Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 10:29:11 -0400

Author: pschran1@swarthmore.edu

Subject: linseed oil (was exothermic/endothermic)

Post:

OK, now you've sparked my interest! Why does
linseed oil GENERATE heat as it dries? This
can't be simple evaporation going on here.....

Gotta love these meandering topics...

Prue

>Linseed oil soaked materials may spontaneously
>ignite. Linseed Oil generates heat as it dries
>(an EXOTHERMIC reaction). This heat generated as
>it dries can cause spontaneous ignition of
>materials contacted by Linseed Oil. Oily rags or
>waste and other oily materials can cause
>spontaneous combustion fires if not handled
>properly. Immediately after use, and before
>disposal or storage, you MUST (1) spread out all
>oily materials outside to dry by flattening them
>out to their full size in an any spot for 24
>hours at temperatures above 40 F.
>Fred
>
>Dr. Fredrick M. Stein
>Director of Education and Outreach
>American Physical Society
>One Physics Ellipse
>College Park, MD 20740-3844
>(301) 209-3263
>(301) 209-0865 fax
>stein@aps.org
>http://www.aps.org/educ/
>
>>>> reberg@physics.umd.edu 09/24/03 09:35AM >>>
>I am not a chemist, but isn't this what happens if you leave a rag
>saturated with linseed oil in a confined place? I use linseed oil on my
>outdoor lawn furniture, and noticed the warnings about not leaving cloths,
>brushes, etc. soaked with linseed oil around because of the danger of
>spontaneous combustion. I have read some of the warning stuff that comes
>with virtually every chemical (including water!), so I really didn't
>believe that stuff, UNTIL I TRIED IT. Truly frightening. A linseed oil
>soaked rag in a bag actually bursts into flame in a very short time.
>
>Dick Berg
>

--



***********************************
Prue Schran, Lecturer
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Swarthmore College
Swarthmore, PA 19081-1390
pschran1@swarthmore.edu
(610)690-6886 office
(610)328-7895 fax
***********************************

"The number you have dialed is
imaginary. Rotate phone 90 degrees
and try again."
From reberg@physics.umd.edu Wed Sep 24 07:49:14 2003
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Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 10:32:35 -0400 (EDT)
From: Richard Berg
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: Re: For the Chemists on the list: [Fwd: Endothermic]
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True!

Dick Berg

On Wed, 24 Sep 2003, Nord wrote:

> Wouldn't that be an exo-thermic reaction?
>
> Paul
>
> On Wed, 24 Sep 2003, Richard Berg wrote:
>
> > Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 09:35:31 -0400 (EDT)
> > From: Richard Berg
> > Reply-To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
> > To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
> > Subject: Re: For the Chemists on the list: [Fwd: Endothermic]
> >
> > I am not a chemist, but isn't this what happens if you leave a rag
> > saturated with linseed oil in a confined place? I use linseed oil on my
> > outdoor lawn furniture, and noticed the warnings about not leaving cloths,
> > brushes, etc. soaked with linseed oil around because of the danger of
> > spontaneous combustion. I have read some of the warning stuff that comes
> > with virtually every chemical (including water!), so I really didn't
> > believe that stuff, UNTIL I TRIED IT. Truly frightening. A linseed oil
> > soaked rag in a bag actually bursts into flame in a very short time.
> >
> > Dick Berg
> >
> > On Tue, 23 Sep 2003, Machele Cable wrote:
> >
> > > My uncle works in fire safety and has run across someone INSISTING that
> > > an endothermic reaction could, technically, start a fire. I'm not seeing
> > > it, nor is he. Are we just uninformed???? We think, by definition,
> > > endothermic reactions cannot start fires since fire needs heat to be
> > > added in order to go.
> > >
> > > Chele
> > >
> > > -------- Original Message --------
> > > Subject: Endothermic
> > > Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2003 19:52:34 EDT
> > > From: TimPridemore@aol.com
> > > To: cablem@wfu.edu
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Hey,
> > >
> > > Have you ever heard of, or can you envision, an endothermic reaction
> > > that can start a fire???? The only way I can see that is if one of the
> > > reactants is combustible. Any thoughts on this???
> > >
> > >
> > > Tim
> > >
> > > --
> > > ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
> > > Machele Cable Lab Manager Physics WFU
> > > Phone: (336) 758-5532 Fax: (336) 758-6142
> > > ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
> > > Friends are the Bacon Bits in the salad bowl of life.
> > > ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
> > > There's a thin woman inside of me trying to get out,
> > > but I can usually shut her up with some chocolate!
> > >
> > >
> >
> > ***********************************************************************
> > Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
> > Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
> > U.S. mail address:
> > Department of Physics
> > University of Maryland
> > College Park, MD 20742-4111
> > Phone: (301) 405-5994
> > FAX: (301) 314-9525
> > e-mail reberg@physics.umd.edu
> > www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
> > ***********************************************************************
> >
> >
>
>

***********************************************************************
Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
U.S. mail address:
Department of Physics
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-4111
Phone: (301) 405-5994
FAX: (301) 314-9525
e-mail reberg@physics.umd.edu
www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
***********************************************************************
From fizzix@netmcr.com Wed Sep 24 07:50:56 2003
Message-ID: <3F71AB6C.6030808@netmcr.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 10:34:20 -0400
From: Gordon Shepherd
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Subject: Re: For the Chemists on the list: [Fwd: Endothermic]
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I believe an exothermic reaction gives off energy and would be self
sustaining (like the linseed oil rags) and a net emission of energy, but
an endothermic reaction would require energy to be supplied from an
outside source to sustain it and would have a net absorption of energy.
Gordon Shepherd

Machele Cable wrote:

> My uncle works in fire safety and has run across someone INSISTING
> that an endothermic reaction could, technically, start a fire. I'm not
> seeing it, nor is he. Are we just uninformed???? We think, by
> definition, endothermic reactions cannot start fires since fire needs
> heat to be added in order to go.
>
> Chele
>
> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: Endothermic
> Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2003 19:52:34 EDT
> From: TimPridemore@aol.com
> To: cablem@wfu.edu
>
>
>
> Hey,
>
> Have you ever heard of, or can you envision, an endothermic reaction
> that can start a fire???? The only way I can see that is if one of
> the reactants is combustible. Any thoughts on this???
>
>
> Tim
>
From stein@aps.org Wed Sep 24 08:48:33 2003

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