paper towels and threw the the waste into the trash; when she noticed the
smell getting stronger and stronger, she started poking around to find the
source and nearly burned herself - if she had been working with something
that had less of an odor, she might not have discovered it before going home
for the day.

Just one more tip concerning storage: if possible, keep bottles upright to
provide less surface area, and use as small of a bottle as possible to
contain the reactive material. Wheaton, a bottle manufacturer in New Jersey,
makes something called an "amber dropping bottle" which is made of
pharmaceutical brown glass with a ground-glass stopper, and the stopper has
two grooves molded halfway down, while the neck has matching grooves molded
halfway up - when the grooves match up, the contents can be dispensed
through one set of grooves while just enough air to displace the fluid is
allowed to enter through the other. Unfortunately, the grooves may be too
narrow to allow viscous fluids such as linseed oil to pass easily, and they
may allow very fluid materials to flow more rapidly than desired, but the
concept is good.

-Douglas Wiggins zoron.nwcs.org, Portland, Oregon

_________________________________________________________________
Frustrated with dial-up? Get high-speed for as low as $29.95/month
(depending on the local service providers in your area).
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From sampere@physics.syr.edu Wed Sep 24 10:26:30 2003
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Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 13:09:42 -0400
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Subject: Re: linseed oil (was exothermic/endothermic)
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Cool, thanks.

We want the stuff to polymerize, that's why we apply it to wood, right?
Oxidation is the exothermic reaction that causes the increase in
temperature. So, if we put a balled up rag full of linseed oil into
glovebox filled with N2, then we wouldn't have to worry about combustion
because it wouldn't oxidize. But it would still polymerize. Right?

Sam

E.L. Jossem wrote:

>
>
>
>
> http://ptcl.chem.ox.ac.uk/MSDS/LI/linseed_oil.html
>
> Safety (MSDS) data for linseed oil
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> General
>
>
> Synonyms: acid refined linseed oil, flaxseed oil, linseed oil fatty
> acids, linseed fatty acids glycerin ester, bleached linseed oil,
> groco, L-310, linseed
> Molecular formula: (Constituents are glycerides of linolenic,
> linoleic, oleic, stearic, palmitic and myristic acids.)
> CAS No: 8001-26-1
> EINECS No:
>
> Physical data
>
> Appearance: yellow to dark amber liquid with a paint-like odour
> Melting point: -19 C
> Boiling point: 343 C
> Vapour density:
> Vapour pressure:
> Density (g cm-3): 0.93
> Flash point: 222 C
> Explosion limits:
> Autoignition temperature: 343 C
>
>
>
> Stability
>
> Stable, but polymerizes gradually upon exposure to air. Combustible.
> Incompatible with strong oxidizing agents. Reacts violently with
> chlorine. Material such as rags impregnated with linseed oil may
> spontaneously combust after a long induction period due to gradual
> exothermic reaction with oxygen.
>
>
> Toxicology
>
> Skin irritant. May be allergenic.
>
> Irritation data
> (The meaning of any abbreviations which appear in this section is
> given here.)
> SKN-HMN 300 mg/3d-I mod.
>
>
>
> Transport information
>
> Non-hazardous for air, sea and road freight.
>
> Personal protection
>
> Gloves. Adequate ventilation.
>
> [Return to Physical & Theoretical Chemistry Lab. Safety home page.]
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This information was last updated on September 3, 2003. We have tried
> to make it as accurate and useful as possible, but can take no
> responsibility for its use, misuse, or accuracy.


--------------010303020201010501040000
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit








Cool, thanks. 



We want the stuff to polymerize, that's why we apply it to wood,
right?  Oxidation is the exothermic reaction that causes the increase
in temperature.  So, if we put a balled up rag full of linseed oil into
glovebox filled with N2, then we wouldn't have to worry about
combustion because it wouldn't oxidize.  But it would still
polymerize.  Right?



