Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 13:26:52 -0600

Author: Jerry DiMarco

Subject: RE: Sliding into first base

Post:

At 11:02 AM 8/28/2003, you wrote:
>Greetings,
>I think there is another reason to dive for the ball. When you dive for
>the ball, you have more time to arrive at the ball compared if you ran
>and caught it at a higher level. Thus the best way to catch is
>determined by being able to get to the ball. If I can get to it running
>without diving, then I will run. If not I will dive hoping this
>additional time will get me to it.

The situation you describe is not a real world situation. You
generally do not have 2 chances to catch a ball as it goes by you. If you
consider that the flyball started out at home plate and the outfielder
starts out in the middle of the outfield, the ball routinely beats the
outfielder to the fence when it is hit that far. That means the ball is
traveling considerably faster than the outfielder in that situation. So if
you miss your first chance to catch the ball, you will not be able to
outrun it to get a second chance...

>To me, I would look at the force vector of the ground acting on the foot
>to propel one along. When we run the sum of the forces on the runner is
>zero (assuming that one is running at constant speed).
>How does the horizontal component vary from this when one alters the
>force to dive for the base?

In a dive, the body is leaning more forward the last step or
two. While the horizontal force is greater as a result, your traction is
reduced because of the extreme angle. There may be anatomical factors that
come into play here as well. But the net result is probably a slight
reduction in speed, otherwise sprinters would run at that angle all the time...

>How does the air resistance vary as one changes position?

I don't think this is enough of a factor to consider...


>...You are forgetting the softball/baseball basics
>while analyzing to death the physics of it.

I don't think any individual is guilty of analyzing this to
death. Instead, most analyses are over simplified, ignoring some of the
real world subtleties of the motion. To understand what's going on, you
have to have observed it or experienced it. Experience, after all, is just
observation in a different form...

>1) You slide into a base to avoid a tag out. Sliding makes it more
>difficult for the infielder player to tag you. He/she has to catch the ball
>and then quickly tag you without losing the ball during the impact of the
>tag. This is not an easy task when you have somebody sliding at your feet
>at high speed with the intend of breaking your concentration and the play.
>2) You don't slide into first base because the first baseman (or
>"baselady")does not have to tag you to complete the out (just catch the ball
>while stepping on the base). You can overrun the base at full speed (that's
>how you get there faster, less friction) and quickly and safely step out of
>the infield to avoid a tag.

Friction is not a factor in a properly done head first slide. You
time your dive so you touch the bag with your hands when you hit the
dirt. Since the difference in one's running speed (when sliding head first
versus running through) is minimal, the main factor that determines which
technique gets you there first is the difference between the reach of your
outstretched legs (~5' for me) versus the reach of your outstretched body
(~7.5' for me). The difference, in my case 2.5', is more than enough to
make up for the slight loss in running speed...

>3) Sliding into a base actually helps you break the speed so that you don't
>overrun the base and get tagged out.
>4) In a double play situation, the sliding player at second base tries to
>break the play by breaking the concentration (and possibly the legs) of the
>second baseman. The second baseman does not have to tag the sliding player
>so his task is to catch the ball while touching the base and then quickly
>jump out the sliding player's way while throwing the ball to first base.
>5) The proper way of sliding into second and third base is feet first, with
>one leg extended and the other one slightly "curled" and tucked underneath,
>so that upon reaching the base with the extended leg, your momentum and the
>curled leg allow you to spring right back up and continue running to the
>next base if necessary.
>Sliding head first is only necessary when rounding the bases at full speed
>carries your momentum so far away from the target base that you must reach
>for it. Otherwise, it is plain stupid, regardless of "intimidating" effect
>(don't care what Pete Rose says). It does not provide additional breaking,
>you can not spring back up easily, and you risk severe head injury.

Pete Rose was certainly one of the more ardent practioners of the
head first slide, but he didn't do it for additional braking. He did it
because it gets you to the base sooner. It's true you can't spring up and
you risk injury, but it's not "stupid", because it does work. I can
appreciate someone who likes to go for it. So do coaches. And as I said
before, the experienced athlete eventually learns the best way of doing
things...

