Date: Thu, 09 Aug 2001 14:01:26 -0400

Author: Machele Bailey

Subject: Re: References for pitch-matching museum demo?

Post:

Well, Pbbbbbbbtttttt! Good points....I guess what I was trying to say I feel like
we're testing musical ability, not science. Perhaps this only annoys me because I
started off as a music major...

Chele

Paul Nord wrote:

> Chele,
>
> Hey, life is subjective. So, deal with it, ok?
>
> But seriously, you are correct, ear training is a skill required of Music
> majors. Grading it in a music theory class is quite appropriate. One
> does not need to have a good ear to be successful in physics. So, I'm not
> sure if you can expect students to perform a musical skill in a physics
> course. Just like you wouldn't expect the Music majors to solve problems
> in quantum mechanics. But the problem is not that testing the skill is
> subjective. Testing any skill is subjective. It is often very
> appropriate. If they can prove, by their performance at the end of the
> class, that they've gone through some serious effort to understand how the
> equipment functions and how to make adjustments with it, then they do
> demonstrate a useful laboratory skill.
>
> Paul
>
> On Thu, 9 Aug 2001, Machele Bailey wrote:
>
> > We do a lab similar to this using tuning forks and a sonometer. The students
> > are supposed to play mary had a little lamb at the end for the TA. I don't like
> > it because it's subjective; a student with no ear cannot get an A. However, as
> > a demo for a display, it'd be great!
> >
> > Chele
> >
> > "Dennis C. Henry" wrote:
> >
> > > To-whom-one-turns-first:
> > >
> > > I've been condemned to learn enough LabVIEW to guide students in our
> > > junior-year advanced lab course. In going through the tutorials and
> > > "example VIs [virtual instruments], I came across one on tone matching that
> > > reminded me of my long-time desire to build a pitch-matching demonstration,
> > > along the lines of the old analog ones at the Seattle Science Museum and
> > > the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. Many of you probably recall
> > > these, in which the user would be asked to listen to one tone and then
> > > match that simultaneously or after-the-fact with an adjustable tone. When
> > > the user thought that he or she had them matched, that person would push a
> > > button, and the machine would render a verdict on the accuracy. A lighted
> > > panel with ratings ranging from "symphony conductor" down to "tin ear"
> > > would flash. Although I am not a musician, I will modestly confess among
> > > friends that I used to do pretty well on these. In my occasional physics
> > > of sound a music course, I do a manual version of this with two signal
> > > generators and associated gear.
> > >
> > > It looks to me as though this would be a natural task for a LabVIEW
> > > program, with minimal I/O. Do any of you know of any references to the
> > > original demonstrations, or to more recent incarnations. I'd hate to
> > > reinvent a LabVIEW wheel, just to find that it was already out there. I
> > > plan to do some online searching, too.
> > >
> > > "Tinnitus" Dennis
> > > Dennis C. Henry Office Location: 213 Olin Hall
> > > Professor of Physics office phone: (507) 933-7314
> > > Gustavus Adolphus College office fax: (507) 933-6104
> > > St. Peter, MN 56082-1498 home phone: (507) 931-2784
> > > e-mail: dchenry@gac.edu http://www.gac.edu/~dchenry/
> >
> > --
> > Machele Bailey-----Lab Manager-----Wake Forest University
> >
> > -----"Nothing shocks me. I'm a scientist." - Indiana Jones-----
> >
> >

--
Machele Bailey-----Lab Manager-----Wake Forest University

-----"Nothing shocks me. I'm a scientist." - Indiana Jones-----

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