Sam



E.L. Jossem wrote:

cite="midp0510030abb9779ec5e1e@%5B128.146.38.235%5D">

Re: linseed oil (was<br> exothermic/endothermic)












http://ptcl.chem.ox.ac.uk/MSDS/LI/linseed_oil.html face="Times New Roman" size="-4" color="#000000">

 

Safety
(MSDS) data for linseed oil
size="-4" color="#000000">



------------------------------------------------------------------------



General face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">

 



Synonyms: acid refined linseed oil, flaxseed oil, linseed oil fatty
acids, linseed fatty acids glycerin ester, bleached linseed oil,
groco, L-310, linseed

Molecular formula: (Constituents are glycerides of linolenic,
linoleic, oleic, stearic, palmitic and myristic acids.)

CAS No: 8001-26-1

EINECS No:



Physical
data




Appearance: yellow to dark amber liquid with a paint-like odour

Melting point: -19 C

Boiling point: 343 C

Vapour density:

Vapour pressure:

Density (g cm
color="#000000">-3 color="#000000">): 0.93

Flash point: 222 C

Explosion limits:

Autoignition temperature: 343 C







Stability face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">



Stable, but polymerizes gradually upon exposure to air. Combustible.
Incompatible with strong oxidizing agents. Reacts violently with
chlorine. Material such as rags impregnated with linseed oil may
spontaneously combust after a long induction period due to gradual
exothermic reaction with oxygen.





Toxicology face="Times New Roman" size="+1" color="#000000">



Skin irritant. May be allergenic.



Irritation
data


(The meaning of any abbreviations which appear in this section is
given

here.
)

SKN-HMN 300 mg/3d-I mod.







Transport
information
color="#000000">



Non-hazardous for air, sea and road freight.



Personal
protection
color="#000000">



Gloves. Adequate ventilation.



[Return
to

Physical & Theoretical Chemistry Lab. Safety home
page.]


------------------------------------------------------------------------


This
information was last updated on September 3, 2003. We have tried to
make it as accurate and useful as possible, but can take no
responsibility for its use, misuse, or accuracy.





--------------010303020201010501040000--
From dwilley+@pitt.edu Wed Sep 24 10:28:54 2003
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 13:09:46 -0400
From: David Willey
Subject: Re: For the Chemists on the list: [Fwd: Endothermic]
In-reply-to:
To: Richard Berg
Cc: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
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Very interesting, how long is "a very short time"? What type of rag? I'd
like to do this as a demo,
cheers and thank you,
David

Richard Berg wrote:

>I am not a chemist, but isn't this what happens if you leave a rag
>saturated with linseed oil in a confined place? I use linseed oil on my
>outdoor lawn furniture, and noticed the warnings about not leaving cloths,
>brushes, etc. soaked with linseed oil around because of the danger of
>spontaneous combustion. I have read some of the warning stuff that comes
>with virtually every chemical (including water!), so I really didn't
>believe that stuff, UNTIL I TRIED IT. Truly frightening. A linseed oil
>soaked rag in a bag actually bursts into flame in a very short time.
>
>Dick Berg
>
>On Tue, 23 Sep 2003, Machele Cable wrote:
>
>
>
>>My uncle works in fire safety and has run across someone INSISTING that
>>an endothermic reaction could, technically, start a fire. I'm not seeing
>>it, nor is he. Are we just uninformed???? We think, by definition,
>>endothermic reactions cannot start fires since fire needs heat to be
>>added in order to go.
>>
>>Chele
>>
>>-------- Original Message --------
>>Subject: Endothermic
>>Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2003 19:52:34 EDT
>>From: TimPridemore@aol.com
>>To: cablem@wfu.edu
>>
>>
>>
>>Hey,
>>
>>Have you ever heard of, or can you envision, an endothermic reaction
>>that can start a fire???? The only way I can see that is if one of the
>>reactants is combustible. Any thoughts on this???
>>
>>
>>Tim
>>
>>--
>>~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
>> Machele Cable Lab Manager Physics WFU
>> Phone: (336) 758-5532 Fax: (336) 758-6142
>>~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
>> Friends are the Bacon Bits in the salad bowl of life.
>>~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
>> There's a thin woman inside of me trying to get out,
>> but I can usually shut her up with some chocolate!
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>***********************************************************************
>Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
>Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
>U.S. mail address:
>Department of Physics
>University of Maryland
>College Park, MD 20742-4111
>Phone: (301) 405-5994
>FAX: (301) 314-9525
>e-mail reberg@physics.umd.edu
>www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
>***********************************************************************
>
>
>
From reberg@physics.umd.edu Wed Sep 24 10:31:07 2003
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Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 13:14:15 -0400 (EDT)
From: Richard Berg
To: David Willey
cc: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: Re: For the Chemists on the list: [Fwd: Endothermic]
In-Reply-To: <3F71CFDA.3090106@pitt.edu>
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I don't remember how long it took, but it sure shocked me. I try hard now
not to repeat this experiment.

