Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 17:59:22 -0500

Author: Urs Lauterburg

Subject: RE: Science communicators

Post:

Can anyone tell me where "registration 3" is going to be located next Friday
and Saturday nights?

I think I have finally stumbled across an answer to my previous questions (in
postings that didn't make it through the server).
Where is "Predolin nnn, Edgewood"?
Where is "Sonderegger nnn, Edgewood"?
where "nnn" is one of a variety of room numbers.

Edgewood College has a Predolin Humanities Center and a Sonderegger Science
Center. I don't know why I couldn't find this information in The Announcer or
on the meeting web pages. Still need to know about "registration 3", though.

As alluded to above, I have been able to reply to amessage ("Re: Jerk") but
not to send in new ones. Weird. So, this message is a stripped reply to
another one on "workshops".

Jim

--
James R. Frysinger
Lifetime Certified Advanced Metrication Specialist
Senior Member, IEEE

http://www.cofc.edu/~frysingj
frysingerj@cofc.edu
j.frysinger@ieee.org

Office:
Physics Lab Manager, Lecturer
Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
University/College of Charleston
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Home:
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Charleston, SC 29407
843.225.0805

From urs.lauterburg@phim.unibe.ch Sun Jul 27 18:58:22 2003
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2003 17:59:22 -0500
From: Urs Lauterburg
Subject: RE: Science communicators
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Paul and other TAPlers,

This is an interesting question and it holds actually true for any given
discipline. What makes a few come off so strong leaving the majority way behind?
Probably it is just a mixture of properties which happen to fall together to
fulfill a given expectation which is also a mixture of hopes, needs and a strive
for wisdom (enlightenment). I would say that performing is an artistic
capability, which is not totally rational explainable. So if a person is really
devoted and intrigued by how nature reveals itself, if that person really has
the capability to intellectually grasp, feel and understand what our ancestors
have found out about how nature works, if the person has an interest and a
vision about domains of yet unknown knowledge and if he has a good sense of
humor and loves to communicate his knowledge, then he is a good mentor. Richard
Feynman I think was one of these extraordinary characters and therefore his
lectures still stand up and are actual even today. Any, in a broader sense
creative field has it's champions which show the rest the way it works, taking
an active part in the development of human culture.

An other physics related question would be to ask if nature cares herself cares
to be better understood by human creatures, which happen to live all together on
this lonely planet in space, barely capable to manage developing a better
understanding about her. I would say she does not care, because the sun shines
even without a single human being warmed, lite and comforted by her.

BTW: I am presently in Austin with National Instruments, writing some kind of a
book on ''How to LabVIEW in Physics Education''. Last saturday I had the chance
and the pleasure to see Karl Trappe and Andrew Yue of the U of T in action,
performing a physics circus. They did a great job and it was very inspiring. At
the same time, due to present politics, funding for the universities in the US
seems to be getting more and more difficult. I sometimes wonder about the road
we are going to take. Will the tradition of performing real world experiments in
physics education life on or will the mostly pretty shallow computer based
learning hype kill this traditional craftsmanship. I am increasingly suspicious
if someone thinks to simply install some short living computer boxes in schools
or universities is equal to innovation. I think we would do good to really come
up with long ranging strategies of blending the strength of old traditions with
contemporary technologies. There seems to be way more action than thought in
this respect. What do you all think?

Greeting from Austin

Urs

and if someone wants to call me up I have a number in the States until September
20. It is a NI phone number: (512) 683-5890


Urs Lauterburg
Physics demonstrator
LabVIEW wireworker
University of Bern
Switzerland


Quoting Ron Ebert :