Jerry


<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

Jerry DiMarco
Manager of Lecture Demonstrations and Instructional Labs
Montana State Univ., Physics Dept.
Bozeman, MT

Our Motto: "There's a demo in there somewhere."
From cablem@wfu.edu Tue Sep 2 15:57:48 2003
Message-ID: <3F54F6D3.2050800@wfu.edu>
Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 16:00:19 -0400
From: Machele Cable
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Subject: Feynman Video Hunt
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We have a faculty member who is hunting down videos of Feynman. In
particular, he'd like to recreate the collection of videos done by the
BBC (?) of the Cornell lectures in the 1950's or 60s. David was talking
to the people who keep up with the videos of Nobel Prize Winners and the
Feynman Cornel collection was dispersed some years ago. If anyone
happens to have one or two (or the collection????) on their shelves, or
know where they might be, please contact

David Carroll at carroldl@wfu.edu

Thanks!

Chele

--
~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
Machele Cable Lab Manager Physics WFU
Phone: (336) 758-5532 Fax: (336) 758-6142
~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
Friends are the Bacon Bits in the salad bowl of life.
~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
There's a thin woman inside of me trying to get out,
but I can usually shut her up with some chocolate!

From SRyan@indians.k12.pa.us Tue Sep 2 16:06:29 2003
Message-ID:
From: "Ryan, Samantha"
To: "'TAP-L '"
Subject: RE: LabPro and Calculator Loss Prevention help
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 16:08:54 -0400
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I've seen (and plan on doing soon to my equip) calculators "tagged" with
bright orange spraypaint - on the backs, of course, with some overspray to
the sides so it is visible regardless of how the calculator lays. If it
does get misplaced it is OBVIOUS where it is supposed to be.

Don't see why that wouldn't work with CBL's and cables too... not to mention
making them easier to spot, harder to forget to put away.

That and make the technicians who are supposed to check them in financially
responsible for missing parts??

=)
Samantha

-----Original Message-----
From: Patricia Sievert
To: TAP-L
Sent: 9/2/03 11:38 AM
Subject: LabPro and Calculator Loss Prevention help

Any of you have a good system for keeping track of these LabPros or CBLs

and calculators? We just started using them in our introductory (both
algebra based and calc based) labs and pieces are flying away. We have
used them in our physics for non scientists for 2+ years without
incident by collecting drivers licenses from students. This worked well

for a few reasons, one of which is that there is only one pair of TAs
for that class and so they feel more directly responsible for the whole
set of items. Those TAs have the entire set of CBL-2s and TI89s and all

of the probes under their care for the semester with a locked closet to
keep them in.
Now with our larger acquisition of LabPros and TI83+s and lots more
probes, they have been locked up in the electronic technician's office
and the TAs (about 16 TAs) are to check out just what is needed for each

lab. the LabPros are kept in their packing boxes with all of the cables

(including ones we don't yet use for the computers) and disassembled
from the calculators. So far this has been a disaster. The technicians

have not checked boxes as they come back, people have been leaving them
in the Physics office after hours, pieces are already missing when the
TAs check them out in the morning for use in their labs.


Any suggestions from some more experienced users?

Pati

--
Patricia Sievert
Physics Outreach Coordinator
219 Faraday Hall
Physics Department
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, IL 60115
sievert@physics.niu.edu
(815) 753-6418
From SRyan@indians.k12.pa.us Tue Sep 2 16:10:49 2003
Message-ID:
From: "Ryan, Samantha"
To: "'tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu '"
Subject: RE: laser-blasted glass cubes
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 16:13:18 -0400
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That webpage is pricey! I saw similar at a gasstation in MT this summer
for around $15-20. If I'd have been thinking about my students I might have
picked one up at the time. Instead I was thinking about MooseTracks Ice
Cream. =)

SMR

-----Original Message-----
From: William Beaty
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Sent: 7/1/03 2:09 AM
Subject: laser-blasted glass cubes


Here's something weird. Using an infrared pulse-laser to "scribe"
little
white spots on the inside of a transparent block.

http://www.npionline.com/products/thumbnails/tn003000.html
http://www.lasermaxmed.com.tw/3d-e.htm
http://65.108.81.194/products/pr003002.444.html


(((((((((((((((((( ( ( ( ( (O) ) ) ) ) )))))))))))))))))))
William J. Beaty SCIENCE HOBBYIST website
billb@eskimo.com http://amasci.com
EE/programmer/sci-exhibits amateur science, hobby projects, sci fair
Seattle, WA 206-789-0775 unusual phenomena, tesla coils, weird sci
From mocko@phys.ufl.edu Tue Sep 2 16:13:10 2003
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Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 16:15:36 -0400 (EDT)
From: John Mocko
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: Re: Feynman Video Hunt
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Hello Machele,

I've got 16mm films but not videotape versions of the Feynman lectures. I
contacted David directly but thought I'd post it to tap-l as well. The
16mm films are still in pretty good condition.

