Date: Fri, 01 Mar 2002 20:58:36 -0500

Author: "Jason St. John"

Subject: Re: What really happened?

Post:

Seems to me that car D must have hit car C AFTER C hit A, producing the
second bump car A felt. Otherwise, I don't see how the second bump could
come about.

I don't see how this would ever ake a good demo; too difficult, expensive,
and possibly dangerous. ;)

On Fri, 1 Mar 2002, Dick Heckathorn wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> An accident occurred as follows:
>
> Car A (large Oldsmobile) braked suddenly as car B stopped quickly in
> front of car A.
>
> Car A stopped before impacting with car B. (Car B was not involved in
> the chain reaction.)
>
> Car A received two bumps from behind.
>
> The first bump was the larger of the two.
>
> The second bump was less than the first bump.
>
> The second bump occurred within a couple of seconds of the first.
>
> Car C (a small car) was behind Car A and Car D (a jeep wrangler) was
> behind car C
>
> The driver of Car C, the one in the center says that he was hit first
> from behind by car D, and then hit Car A.
>
> Car A <- Car C <- Car D
>
> >From the information provided, does the size and time of the two bumps
> on car A support the driver of Car C's contention that he was hit first
> and pushed into Car A?
>
> I happened to be in car A, a physics student from another school in car
> C and a student from my school in car D.
>
> Thanks in advance for any relative comments.
>
> Dick
>
> "Science is nothing more than learning how to communicate with nature in
> such a manner that it will talk back."
>
> Helping teachers who facilitate, motivating students who learn.
> Dick Heckathorn 14665 Pawnee Trail Middleburg Hts, OH 44130
> 440-826-0834
> Physics Teacher CVCA 4687 Wyoga Rd Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44224
> 330-929-0575 VM 120
>
>

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