> At 03:07 PM 7/26/2003 +0100, Paul McCrory wrote:
> >Hi everyone
> >
> >As part of my research into intrinsic motivation in science education
> >I'm trying to find out more about famous science communicators such as
> >Julius Sumner Miller and Mr Wizard - what is it about these
> >personalities that made them so effective and engaging to the public?
> >
> >Does anyone know where I might be able to get a copy of the "Dramatic
> >demonstrations in physics" video of Miller, or any other footage of him
> >in action?
> >
> >I'd also be interested in hearing your votes for the "best science
> >communicators I have ever seen" category.
> >
> >Thanks for your help in advance
>
> Well, the best science communicator I have ever seen is Bob Wild, who was
> largely responsible for putting our facility in place in UC Riverside in
> the 1960s and 1970s. While he didn't get to go on TV like Don Herbert and
> Julius Sumner Miller did and didn't become as widely known as them, he was
> as well known at the AAPT meetings and was held in equal regard by the
> attendants there. Indeed, he and Miller would frequently get into contests
> there and try to outdo each other for the most outrageous demos. Bob Wild
> has given demo shows to hundreds of schools and other groups in his career.
>
> As far as what makes these people such good communicators, I'd say it has
> to do with the nature of their personalities. They know how to connect with
> people one on one, how to engage with them in a way that is personally
> meaningful and important to them, and how to keep people engaged in
> whatever problem they wanted to present. I guess it boils down to
> understanding how other people think and what they do and don't care about.
>
> I don't know either where to get a video of Miller, but I'd also be
> interested in getting a copy.
>
> Ron Ebert
> UCR Physics Department
> ron.ebert@ucr.edu
> http://phyld.ucr.edu
>
>


--
========================================
Urs Lauterburg
University of Berne
urs.lauterburg@phim.unibe.ch

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From cablem@wfu.edu Mon Jul 28 10:26:30 2003
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Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 10:27:34 -0400
From: Machele Cable
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Ok all! The Tie Dye Party time has been set...although we're still
confirming the place. We're going to do it on Tuesday from 10AM until
Noon. Jim over at the University is looking into a good outdoor spot for
us, but barring that, we'll do it in my hotel parking lot. Visit the
PIRA resource room on Monday to get your T-shirt and a finalization!

Chele

--
~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~
Machele Cable Lab Manager Physics WFU
Phone: (336) 758-5532 Fax: (336) 758-6142
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There's a thin woman inside of me trying to get out,
but I can usually shut her up with some chocolate!

From reberg@physics.umd.edu Mon Jul 28 11:13:53 2003
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Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 11:14:49 -0400 (EDT)
From: Richard Berg
To: paul@think-differently.co.uk
cc: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: RE: Pencil Shoot Plans / communicators
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You might also try old tapes from the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.
For literally decades Julius Sumner Miller was a regular guest on his
show.

Dick Berg

***********************************************************************
Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice, Department of Physics
Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
U.S. mail address:
Lecture-Demonstration Facility
Department of Physics
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-4111
Phone: (301) 405-5994
FAX: (301) 314-9525
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***********************************************************************
From reberg@physics.umd.edu Mon Jul 28 11:18:52 2003
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Subject: RE: Science communicators
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Julius Sumner Miller also wrote a 440 page hardback book called
"Demonstrations in Physics." The latest date that I have on my copies is
1969. These are more academic in nature, although very much in the "fun"
spirit.

Dck Berg
***********************************************************************
Dr. Richard E. Berg, Professor of the Practice, Department of Physics
Director, Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility
U.S. mail address:
Lecture-Demonstration Facility
Department of Physics
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-4111
Phone: (301) 405-5994
FAX: (301) 314-9525
e-mail reberg@physics.umd.edu
www.physics.umd.edu/lecdem
***********************************************************************
From klopcict@kenyon.edu Mon Jul 28 11:26:19 2003
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From: "J. Terrence Klopcic"
To:
References: <3F07B961.10308@physics.niu.edu> <200307262001.24286.frysingerj@cofc.edu>
Subject: Re: Jerk
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Thinking about jerk....