John Mocko
University of Florida
Lecture Demo






On Tue, 2 Sep 2003, Machele Cable wrote:

> We have a faculty member who is hunting down videos of Feynman. In
> particular, he'd like to recreate the collection of videos done by the
> BBC (?) of the Cornell lectures in the 1950's or 60s. David was talking
> to the people who keep up with the videos of Nobel Prize Winners and the
> Feynman Cornel collection was dispersed some years ago. If anyone
> happens to have one or two (or the collection????) on their shelves, or
> know where they might be, please contact
>
> David Carroll at carroldl@wfu.edu
>
> Thanks!
>
> Chele
>
> --
> ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
> Machele Cable Lab Manager Physics WFU
> Phone: (336) 758-5532 Fax: (336) 758-6142
> ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
> Friends are the Bacon Bits in the salad bowl of life.
> ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
> There's a thin woman inside of me trying to get out,
> but I can usually shut her up with some chocolate!
>
>

______________________________________________________________________

John Mocko
Senior Teaching Laboratory Specialist (Lecture Demonstrations)
Department of Physics
University of Florida
Gainesville, Fl.
From cablem@wfu.edu Tue Sep 2 17:03:33 2003
Message-ID: <3F55063B.3030105@wfu.edu>
Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2003 17:06:03 -0400
From: Machele Cable
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He's looking for the ones at Cornell. Are your films of these lectures?
That'd be fantastic!

Chele

John Mocko wrote:

>Hello Machele,
>
>I've got 16mm films but not videotape versions of the Feynman lectures. I
>contacted David directly but thought I'd post it to tap-l as well. The
>16mm films are still in pretty good condition.
>
>John Mocko
>University of Florida
>Lecture Demo
>
>
>
>
>
>
>On Tue, 2 Sep 2003, Machele Cable wrote:
>
>
>
>>We have a faculty member who is hunting down videos of Feynman. In
>>particular, he'd like to recreate the collection of videos done by the
>>BBC (?) of the Cornell lectures in the 1950's or 60s. David was talking
>>to the people who keep up with the videos of Nobel Prize Winners and the
>>Feynman Cornel collection was dispersed some years ago. If anyone
>>happens to have one or two (or the collection????) on their shelves, or
>>know where they might be, please contact
>>
>>David Carroll at carroldl@wfu.edu
>>
>>Thanks!
>>
>>Chele
>>
>>--
>>~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
>> Machele Cable Lab Manager Physics WFU
>> Phone: (336) 758-5532 Fax: (336) 758-6142
>>~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
>> Friends are the Bacon Bits in the salad bowl of life.
>>~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
>> There's a thin woman inside of me trying to get out,
>> but I can usually shut her up with some chocolate!
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>______________________________________________________________________
>
>John Mocko
>Senior Teaching Laboratory Specialist (Lecture Demonstrations)
>Department of Physics
>University of Florida
>Gainesville, Fl.
>
>
>
>
>

--
~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
Machele Cable Lab Manager Physics WFU
Phone: (336) 758-5532 Fax: (336) 758-6142
~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
Friends are the Bacon Bits in the salad bowl of life.
~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
There's a thin woman inside of me trying to get out,
but I can usually shut her up with some chocolate!

From rtorres@umich.edu Tue Sep 2 17:10:56 2003
From: "=?us-ascii?Q?Ramon_O._Torres-Isea?="
To:
Subject: RE: Sliding into first base
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 16:13:27 -0500
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Hello Jerry,

As I said...we should play some softball or baseball at the next AAPT summer
meeting...maybe we can even do some "sliding into base" experiments!

In the mean time we can talk to some baseball coaches to see how far off I
was in my remarks. Maybe they can even suggest some experiments.

Cheer!

Ramon
---
Adjunct Lecturer and Supervisor,
Advanced Physics Laboratories.
Department of Physics,
The University of Michigan
at Ann Arbor, MI.

