Date: Mon, 08 Sep 2003 10:42:20 -0400

Author: "Warren Hein"

Subject: Re: AAPT Lapel Pin

Post:

I am sure it is still coming. If you don't get one, let me know.

Warren

>>> rwharris@cath-mem.org 09/08/03 09:52AM >>>
I've been a member since about 1968 and get one ;-(
Perhaps they used my $ in a better way.
Br. Robert W. Harris
Catholic Memorial School
www.cmphysics.org
www.catholicmemorial.org

> George M. Caplan wrote:
>
> >Recently, I received a small mailing tube containing an AAPT lapel pin.
> >Did you all receive one too?
> >I wonder what it cost to have the pins made and to mail them out.
> >I also wonder whether the money could have been used in a better way.
> >What do you all think?
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
> --
> Dr. Andrew D. Gavrin
> Department of Physics, 402 N. Blackford St.
> Indiana Univ. Purdue Univ. Indianapolis
> Indianapolis, IN 46202-3273
>
> 317-274-6909 (Ph) -2393 (FAX)
> agavrin@iupui.edu
>
>
>



From rtmq@stn.net Tue Sep 9 04:49:35 2003
From: "Robert T McQuaid"
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2003 08:52:14 -0000
MIME-Version: 1.0
Subject: Capillary
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September 9, 2003

tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu

Subject: Capillary

Tappers:

Today's homeschool experiment was to set two drinking
glasses (we used plastic) side by side, one full of
water, the other empty. Roll up a paper towel and
insert it into both glasses, with the connection above
the rims of both, well above the water line. Within a
few minutes, water appeared at the bottom of the empty
glass, transported through the towel. In a bit over 12
hours, the two water levels were indistinguishable.

That satisfied the student. But I am mystified by one
effect. Within a few hours, bubbles (presumably from
dissolved air) appeared throughout the inside of the
formerly full glass, but none appeared in the receiving
glass. What process inhibits dissolved gases from
passage through a towel?

Robert T McQuaid
Orangeville Ontario Canada
email: rtmq@stn.net

From stjohn@buphy.bu.edu Tue Sep 9 09:41:13 2003
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2003 09:43:56 -0400
From: "Jason St. John"
To:
Subject: Re: Capillary
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Perhaps by moving slowly over the capillary bridge, the water exposes
gigantic surface area to the room, giving dissoved gases a chance to
escape.

____________________________________________________
Jason St. John 617.353.2634 stjohn@bu.edu
Boston University Physics Lecture Demonstrations
590 Commonwealth Ave. Boston, MA 02215

On 2003-09-09.08:52 owner-tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu sent:


September 9, 2003

tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu

Subject: Capillary

Tappers:

Today's homeschool experiment was to set two drinking
glasses (we used plastic) side by side, one full of
water, the other empty. Roll up a paper towel and
insert it into both glasses, with the connection above
the rims of both, well above the water line. Within a
few minutes, water appeared at the bottom of the empty
glass, transported through the towel. In a bit over 12
hours, the two water levels were indistinguishable.

That satisfied the student. But I am mystified by one
effect. Within a few hours, bubbles (presumably from
dissolved air) appeared throughout the inside of the
formerly full glass, but none appeared in the receiving
glass. What process inhibits dissolved gases from
passage through a towel?

Robert T McQuaid
Orangeville Ontario Canada
email: rtmq@stn.net
From asmith@DEPAUW.EDU Tue Sep 9 11:39:13 2003
Date: Tue, 09 Sep 2003 10:41:34 -0500
From: Andy Smith
Subject: Silica Sand Safety
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Message-id: <003201c376e8$d90cf0a0$651378a3@depauw.edu>
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Hello Tap'l-ers,

I have a safety question for you. In the past we have performed a cratering formation lab by dropping metal balls into a box of sand. The sand that we have found to produce the best results was silica sand. On acquiring another 100lb bag of the stuff, I found a rather large warning label about possible health problems caused by the sand. Does anyone else use silica sand or have any information on the dangers of using it in a two hour lab? Also, does anyone else perform cratering labs with a different material?

Thanks for all your valued help. -Andy.

******************************************
Andy Smith
Lab Supervisor/ Part-time Instructor
DePauw University Physics
Greencastle, IN
******************************************

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Hello Tap'l-ers,

 

I have a safety question for you.  In the past
we have performed a cratering formation lab by dropping metal balls into a box
of sand.  The sand that we have found to produce the best results was
silica sand.  On acquiring another 100lb bag of the stuff, I found a rather
large warning label about possible health problems caused by the sand. 
Does anyone else use silica sand or have any information on the dangers of using
it in a two hour lab?  Also, does anyone else perform cratering labs with a
different material?

 

Thanks for all your valued help.
-Andy.

 

******************************************
Andy
Smith
Lab Supervisor/ Part-time Instructor
DePauw University
Physics
Greencastle,
IN
******************************************


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From bennett@oakland.edu Tue Sep 9 11:57:21 2003
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