Dick Berg

On Wed, 24 Sep 2003, David Willey wrote:

> Very interesting, how long is "a very short time"? What type of rag? I'd
> like to do this as a demo,
> cheers and thank you,
> David
>
> Richard Berg wrote:
>
> >I am not a chemist, but isn't this what happens if you leave a rag
> >saturated with linseed oil in a confined place? I use linseed oil on my
> >outdoor lawn furniture, and noticed the warnings about not leaving cloths,
> >brushes, etc. soaked with linseed oil around because of the danger of
> >spontaneous combustion. I have read some of the warning stuff that comes
> >with virtually every chemical (including water!), so I really didn't
> >believe that stuff, UNTIL I TRIED IT. Truly frightening. A linseed oil
> >soaked rag in a bag actually bursts into flame in a very short time.
> >
> >Dick Berg
> >
> >On Tue, 23 Sep 2003, Machele Cable wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> >>My uncle works in fire safety and has run across someone INSISTING that
> >>an endothermic reaction could, technically, start a fire. I'm not seeing
> >>it, nor is he. Are we just uninformed???? We think, by definition,
> >>endothermic reactions cannot start fires since fire needs heat to be
> >>added in order to go.
> >>
> >>Chele
> >>
> >>-------- Original Message --------
> >>Subject: Endothermic
> >>Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2003 19:52:34 EDT
> >>From: TimPridemore@aol.com
> >>To: cablem@wfu.edu
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>Hey,
> >>
> >>Have you ever heard of, or can you envision, an endothermic reaction
> >>that can start a fire???? The only way I can see that is if one of the
> >>reactants is combustible. Any thoughts on this???
> >>
> >>
> >>Tim
> >>
> >>--
> >>~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
> >> Machele Cable Lab Manager Physics WFU
> >> Phone: (336) 758-5532 Fax: (336) 758-6142
> >>~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
> >> Friends are the Bacon Bits in the salad bowl of life.
> >>~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
> >> There's a thin woman inside of me trying to get out,
> >> but I can usually shut her up with some chocolate!
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >***********************************************************************
> >Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
> >Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
> >U.S. mail address:
> >Department of Physics
> >University of Maryland
> >College Park, MD 20742-4111
> >Phone: (301) 405-5994
> >FAX: (301) 314-9525
> >e-mail reberg@physics.umd.edu
> >www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
> >***********************************************************************
> >
> >
> >
>
>

***********************************************************************
Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
U.S. mail address:
Department of Physics
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-4111
Phone: (301) 405-5994
FAX: (301) 314-9525
e-mail reberg@physics.umd.edu
www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
***********************************************************************
From reberg@physics.umd.edu Wed Sep 24 10:38:40 2003
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Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 13:22:01 -0400 (EDT)
From: Richard Berg
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: Re: For the Chemists on the list: [Fwd: Endothermic]
In-Reply-To: <3F71CFDA.3090106@pitt.edu>
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If you want an ENDOthermic reaction try

http://www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem/services/demos/demosi5/i5-41.htm

When you mix barium hydroxide and ammonium thyocyanate, both powders
initially at room temperature, it becomes water with some solvents and its
temperature drops to below freezing. I think this can be explained by
entropy.

Sorry about the mixup between ENDOthermic and EXOthermic, but I guess it
started a good discussion. I actually know the difference, but I should
have engaged my brain before opening my mouth (or activating my keyboard).

Dick Berg

***********************************************************************
Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
U.S. mail address:
Department of Physics
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-4111
Phone: (301) 405-5994
FAX: (301) 314-9525
e-mail reberg@physics.umd.edu
www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
***********************************************************************
From tmkramer@piper.hamline.edu Wed Sep 24 10:50:22 2003
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