E-mail: rtorres@umich,edu
Phone: 734-764-3443


-----Original Message-----
From: owner-tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
[mailto:owner-tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu]On Behalf Of Jerry DiMarco
Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2003 2:27 PM
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: RE: Sliding into first base


At 11:02 AM 8/28/2003, you wrote:
>Greetings,
>I think there is another reason to dive for the ball. When you dive for
>the ball, you have more time to arrive at the ball compared if you ran
>and caught it at a higher level. Thus the best way to catch is
>determined by being able to get to the ball. If I can get to it running
>without diving, then I will run. If not I will dive hoping this
>additional time will get me to it.

The situation you describe is not a real world situation. You
generally do not have 2 chances to catch a ball as it goes by you. If you
consider that the flyball started out at home plate and the outfielder
starts out in the middle of the outfield, the ball routinely beats the
outfielder to the fence when it is hit that far. That means the ball is
traveling considerably faster than the outfielder in that situation. So if
you miss your first chance to catch the ball, you will not be able to
outrun it to get a second chance...

>To me, I would look at the force vector of the ground acting on the foot
>to propel one along. When we run the sum of the forces on the runner is
>zero (assuming that one is running at constant speed).
>How does the horizontal component vary from this when one alters the
>force to dive for the base?

In a dive, the body is leaning more forward the last step or
two. While the horizontal force is greater as a result, your traction is
reduced because of the extreme angle. There may be anatomical factors that
come into play here as well. But the net result is probably a slight
reduction in speed, otherwise sprinters would run at that angle all the
time...

>How does the air resistance vary as one changes position?

I don't think this is enough of a factor to consider...


>...You are forgetting the softball/baseball basics
>while analyzing to death the physics of it.

I don't think any individual is guilty of analyzing this to
death. Instead, most analyses are over simplified, ignoring some of the
real world subtleties of the motion. To understand what's going on, you
have to have observed it or experienced it. Experience, after all, is just
observation in a different form...

>1) You slide into a base to avoid a tag out. Sliding makes it more
>difficult for the infielder player to tag you. He/she has to catch the
ball
>and then quickly tag you without losing the ball during the impact of the
>tag. This is not an easy task when you have somebody sliding at your feet
>at high speed with the intend of breaking your concentration and the play.
>2) You don't slide into first base because the first baseman (or
>"baselady")does not have to tag you to complete the out (just catch the
ball
>while stepping on the base). You can overrun the base at full speed
(that's
>how you get there faster, less friction) and quickly and safely step out of
>the infield to avoid a tag.

Friction is not a factor in a properly done head first slide. You
time your dive so you touch the bag with your hands when you hit the
dirt. Since the difference in one's running speed (when sliding head first
versus running through) is minimal, the main factor that determines which
technique gets you there first is the difference between the reach of your
outstretched legs (~5' for me) versus the reach of your outstretched body
(~7.5' for me). The difference, in my case 2.5', is more than enough to
make up for the slight loss in running speed...

>3) Sliding into a base actually helps you break the speed so that you don't
>overrun the base and get tagged out.
>4) In a double play situation, the sliding player at second base tries to
>break the play by breaking the concentration (and possibly the legs) of the
>second baseman. The second baseman does not have to tag the sliding player
>so his task is to catch the ball while touching the base and then quickly
>jump out the sliding player's way while throwing the ball to first base.
>5) The proper way of sliding into second and third base is feet first, with
>one leg extended and the other one slightly "curled" and tucked underneath,
>so that upon reaching the base with the extended leg, your momentum and the
>curled leg allow you to spring right back up and continue running to the
>next base if necessary.
>Sliding head first is only necessary when rounding the bases at full speed
>carries your momentum so far away from the target base that you must reach
>for it. Otherwise, it is plain stupid, regardless of "intimidating" effect
>(don't care what Pete Rose says). It does not provide additional breaking,
>you can not spring back up easily, and you risk severe head injury.

Pete Rose was certainly one of the more ardent practioners of the
head first slide, but he didn't do it for additional braking. He did it
because it gets you to the base sooner. It's true you can't spring up and
you risk injury, but it's not "stupid", because it does work. I can
appreciate someone who likes to go for it. So do coaches. And as I said
before, the experienced athlete eventually learns the best way of doing
things...


Jerry


<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

Jerry DiMarco
Manager of Lecture Demonstrations and Instructional Labs
Montana State Univ., Physics Dept.
Bozeman, MT

Our Motto: "There's a demo in there somewhere."

From dimarco@physics.montana.edu Tue Sep 2 17:34:24 2003

Back