Our examples for understanding jerk (projecting cabins into the air, etc.)
tend to require us to depart from my everyday experience. (Val would be
terribly upset if I projected our house ....) But, jerk is the RATE of
change of acceleration. Thus, understanding jerk through comparison
requires going from one acceleration to another at different rates - not a
common experience - except:

Consider driving in a car at constant speed and suddenly turning the
steering wheel. Compare that to the experience of gradually turning the
steering wheel to the same angle. In both cases the centripetal
acceleration starts at zero and goes to v^2/R - the change is the same. But
the rate of change is different. Equivalently, the centripetal forces on
the body are the same - but the rate of application is different. The final
sensation (being pressed against the car door) is the same - but the time
for the passenger to adjust is markedly different.

Does that provide a reasonably intuitive (and hopefully correct) example?

Terry










----- Original Message -----
From: "James Frysinger"
To:
Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2003 8:01 PM
Subject: Re: Jerk


> It seems to me that the point is the somatic sensory system. Let's look at
a
> simpler case. Someone has been launched upward in a cabin and on the way
up
> they feel as if they are floating. The viscera and the rest of the body
are
> traveling upwards at the same instantaneous speed and are experiencing the
> same acceleration. The viscera are *not* experiencing an upward force by
the
> floor of the abdominal cavity. The feet are not experiencing any upward
force
> by the floor of the cabin.
>
> Just as the cabin and its occupant reach the apex, the cabin is somehow
> "latched" into position. The cabin remains at rest, but the occupant is
still
> experiencing the Earth's attractive force (which had been causing the
> vertical deceleration, of course). Now the feet feel the cabin floor
pushing
> up on them and the viscera feel the abdominal cavity floor pushing up on
> them. That, I suggest, is the "jerk" that is felt. It feels as if the
person
> had just been accelerated upward, but all that has happened is that a
force
> from underneath has been exerted.
>
> This of course is what a person standing on Earth would feel if the floor
they
> were standing on *were* suddenly jerked upward---that is, a sudden
increase
> in upward force. In a way, it kind of relates to relativity theory.
>
> Jim
>
> On Sunday 2003 July 06 01:53, Patricia Sievert wrote:
> > What about the case of a ball tossed straight up. It is experiencing a
> > constant acceleration (g, or 9.81 m/s/s downwards). At the top of its
> > flight, velocity is zero, but acceleration is still 9.81 m/s/s
> > downwards. If at that precise moment, it is "caught", there would be no
> > change in velocity, but there would be a change in acceleration, or a
> > jerk.
> > Pati
> >
> > George M. Caplan wrote:
> > >It was written:
> > >
> > >
> > >"Although, they do not feel a change in velocity, they do feel a change
> > >in acceleration."
> > >
> > >>>From my thinking, there is no acceleration as no change in velocity
> > >
> > >occurs when the brake is applied. If there is no acceleration both
> > >before and after the brake is applied, then there cannot be a change in
> > >acceleration.
> > >
> > >Where did I go wrong?
> > >
> > >
> > >*******************************************
> > >
> > >I think that you should think about it this way:
> > >Imagine a graph of velocity vs. time.
> > >Before the brakes were applied, the graph had a
> > >constant non-zero slope. After the brakes were,
> > >applied it had zero slope. So, there was a change in
> > >acceleration.
> > >This example is VERY interesting.
>
> --
> James R. Frysinger
> Lifetime Certified Advanced Metrication Specialist
> Senior Member, IEEE
>
> http://www.cofc.edu/~frysingj
> frysingerj@cofc.edu
> j.frysinger@ieee.org
>
> Office:
> Physics Lab Manager, Lecturer
> Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
> University/College of Charleston
> 66 George Street
> Charleston, SC 29424
> 843.953.7644 (phone)
> 843.953.4824 (FAX)
>
> Home:
> 10 Captiva Row
> Charleston, SC 29407
> 843.225.0805
>
>
From frysingerj@cofc.edu Mon Jul 28 13:10:51 2003
From: James Frysinger
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
Subject: Meeting location questions
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2003 23:32:42 -0400
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