Date: Tue, 09 Sep 2003 13:18:44 -0400

Author: Gerald Zani

Subject: Re: Silica Sand Safety

Post:

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i use washed sea sand from VWR. i lightly sprinkle the top layer with
chocolate powder or coconut charcoal. jerry

At 10:41 AM 9/9/2003 -0500, you wrote:
>Hello Tap'l-ers,
>
>I have a safety question for you. In the past we have performed a
>cratering formation lab by dropping metal balls into a box of sand. The
>sand that we have found to produce the best results was silica sand. On
>acquiring another 100lb bag of the stuff, I found a rather large warning
>label about possible health problems caused by the sand. Does anyone else
>use silica sand or have any information on the dangers of using it in a
>two hour lab? Also, does anyone else perform cratering labs with a
>different material?
>
>Thanks for all your valued help. -Andy.
>
>******************************************
>Andy Smith
>Lab Supervisor/ Part-time Instructor
>DePauw University Physics
>Greencastle, IN
>******************************************

Gerald Zani e-mail: Gerald_Zani@brown.edu
Manager of Demonstrations phone: (401) 863-3964
Department of Physics FAX: (401) 863-2024
Brown University Providence, RI 02912-1843 USA

URL http://www.physics.brown.edu/users/staff/zani/index.html
URL http://www.physics.brown.edu/Studies/Demo/

Do a little more of that work which you have confessed to be good,
Which you feel that society and your most Just Judge rightly demand of you.
Cultivate the tree which you have found to bear fruit in your soil.
If you have any experiments you would like to try, try them.
Now's your chance.
Henry David Thoreau, Journal entry, 1850.
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i use washed sea sand from VWR.  i lightly sprinkle the top layer
with chocolate powder or coconut charcoal.  jerry


At 10:41 AM 9/9/2003 -0500, you wrote:

Hello
Tap'l-ers,


 

I have a safety question for you.  In the
past we have performed a cratering formation lab by dropping metal balls
into a box of sand.  The sand that we have found to produce the best
results was silica sand.  On acquiring another 100lb bag of the
stuff, I found a rather large warning label about possible health
problems caused by the sand.  Does anyone else use silica sand or
have any information on the dangers of using it in a two hour lab? 
Also, does anyone else perform cratering labs with a different
material?


 

Thanks for all your valued help.
-Andy.


 

******************************************

Andy Smith

Lab Supervisor/ Part-time Instructor

DePauw University Physics

Greencastle, IN

******************************************


Gerald
Zani                     e-mail:
Gerald_Zani@brown.edu

Manager of
Demonstrations       phone:
(401) 863-3964

Department of
Physics           FAX:  
(401) 863-2024

Brown
University                Providence,
RI 02912-1843 USA

 

URL
http://www.physics.brown.edu/users/staff/zani/index.html

URL
http://www.physics.brown.edu/Studies/Demo/

 

Do a little more of that work which you have confessed to be
good,

Which you feel that society and your most Just Judge rightly demand
of you.

Cultivate the tree which you have found to bear fruit in your
soil. 

If you have any experiments you would like to try, try them.

Now's your chance. 

Henry David Thoreau, Journal entry, 1850.


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From dwilley+@pitt.edu Tue Sep 9 13:15:34 2003
Date: Tue, 09 Sep 2003 13:17:49 -0400
From: David Willey
Subject: Linear thermal expansion
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Hi all,
I've been using (or at least, trying to use) the PASCO thermal expansion
apparatus for several terms and have never got consistently good
results. It seems like a simple experiment, with fairly low
uncertainties, a few percent at most, and yet even my best groups will
at times have 10 to 15 percent errors. The same happens when I do it
myself, and I'm pretty sure I'm following the instructions to the
letter. The only things to measure are the sample's original length,
room temperature, the temperature of steam and the increase in the
sample's length, each of which I (erroneously) thought could be measured
easily and accurately. What is the experience of other users? Is there
some "trick" to making this apparatus yield good numbers? I've tried
insulating just the center of the tube, as directed by PASCO, I've tried
insulating the entire tube and I've tried with no insulation, none of
which seems to make much difference. Any help you are able to offer will
be much appreciated,
cheers,
David
From cake@midway.uchicago.edu Tue Sep 9 17:09:42 2003
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