Date: Fri, 4 Jul 2003 11:37:32 -0700

Author: Eric Ayars

Subject: RE: Jerk

Post:

> >From my thinking, there is no acceleration as no change in velocity
>occurs when the brake is applied. If there is no acceleration both
>before and after the brake is applied, then there cannot be a change in
>acceleration.
>
>Where did I go wrong?

The acceleration BEFORE the brake is applied is not zero.
--

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Eric Ayars
Assistant Professor of Physics
California State University, Chico
ayars@mailaps.org
From gcaplan@wellesley.edu Sat Jul 5 18:06:34 2003
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Date: Sat, 05 Jul 2003 18:06:12 -0400
Subject: RE: Jerk
To: tap-l@listproc.appstate.edu
From: "George M. Caplan"
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It was written:


"Although, they do not feel a change in velocity, they do feel a change
in acceleration."

>>From my thinking, there is no acceleration as no change in velocity
occurs when the brake is applied. If there is no acceleration both
before and after the brake is applied, then there cannot be a change in
acceleration.

Where did I go wrong?


*******************************************

I think that you should think about it this way:
Imagine a graph of velocity vs. time.
Before the brakes were applied, the graph had a
constant non-zero slope. After the brakes were,
applied it had zero slope. So, there was a change in
acceleration.
This example is VERY interesting.

From sievert@physics.niu.edu Sun Jul 6 01:53:14 2003
Message-ID: <3F07B961.10308@physics.niu.edu>
Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2003 00:53:37 -0500
From: Patricia Sievert
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Subject: Re: Jerk
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What about the case of a ball tossed straight up. It is experiencing a
constant acceleration (g, or 9.81 m/s/s downwards). At the top of its
flight, velocity is zero, but acceleration is still 9.81 m/s/s
downwards. If at that precise moment, it is "caught", there would be no
change in velocity, but there would be a change in acceleration, or a
jerk.
Pati

George M. Caplan wrote:

>It was written:
>
>
>"Although, they do not feel a change in velocity, they do feel a change
>in acceleration."
>
>
>
>>>From my thinking, there is no acceleration as no change in velocity
>>
>>
>occurs when the brake is applied. If there is no acceleration both
>before and after the brake is applied, then there cannot be a change in
>acceleration.
>
>Where did I go wrong?
>
>
>*******************************************
>
>I think that you should think about it this way:
>Imagine a graph of velocity vs. time.
>Before the brakes were applied, the graph had a
>constant non-zero slope. After the brakes were,
>applied it had zero slope. So, there was a change in
>acceleration.
>This example is VERY interesting.
>
>
>

--
----
Pati Sievert, Outreach Coordinator
ICAR
Department of Physics
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, Il 60115
sievert@physics.niu.edu
815-753-6418
www.physics.niu.edu/~frontier




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What about the case of a ball tossed straight up.  It is experiencing a constant
acceleration (g, or 9.81 m/s/s downwards).  At the top of its flight, velocity
is zero, but acceleration is still 9.81 m/s/s downwards.  If at that precise
moment, it is "caught", there would be no change in velocity, but there would
be a change in acceleration, or a jerk.  

Pati



George M. Caplan wrote:

cite="midfc.006640d809c83a4a006640d809c83a4a.9c83aae@firstclass.wellesley.edu">
It was written:


"Although, they do not feel a change in velocity, they do feel a change
in acceleration."



>From my thinking, there is no acceleration as no change in velocity


occurs when the brake is applied. If there is no acceleration both
before and after the brake is applied, then there cannot be a change in
acceleration.

Where did I go wrong?


*******************************************

I think that you should think about it this way:
Imagine a graph of velocity vs. time.
Before the brakes were applied, the graph had a
constant non-zero slope. After the brakes were,
applied it had zero slope. So, there was a change in
acceleration.
This example is VERY interesting.





-- 
----
Pati Sievert, Outreach Coordinator
ICAR
Department of Physics
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, Il 60115
sievert@physics.niu.edu
815-753-6418
www.physics.niu.edu/~frontier







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