Date: Thu, 09 May 2002 16:08:18 -0700

Author: "Kelly V. Beck"

Subject: Re: nickel hazard

Post:


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Hi Jerry,

Thanks for your reply!

Yep, I checked the MSDS. It does have the most comprehensive safety
information on substances, which raises a good question I've long had about
how to read and use the information in the MSDS. Because it is complete,
reading an MSDS is often like reading the side-effects of a
medication. For example, read the side effects of aspirin, and you might
think it a quite dangerous substance, yet we know that it is relatively
safe for most people. Analogously on the MSDS, consider the following
potential health effects listed for copper:

INHALATION: SHORT TERM EXPOSURE: irritation, metal fume fever
LONG TERM EXPOSURE: metallic taste
SKIN CONTACT: SHORT TERM EXPOSURE: irritation
LONG TERM EXPOSURE: no information on significant adverse effects
EYE CONTACT: SHORT TERM EXPOSURE: irritation, tearing, blurred vision
LONG TERM EXPOSURE: same as effects reported in short term exposure
INGESTION: SHORT TERM EXPOSURE: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache
LONG TERM EXPOSURE: no information on significant adverse effects

Certainly somebody has had these health effects after handling a piece of
copper, but I suspect they are rare. So, any words of advice on reading
and using the information in the MSDS in general?

Also interesting: there are three references given on all MSDS for
Carcinogen Status: OSHA, NTP, IARC. Anybody know why?

For Nickel, OSHA says it is not a carcinogen, but NTP and IARC say it is.

Kelly




At 04:40 PM 5/9/2002 -0600, you wrote:
> Have you checked any MSDS sources such as:
>http://hazard.com/index.html
>An MSDS has the most comprehensive safety information on a given substance
>that I know of. Maybe your campus safety people could help too...
>
> Jerry
>
>
>At 5/9/200203:56 PM, you wrote:
>>Hi Everybody,
>>
>>I'm doing a little background work on my niece's proposed science fair
>>project - that is, checking the safety issues of the supplies she's
>>requested. I thought you all might be able to help me out on this:
>>
>>She needs a small amount of nickel powder or nickel shot to mix with soil
>>in which she will be growing plants.
>>
>>Sites like the Los Alamos Periodic Table say:
>>Nickel is recognized as being potentially carcinogenic.
>>"Exposure to nickel metal and soluble compounds (as Ni) should not exceed
>>0.05 mg/cm3 (8-hour time-weighted average - 40-hour work week)."
>>
>>Yet, k-12 science suppliers sell nickel shot and powder, and label it
>>non-hazardous.
>>
>>Does anybody know, is handling nickel powder or shot dangerous? What are
>>the dangers here?
>>
>>Thanks for any advice you can send my way - it will help me earn my
>>good-aunt merit badge!
>>
>>Kelly
>>
>>
>>******************************************************************
>>Kelly V. Beck
>>Office of VPUE
>>5 - 9139


******************************************************************
Kelly V. Beck
Office of VPUE
5 - 9139

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Hi Jerry,



Thanks for your reply!



Yep, I checked the MSDS.  It does have the most comprehensive safety
information on substances, which raises a good question I've long had
about how to read and use the information in the MSDS.  Because it
is complete, reading an MSDS is often like reading the side-effects of a
medication.  For example, read the side effects of aspirin, and you
might think it a quite dangerous substance, yet we know that it is
relatively safe for most people.  Analogously on the MSDS, consider
the following potential health effects listed for copper:



INHALATION: SHORT TERM EXPOSURE: irritation, metal fume fever

LONG TERM EXPOSURE: metallic taste

SKIN CONTACT: SHORT TERM EXPOSURE: irritation

LONG TERM EXPOSURE: no information on significant adverse effects

EYE CONTACT: SHORT TERM EXPOSURE: irritation, tearing, blurred vision


LONG TERM EXPOSURE: same as effects reported in short term exposure


INGESTION: SHORT TERM EXPOSURE: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache


LONG TERM EXPOSURE: no information on significant adverse effects



Certainly somebody has had these health effects after handling a piece of
copper, but I suspect they are rare.  So, any words of advice on
reading and using the information in the MSDS in general?



Also interesting: there are three references given on all MSDS for
Carcinogen Status: OSHA, NTP, IARC.  Anybody know why?



For Nickel, OSHA says it is not a carcinogen, but NTP and IARC say it
is.



Kelly









At 04:40 PM 5/9/2002 -0600, you wrote:

     Have you checked any
MSDS sources such as:

http://hazard.com/index.html

An MSDS has the most comprehensive safety information on a given
substance that I know of.  Maybe your campus safety people could
help too...



                                                                        Jerry





At 5/9/200203:56 PM, you wrote:

Hi Everybody,



I'm doing a little background work on my niece's proposed science fair
project - that is, checking the safety issues of the supplies she's
requested.  I thought you all might be able to help me out on
this:



She needs a small amount of nickel powder or nickel shot to mix with soil
in which she will be growing plants.



Sites like the Los Alamos Periodic Table say:

Nickel is recognized as being potentially carcinogenic.

"Exposure to nickel metal and soluble compounds (as Ni) should not
exceed 0.05 mg/cm3 (8-hour time-weighted average -
40-hour work week)."



Yet, k-12 science suppliers sell nickel shot and powder, and label it
non-hazardous.



Does anybody know, is handling nickel powder or shot dangerous? 
What are the dangers here?



Thanks for any advice you can send my way - it will help me earn my
good-aunt merit badge!



Kelly





******************************************************************

Kelly V. Beck

Office of VPUE

5 - 9139




******************************************************************

Kelly V. Beck

Office of VPUE

5 - 9139


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