Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2003 10:18:30 -0400

Author: "Fred Stein"

Subject: Re: For the Chemists on the list: [Fwd: Endothermic]

Post:

Linseed oil soaked materials may spontaneously ignite. Linseed Oil generates heat as it dries (an EXOTHERMIC reaction). This heat generated as it dries can cause spontaneous ignition of materials contacted by Linseed Oil. Oily rags or waste and other oily materials can cause spontaneous combustion fires if not handled properly. Immediately after use, and before disposal or storage, you MUST (1) spread out all oily materials outside to dry by flattening them out to their full size in an any spot for 24 hours at temperatures above 40 F.
Fred

Dr. Fredrick M. Stein
Director of Education and Outreach
American Physical Society
One Physics Ellipse
College Park, MD 20740-3844
(301) 209-3263
(301) 209-0865 fax
stein@aps.org
http://www.aps.org/educ/

>>> reberg@physics.umd.edu 09/24/03 09:35AM >>>
I am not a chemist, but isn't this what happens if you leave a rag
saturated with linseed oil in a confined place? I use linseed oil on my
outdoor lawn furniture, and noticed the warnings about not leaving cloths,
brushes, etc. soaked with linseed oil around because of the danger of
spontaneous combustion. I have read some of the warning stuff that comes
with virtually every chemical (including water!), so I really didn't
believe that stuff, UNTIL I TRIED IT. Truly frightening. A linseed oil
soaked rag in a bag actually bursts into flame in a very short time.

Dick Berg

On Tue, 23 Sep 2003, Machele Cable wrote:

> My uncle works in fire safety and has run across someone INSISTING that
> an endothermic reaction could, technically, start a fire. I'm not seeing
> it, nor is he. Are we just uninformed???? We think, by definition,
> endothermic reactions cannot start fires since fire needs heat to be
> added in order to go.
>
> Chele
>
> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: Endothermic
> Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2003 19:52:34 EDT
> From: TimPridemore@aol.com
> To: cablem@wfu.edu
>
>
>
> Hey,
>
> Have you ever heard of, or can you envision, an endothermic reaction
> that can start a fire???? The only way I can see that is if one of the
> reactants is combustible. Any thoughts on this???
>
>
> Tim
>
> --
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> Machele Cable Lab Manager Physics WFU
> Phone: (336) 758-5532 Fax: (336) 758-6142
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> There's a thin woman inside of me trying to get out,
> but I can usually shut her up with some chocolate!
>
>

***********************************************************************
Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice
Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
U.S. mail address:
Department of Physics
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-4111
Phone: (301) 405-5994
FAX: (301) 314-9525
e-mail reberg@physics.umd.edu
www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
***********************************************************************



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