Date: Mon, 4 Nov 2002 08:26:59 -0600

Author: Paul Nord

Subject: Re: Newton's Law of Gravity Confirmed by Volleyball team's trip to Boulder?

Post:


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Dick,

So their statement is this:

> In general, the greater the air pressure, the greater the air
> resistance. As the soccer ball moves through the air, the air in front
> of it experiences a rise in air pressure and pushes the ball in the
> direction opposite its motion. While there are various other changes
> in air pressure around the ball's surface, this rising pressure in
> front of the ball remains largely unbalanced and it slows the ball
> down.
> The higher the air pressure was to start with, the greater its rise in
> front of the ball and the stronger the backward push of air
> resistance. Thus if you were to play soccer in the Rocky Mountains,
> where the air pressure is much less, you'd be able to kick the ball
> significantly farther.

But what we want to know is how they define "significantly farther".
It's not a very good scientific statement. Is the change 5%? Surely
it's not 50%.

Paul

On Friday, November 1, 2002, at 04:30 PM, Dick Heckathorn wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> Check out this website for "How Altitude Affects Distance Kicked" and
> other articles.
>
> http://www.oceansiderevolution.com/EINSTEIN_3.htm
>
> Dick
>
> "Science is nothing more than learning how to communicate with nature
> in
> such a manner that it will talk back."
>
> Helping teachers who facilitate, motivating students who learn.
> Dick Heckathorn 14665 Pawnee Trail Middleburg Hts, OH 44130
> 440-826-0834
> Physics Teacher CVCA 4687 Wyoga Rd Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44224
> 330-929-0575 VM 120
>
>
>

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Dick,


So their statement is this:


Times New RomanIn
general, the greater the air pressure, the greater the air resistance.
As the soccer ball moves through the air, the air in front of it
experiences a rise in air pressure and pushes the ball in the
direction opposite its motion. While there are various other changes
in air pressure around the ball's surface, this rising pressure in
front of the ball remains largely unbalanced and it slows the ball
down.

The higher the air pressure was to start with, the greater its rise in
front of the ball and the stronger the backward push of air
resistance. Thus if you were to play soccer in the Rocky Mountains,
where the air pressure is much less, you'd be able to kick the ball
significantly farther.

Times New Roman

But what we want to know is how they
define "significantly farther". It's not a very good scientific
statement. Is the change 5%? Surely it's not 50%.


Paul


On Friday, November 1, 2002, at 04:30 PM, Dick Heckathorn wrote:


Greetings,


Check out this website for "How Altitude Affects Distance Kicked" and

other articles.


http://www.oceansiderevolution.com/EINSTEIN_3.htm


Dick


"Science is nothing more than learning how to communicate with nature
in

such a manner that it will talk back."


Helping teachers who facilitate, motivating students who learn.

Dick Heckathorn 14665 Pawnee Trail Middleburg Hts, OH 44130

440-826-0834

Physics Teacher CVCA 4687 Wyoga Rd Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44224

330-929-0575 VM 120





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