Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 08:32:03 -0600

Author: Jerry DiMarco

Subject: Re: Silica Sand Safety

Post:

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A group in a summer workshop did this activity using a box with a
deep layer of flour topped by a thin layer of cocoa powder. The
contrasting powders make it easy to see the debris patterns, which
replicate the debris patterns seen on the moon and other bodies...

Jerry


At 10:41 AM 9/9/2003, you wrote:
>Hello Tap'l-ers,
>
>I have a safety question for you. In the past we have performed a
>cratering formation lab by dropping metal balls into a box of sand. The
>sand that we have found to produce the best results was silica sand. On
>acquiring another 100lb bag of the stuff, I found a rather large warning
>label about possible health problems caused by the sand. Does anyone else
>use silica sand or have any information on the dangers of using it in a
>two hour lab? Also, does anyone else perform cratering labs with a
>different material?
>
>Thanks for all your valued help. -Andy.
>
>******************************************
>Andy Smith
>Lab Supervisor/ Part-time Instructor
>DePauw University Physics
>Greencastle, IN
>******************************************


<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

Jerry DiMarco
Manager of Lecture Demonstrations and Instructional Labs
Montana State Univ., Physics
Dept.
Bozeman, MT

Our Motto: "There's a demo in there somewhere."
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     A group in a summer workshop did this activity
using a box with a deep layer of flour topped by a thin layer of cocoa
powder.  The contrasting powders make it easy to see the debris
patterns, which replicate the debris patterns seen on the moon and other
bodies...


                                                                Jerry




At 10:41 AM 9/9/2003, you wrote:

Hello
Tap'l-ers,


 

I have a safety question for you.  In the
past we have performed a cratering formation lab by dropping metal balls
into a box of sand.  The sand that we have found to produce the best
results was silica sand.  On acquiring another 100lb bag of the
stuff, I found a rather large warning label about possible health
problems caused by the sand.  Does anyone else use silica sand or
have any information on the dangers of using it in a two hour lab? 
Also, does anyone else perform cratering labs with a different
material?


 

Thanks for all your valued help.
-Andy.


 

******************************************

Andy Smith

Lab Supervisor/ Part-time Instructor

DePauw University Physics

Greencastle, IN

******************************************





<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

                                                                        

 Jerry DiMarco

 Manager of Lecture Demonstrations and Instructional
Labs

 Montana State Univ., Physics
Dept.                                             

 Bozeman, MT



Our Motto: "There's a demo in there somewhere."


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From gaulf@astro.westmoreland.cc.pa.us Wed Sep 10 10:35:18 2003
User-Agent: Microsoft-Outlook-Express-Macintosh-Edition/5.02.2022
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 10:37:53 -0400
Subject: Heating Mantle safety
From: Frank Gaul
To:
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Hello
I have a question about heating mantles used in our organic laboratory.
They are expensive and I try to keep them in good shape .
However they are also made of glass cloth which has a large surface area.
Any caustic material that gets on them will quickly eat the glass causing
the exposure of the heating wires.
What is a remedy for this .
Using aluminum foil was something that we once did to contain the sand in
the mantle but of course it is conductive.
I have purchased extra cloth to place in the mantles when the original
material is destroyed.
The solution of patching with glass cloth is what I do now and it works but
I do not like the idea that the original mantle is harmed so easily.
Please write back if you are familiar with this problem or know of any
reports of people being shocked by heating mantles.
Any suggestions will be welcome.
Thank you,
Frank
From peacock@physics.utah.edu Wed Sep 10 10:55:11 2003
Message-ID: <3F5F3CCC.51727790@physics.utah.edu>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 09:01:32 -0600
From: "Zigmund J. Peacock"
Organization: University of Utah , Department of Physics
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Subject: Re: Heating Mantle safety
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Frank, it sounds like you need to talk to the Chem people.
They have a bulletin board similar to us. I think it is Chem-L or something
like it. Anyone out there know for sure?
Zig

Frank Gaul wrote:

> Hello
> I have a question about heating mantles used in our organic laboratory.
> They are expensive and I try to keep them in good shape .
> However they are also made of glass cloth which has a large surface area.
> Any caustic material that gets on them will quickly eat the glass causing
> the exposure of the heating wires.
> What is a remedy for this .
> Using aluminum foil was something that we once did to contain the sand in
> the mantle but of course it is conductive.
> I have purchased extra cloth to place in the mantles when the original
> material is destroyed.
> The solution of patching with glass cloth is what I do now and it works but
> I do not like the idea that the original mantle is harmed so easily.
> Please write back if you are familiar with this problem or know of any
> reports of people being shocked by heating mantles.
> Any suggestions will be welcome.
> Thank you,
> Frank

--
Zigmund J. Peacock WWW.physics.utah.edu/people/staff/peacock.html
University of Utah/Physics peacock@physics.utah.edu
115 SOUTH 1400 EAST #201 Tel 801 581 6602
SALT LAKE CITY UT 84112-0830 Fax 801 581 4801

"We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in
the night to do violence to those who would do us harm"
-- George Orwell

"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good
men do nothing!"
-- Edmund Burke

From dimarco@physics.montana.edu Wed Sep 10 11:18:52 2003

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