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Couldn't be torsional. Then it would depend on the astronaut's moment
of inertia and not his or her mass. You'd just want to move back and
forth in one dimension. Imagine attaching bungie cords to your self
and two opposing walls. You could bounce back and forth between them
in the absence of gravity.

Paul

On Wednesday, July 9, 2003, at 03:34 PM, John D'Mura wrote:

> Obviously the astronauts do not swing from a rope! The mode of
> oscillation
> must be in a torinal mode. For example the movement of a mechanical
> watch
> depends on oscillations around a pivot and is independent of gravity.
> Only
> the spring constant and the mass determine the period of oscillation.

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Couldn't be torsional. Then it would depend on the astronaut's moment
of inertia and not his or her mass. You'd just want to move back and
forth in one dimension. Imagine attaching bungie cords to your self
and two opposing walls. You could bounce back and forth between them
in the absence of gravity.


Paul


On Wednesday, July 9, 2003, at 03:34 PM, John D'Mura wrote:


Obviously the astronauts do not swing from a rope!
The mode of oscillation

must be in a torinal mode. For example the movement of a mechanical
watch

depends on oscillations around a pivot and is independent of gravity.
Only

the spring constant and the mass determine the period of oscillation.


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From hubisz@mindspring.com Wed Jul 9 17:31:30 2003

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